We tested each product we purchased in key metrics that allow them to function as expected, or provides an additional feature or benefit. Monitors act as something of a lifeline for parents, so it is important that they work well, have adequate range, provide useful images, and are easy to use. If a product doesn't work well enough to instill confidence, then it will fail to offer parents the one thing they really want, more sleep.
Our main concerns were getting a good camera with quality night imaging, good sound and an easily viewable monitor. We also felt we didn't want a system that sent our image feed off to some remote server where it would be stored for some period of time for whatever analytics that the company performed. The Infant Optics DXR-8 fulfilled all our wishes.

Every parent we spoke to agreed. A video monitor is the way to go. It’s the difference between getting up to check on your baby because you thought you heard a noise or glancing at a screen to see if you really need to get out of bed. Video monitors are useful well into the toddler years, too. That screen can help you decide whether you need to step in and comfort your child, or if you can wait out a tantrum.
The monitor uses a 2.4GHz frequency to boost the signal strength between the camera and the parent unit. In our test, the parent unit functioned 150 feet away from the camera, and it can work up to 1,000 feet away outdoors. The baby monitor alerts you once it's out of range of the camera. This earns the baby monitor a 70 percent connectivity score. We tested connectivity by positioning one unit upstairs with the monitor on the floor directly below. There was a noticeable delay on the monitor between video and audio feeds.
It’s hard not to like the crystal-clear picture you get on this monitor’s 7-inch screen (the biggest screen on this list!). Its standalone camera can be moved from room to room and will remotely pan, tilt and zoom. Given the cost, this monitor is best if you want full control of the nursery environment. It syncs with the Smart Nursery humidifier and the Dream Machine sound and light machine. Once connected, you can turn on lullabies, project lights onto the ceiling and increase the room’s humidity all from your monitor.
The Motorola MBP36S digital video baby monitor features wireless 2.4 GHz FHSS technology, which offers a reliable connection for better range and less chance of a dropped signal. It is equipped with multiple camera viewing with picture-in-picture and auto-switch screen options, allowing you to add additional cameras and keep an eye on the entire family in up to 4 rooms of your home. (Model: MBP36SBU, sold separately.) The superior wireless range of the MBP36S allows you to stay connected to your baby up to 590 feet away.

When you're child is still an infant, your family's UrbanHello REMI will serve as an audio baby monitor that helps you keep tabs on the little one. Its softly glowing face also serves as a clock parents and other caregivers can check when in the nursery. When paired with its app, REMI's sleep tracking function will help you establish your child's sleep patterns, noting evident wakeups and periods of steady rest based on the sounds it detects in the room.


The Philips Avent SCD630 is the easiest to use dedicated option with a score of 8 of 10. This monitor is a plug and play that pairs the camera and parent unit by itself. The parent unit has very few buttons, with the most frequently used buttons are on the face of the unit. The menu options are relatively intuitive with not much chance of taking a wrong turn or getting buried in a file menu system you can't get out of. The menu could be easier to use, but we think most parents will stick to the buttons on the front of the unit after a few weeks of regular use. The Levana Lila has fewer features and is even easier to use, thanks to a lack of convoluted menu options.
It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
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