Its parent display unit is the smallest we tested, with a screen only 2.4 inches wide, but the video quality was among the best. By comparison, Infant Optics’ bigger screen didn’t offer a better picture, and our Motorola model had an obvious two-second delay — even when we took it off WiFi and used its direct signal mode to rule out connectivity issues. The differences are slight, but we were impressed that the HelloBaby could keep up with monitors twice its price.
Overall rating: F-. I really dislike this monitor and wish I purchased something else. Are most of my problems with the monitor the result of my own incompetence? Yes, but a solid 30% is design flaws and needless features. My competence levels highly correspond to the amount of sleep I get, and a new baby means I'm pretty incompetent. But I want a monitor that accounts for that and doesn't make it easier for me to (1) Wake up the freaking baby; or (2) make it easier for my partner to wake me up (or vice versa) when I finally have a chance.
Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.
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