Motorola's greatest strength is its out-of-the-box usability. Like the comparable VTech Monitor, it's perfect if you want to use the monitor mostly in-home. Leave the camera pointing at your child, run to the next room to do a little work, and you've got a screen right there with two-way audio and night vision. You can even pan and tilt the camera using the base station, albeit with noticeable latency.
I have had the monitor for a little over a month and have had no issues. My last monitor was a Motorola mbp36 and gave out after 3 years. The Motorola was heavier and felt more durable, however it is also nice to have a lightweight monitor. The features have all worked well on the ANMEATE. I actually prefer the night vision on the ANMEATE as it's much clearer than it was on the Motorola. The two way talk and the zoom/pan feature seems equal on the two. I could move the actual camera angle via remote on the Motorola and I really miss that. Sometimes I put the camera at a bad angle and I get downstairs to the monitor just to realize I can't see the baby. Then I have to run back up and fix it instead of moving it with the remote. So that stinks, but now I try to angle the camera better the first time. My main reason for getting this monitor was the price. I could add more cameras for 40 instead of 100 a piece. Not to mention I got the first camera and parent unit for half the price of the Motorola.

While buying an audio-only monitor in 2018 is slightly akin to buying a flip phone, the Philips Avent has pretty much all the same features as top-of-the-line camera baby monitors, sans camera. Even better, it uses DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Communications) technology to guarantee zero interference ⏤ so it won’t get crossed with other signals in your house and/or your neighbor’s cordless phone. The Philips has a range of more than 90-ft inside, a 10-hour battery life, and it uses a “cry mode” so you’re only alerted to real cries for attention rather than background noise. As for extra features, it includes a night light, in-room temperature monitor, and plays lullabies ⏤ if only you could just see the baby.

This was a very convenient product. Ever since I started using it I didn’t have to worry about my daughter waking up or crying when I’m doing something especially downstairs. The view was very clear so you can see easily what is happening. I’ve purchased other ones and it wasn’t that clear so this is definitely really good. It was also really easy to use and setup I definitely recommend it to every mom out there that worries about their child when you’re working.

Okay, this is my fifth video monitor. Sixth, actually, because I replaced a Motorola one. I started with the Wi-Fi baby monitor, which my friends have liked. When I set it up it was easy but the camera wasn't very good. Also I needed a phone or some kind of device to check on the baby which didn't make any sense to me once I got it out of the box, because you want to monitor going all the time. So I returned that and I did a lot of research and ended up with the Motorola. The Motorola had a very good camera but it said pan and scan on the box and it was just a manual pan and scan. It had a temperature reading which I liked, and lullabies which is stupid. The reason the Motorola ultimately failed is the battery life And more
The Philips Avent SCD630 is the easiest to use dedicated option with a score of 8 of 10. This monitor is a plug and play that pairs the camera and parent unit by itself. The parent unit has very few buttons, with the most frequently used buttons are on the face of the unit. The menu options are relatively intuitive with not much chance of taking a wrong turn or getting buried in a file menu system you can't get out of. The menu could be easier to use, but we think most parents will stick to the buttons on the front of the unit after a few weeks of regular use. The Levana Lila has fewer features and is even easier to use, thanks to a lack of convoluted menu options.

Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.

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