Larger homes or locations with more than 4 or 5 walls between the camera and parent unit might be stuck with a Wi-Fi monitor. Most of the dedicated monitors only worked up to 4 walls, with the exception of the Project Nursery 4.3 that stopped working at 3. The Philips Avent SCD630 has the longest range for dedicated monitors in this review, with an impressive 92 ft through 5 walls, so if your needs are greater than that, then none of the dedicated monitors we tested are likely to work for your situation. Wi-Fi connected cameras, on the other hand, are limited only by the wireless router location in relation to the camera and parent unit, and the strength and speed of your Wi-Fi connection. If necessary, routers can often be moved, or range extenders added, to increase the range between the components if the Wi-Fi monitor struggles to keep a clear or consistent connection. Purchasing a monitor from a venue with a simple return policy like Amazon means you'll be able to test the monitor in your house to determine how well it works without the risk of being stuck with a useless product.
The DXR-8 uses a secure 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission to ensure privacy, gets up to 10 hours of battery life on a single charge, and can switch to audio-only mode with the camera off to save juice. That said, it has gotten panned for a quickly declining battery life (as well as poor range). Still, that hasn’t stopped 24,000 reviewers from giving it an overall 5-star rating on Amazon. In terms of bells and whistles, it features everything parents have come to expect in a monitor: invisible infrared night vision, (no annoying blue light to wake the baby) two-way intercom, room-temperature sensor, and the ability to work with up to four other cameras.
However, when it came to actually functionality, the DXR-8 was by far the BETTER choice. The on-screen touch controls of the Samsung lagged and were difficult to use. The Samsung’s touch screen is far different than the touch screen on their cell phones, their touch screen has little sensors throughout that you can see if you look at it closely. The Samsung also went out of range (as noted in many of the pictures) when compared to the DXR-8. In one picture I took both units outside. The DXR-8 went over 200’ from my house (and probably could have gone much further). The Samsung went out of range before I even got out the door. The Samsung unit failed at three different areas in my house. Trust me when I tell you that I didn’t make the test easy either. I had three doors shut and about four walls separating the handheld units from their cameras. I took them throughout the house, side-by-side, at the same time. Save yourself both time and $$$ and just start with the Infant Optics DXR-8. Additional pros of the DXR-8 include the on-screen temperature display of the baby’s room, and a brighter display (the Samsung display was rather disappointing, I thought it would have been the far better display, but it simply was not). The only con of the DXR-8 is the smaller screen size, but it is sufficient. Both units functioned about the same when it came to night vision.
At over $200, are advanced audio/video monitoring systems with multiple cameras and receivers with large screens, as well as the ability to connect to several mobile devices. While they are loaded with features, it’s important to look closely at the audio and video quality. Expensive monitors are just as susceptible to interference as inexpensive ones.
Gone are the days of silently peeking into the nursery to check on your napping baby and then, whoops, accidentally waking them up (“No, no, please no!”). A baby monitor uses a camera to watch over the crib, while you carry a handheld device that lets you know what’s going on with your child at any given moment, no matter where you are in your home. There are also other monitors that track sleep or breathing either with a clip or sock.
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