The HelloBaby Video Baby Monitor has a 3.2-inch LCD screen and can transmit video up to roughly 900 feet. It has lots of great features you may not find on other budget video monitors, including two-way talk, night vision, a temperature display, zoom in and out, digital pan and tilt, a scan view and the ability to play eight lullabies. There’s also helpful warnings if the temperature gets too hot or cold, if there’s no signal and if there’s low power. Finally, the last great thing we love about this monitor is an “auto mute” feature that will turn off the baby monitor speaker when sound is below 50 decibels for more than seven seconds and automatically turn on when noise occurs, which saves battery.
Parents are spoiled for choice nowadays, thanks to the rise of the connected home and new technologies like live-streaming video and high-resolution cameras. No matter which type of baby monitor you buy — whether it be an old-school audio-only monitor or a fancy Wi-Fi video monitor — it will have two parts: a monitor in the baby's room and a receiver that you carry around with you to hear and/or view your baby.

Look for a monitoring system that is a good fit for your home and lifestyle. For example, if you’re in a small apartment in a busy city, having a monitor that has a long range won’t be as important to you, but one that screens out background noise will. For parents that frequently travel or work long days, being able to check on your child from anywhere and talk over the audio can help keep you connected. But, for those who are with their kids most of the time this might not matter much. The point is, consider what will make parenting easier and your family happiest and you can’t go wrong.


One of the biggest concerns with a baby monitor is going out of range and not hearing baby crying for you. Talk about a case of mom guilt! When shopping for the best long-range baby monitor, note that the range listed on the box doesn’t account for walls or doors; it’s a line-of-sight range. So, although you may not actually be able to travel 1,000 feet away from baby, you should be able to head to the basement to do laundry or be outside in the yard without worrying about missing baby’s cries.

Right from the start, this video monitor never worked and was unreliable. The longest I would get a connection was 14 seconds. That's right - seconds. Even when I had the base literally 3 feet from the monitor, I would loose the connection in a matter of seconds. Plus the cord for the base was loose. The only was I could keep it in was if I held it there. It's going back today!
Together with our technology and electronics partners Voxx, Project Nursery has introduced the first-ever baby monitor system with Amazon Alexa Voice Service compatibility. In the same way you call upon Alexa for help with other tasks in your life, Alexa is now the second set of hands—okay, maybe not hands but definitely help—you have always wanted for the nursery.
The video on its handheld unit is sharp and consistent, and even with 30 feet between the camera and the handheld unit, there wasn’t lag or interruption in the video. In addition, you can use the handheld unit to remotely point the camera at different parts of the room. Although you can't record video or take pictures with the DXR-8, these aren’t important features for a baby monitor. Setup is incredibly easy. After charging the handheld unit overnight, we plugged in the camera and it instantly connected. There was a slight lag in the video when the camera and handheld unit were 50 feet apart, which is why it only scored 90 percent in our connection test, but that’s still better than other baby monitors we reviewed. In our battery life test, the monitor lasted 10 hours – only one other model has a battery that lasts this long. This video baby monitor doesn't have Wi-Fi, but that's not a problem. Our top Wi-Fi monitor, the Philips Avent, is more expensive and didn't perform as well as the DXR-8 in our tests. This baby camera has swappable lenses for telephoto and wide-angle views. It also has invisible infrared LEDs that let you see your baby in complete darkness without waking them. The DXR-8 doesn't have a nightlight or lullabies to comfort your baby, but those exclusions don't make this baby monitor any less impressive. The warranty on the DXR-8 only lasts a year, compared to the two-year warranty on the Philips Avent.
Okay, this is my fifth video monitor. Sixth, actually, because I replaced a Motorola one. I started with the Wi-Fi baby monitor, which my friends have liked. When I set it up it was easy but the camera wasn't very good. Also I needed a phone or some kind of device to check on the baby which didn't make any sense to me once I got it out of the box, because you want to monitor going all the time. So I returned that and I did a lot of research and ended up with the Motorola. The Motorola had a very good camera but it said pan and scan on the box and it was just a manual pan and scan. It had a temperature reading which I liked, and lullabies which is stupid. The reason the Motorola ultimately failed is the battery life And more

The Motorola MBP36XL 5″ Portable Video Baby Monitor is a wireless digital monitor that offers great picture quality on its large, five-inch screen. Its infrared/night vision camera delivers a very sharp and clear image—good news since nighttime is usually when you need it most. The range on this monitor impressed us in our tests. The parent unit has a rechargeable battery, and there’s also a battery in the camera, which could come in handy during power outages.
Bargain hunters may prefer the iBaby M6T. Though it's a couple years old and records video in in 720p resolution, it's still a capable monitor with night vision, two-way audio and helpful pan-and-tilt capabilities. It's also available for nearly $100 less than the Arlo Baby. If the voice-powered Alexa assistant is a part of your family, consider the Project Nursery Smart Baby Monitor, which includes a smart speaker in its $229 bundle that lets you remote control the camera.

Watching your child from moment to moment is far more important than going over footage from previous nights, so baby monitors don't usually make a big deal about saving video for later, whether using built-in storage or through a cloud service. They can take snapshots and short clips when they detect movement, but they won't offer time-lapse videos of entire nights at once, or let you page through hours or days of footage. Those features are useful for identifying burglars, but they don't really help you watch your child unless you're in a Paranormal Activity sequel.
Like many monitors in this price range, the SafeVIEW provides a lot of bells and whistles: remote zoom, tilt and pan of the camera, two-way communication and a range of 900 feet so you don’t have to stress about chatting with your neighbor outside during naptime. The SafeVIEW also has a built-in nightlight that you can turn on and off using the monitor. And, if the monitor is going nuts every time a big truck drives by or during a thunderstorm, you can decrease its sound sensitivity to not pick up the background noise.
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