You start running into problems when you download the third-party app that allows for monitoring via your mobile phone. In theory, this should add all sorts of features, like push notifications, motion and audio sensing, and video recording for later viewing. And Motorola would be one of the only companies offering both a base station and app. The problem is, the app's connection is so intermittent, I could barely even try out those features, let alone use them with any sort of consistency.
Claiming to be the “first-ever monitor with interchangeable optical lens capability,” allowing customizable viewing angle and zoom, the DXR-8 represents a big leap in features — and price — from the reliable Infant Optics stalwart DXR-5 model. It has a larger (3.5 inch/9 cm) full color LCD display monitor compared to the DXR-5 (at 2.4 inch/6 cm) monitor screen. There is also an optional wide angle lens sold separately. The remote PTZ camera is also a step above the DXR-5 camera. The DXR-8 is commended for its ultra-long battery life — 10 hours on power-saving mode and 6 hours with screen on — which far outlasts most competitors’ products.
Its parent display unit is the smallest we tested, with a screen only 2.4 inches wide, but the video quality was among the best. By comparison, Infant Optics’ bigger screen didn’t offer a better picture, and our Motorola model had an obvious two-second delay — even when we took it off WiFi and used its direct signal mode to rule out connectivity issues. The differences are slight, but we were impressed that the HelloBaby could keep up with monitors twice its price.
Long Range: Monitors that don’t connect to WiFi have a limited range, usually around 600 to 1,000 feet. While this is large enough for all but the biggest houses, we asked our testers to find out how far they could wander away — and how many walls they could put between them and the baby unit — before they went out of range, as well as to report back on what happened when they did. Sometimes there was an alarm or a notification, but other times the screen simply froze.
It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
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