However, when it came to actually functionality, the DXR-8 was by far the BETTER choice. The on-screen touch controls of the Samsung lagged and were difficult to use. The Samsung’s touch screen is far different than the touch screen on their cell phones, their touch screen has little sensors throughout that you can see if you look at it closely. The Samsung also went out of range (as noted in many of the pictures) when compared to the DXR-8. In one picture I took both units outside. The DXR-8 went over 200’ from my house (and probably could have gone much further). The Samsung went out of range before I even got out the door. The Samsung unit failed at three different areas in my house. Trust me when I tell you that I didn’t make the test easy either. I had three doors shut and about four walls separating the handheld units from their cameras. I took them throughout the house, side-by-side, at the same time. Save yourself both time and $$$ and just start with the Infant Optics DXR-8. Additional pros of the DXR-8 include the on-screen temperature display of the baby’s room, and a brighter display (the Samsung display was rather disappointing, I thought it would have been the far better display, but it simply was not). The only con of the DXR-8 is the smaller screen size, but it is sufficient. Both units functioned about the same when it came to night vision.

The operating range of the parent unit is up to 1,000 feet outdoors or 150 feet indoors (to compensate for walls). The parent unit can be set to beep if the link between it and the baby unit is lost, or its rechargeable battery is low. If you don’t want to always concentrate on listening, the system features a vibrating sound alert that detects audio. Most Amazon.com reviewers have raved about the product for its simplicity, while others have found reliability problems with the rechargeable batteries.
This was a very convenient product. Ever since I started using it I didn’t have to worry about my daughter waking up or crying when I’m doing something especially downstairs. The view was very clear so you can see easily what is happening. I’ve purchased other ones and it wasn’t that clear so this is definitely really good. It was also really easy to use and setup I definitely recommend it to every mom out there that worries about their child when you’re working.
Whether you’re planning to stock up on back-to-school items, have been waiting to splurge on a car seat or high-tech baby monitor, or just want to treat your kids to some new books and toys, the retail giant has monster sales in all kids’ categories starting at 3 p.m. EST on July 16 and going through 3:00 a.m. on July 17. In fact, RetailMeNot said that “toys” is one of the top categories to shop on the site during the 36-hour sale. Still feeling a little overwhelmed by choice? Here are a few of the best sales to shop today.
Video, Audio, or Both: First-time parents are suckers for high-definition, night-vision baby monitors where they can pick up on exactly how their child’s chest is rising and falling. You will do this dozens of times a night. Past the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome-scare age, you may just want an audio baby monitor (which a lot of video ones double as), because you’ll know an “I’m hungry” cry from an “I lost my sock” whine.
I love everything about this camera except one thing. I love being able to review my child in another room morning or night. My biggest reason why why I chose this monitor was because I didn't mean to connect too. The picture is very clear I love being able to talk my child from another room letting him know that I will be there soon period what I dislike is how my voice over the monitor. I kind of sound like a robot period it kind of has an echo and a small high pitch. Other than that, this camera is great.
Features are important, but we encourage you to consider which features you think you will realistically use and which sound like fun in theory, but probably won't happen in practice. Many of the monitors carry a higher price tag and justify the price with the addition of features parents are unlikely to use in real life. Features like alarm clocks for feeding schedules, and alerts for low humidity might feel like something you should consider, but in practice, sound activation and quality images are more useful. In fact, more features often translate to being more difficult to use, and many of the features are novelty functions that most parents stop using over time. A good example of this is the Philips Avent SCD630 with an ease of use score of 8, but a features score of only 4. Try not to fall for the propaganda of bells and whistles that you might only use for the first few weeks. In the end, what you want is a good monitor with great sound and video quality.
The Motorola MBP36XL wasn’t the fastest-charging battery we tested, but it was reasonable. Most of our hands-on parent testers were happy with the battery life on the parent unit, and they were able to fully recharge it in under five hours. We really like that this monitor also has a rechargeable battery on the camera, which can be used for up to three hours—the more flexibility you have at nap time, the better. One feature this monitor doesn’t have that a few of our parent testers would have appreciated is a sleep or power-save mode.
Surprisingly, there are low-cost options to be found in the video monitors, some with prices similar to or better than their sound counterparts. These great buys include dedicated and Wi-Fi cameras for the basic and more tech-savvy parents alike. Consider the Best Value Levana Lila as a no-nonsense option that anyone can easily use with a price under $100. Or the LeFun C2 720P Wi-Fi with a list price of $70 and video images good enough to get the job done. If you have a higher budget, and find value in products that will last for years to come, the Nest Cam Indoor Wi-Fi has a list price around $200, but for the money, you can use it for years in multiple capacities outside baby monitoring, including security and a nanny cam. With awesome products like these, it is easy to see why video monitors have gained in popularity in recent years.
Ease of use may not seem like a big deal because once you know how to use something, it won't seem that hard, and after you use it for a while it can feel intuitive even if it isn't. However, with this type of product, there can be a learning curve depending on what kind you choose and how many features it has. While the dedicated monitors were plug in and go options that even grandma can manage, some of them took a little more skill to navigate and learn. The Wi-Fi options, on the other hand, do require some knowledge of technology and the way apps work. With all of them, you will need to set up the camera with your computer or another device, and you will need to set up an account and be able to manage things like Wi-Fi passwords and various settings inside the application. While this may seem like no big deal to some parents, it could be challenging for those that are less tech-savvy.
We tested and compared 9 of the most popular video monitors in this review using a comprehensive series of tests with continued use over several months. Our tests were designed to provide you with the information you need to make an informed decision on which product is right for your family and needs. Each monitor is scored based on performance experienced during our hands-on, side-by-side testing process. The test results determine the metric scores, and those scores combine to create overall scores and rank. Metric scores are derived from our in-house lab and user experience "in the field." Overall scores were weighted with a preference for the range, video quality, and sound clarity.
The video on its handheld unit is sharp and consistent, and even with 30 feet between the camera and the handheld unit, there wasn’t lag or interruption in the video. In addition, you can use the handheld unit to remotely point the camera at different parts of the room. Although you can't record video or take pictures with the DXR-8, these aren’t important features for a baby monitor. Setup is incredibly easy. After charging the handheld unit overnight, we plugged in the camera and it instantly connected. There was a slight lag in the video when the camera and handheld unit were 50 feet apart, which is why it only scored 90 percent in our connection test, but that’s still better than other baby monitors we reviewed. In our battery life test, the monitor lasted 10 hours – only one other model has a battery that lasts this long. This video baby monitor doesn't have Wi-Fi, but that's not a problem. Our top Wi-Fi monitor, the Philips Avent, is more expensive and didn't perform as well as the DXR-8 in our tests. This baby camera has swappable lenses for telephoto and wide-angle views. It also has invisible infrared LEDs that let you see your baby in complete darkness without waking them. The DXR-8 doesn't have a nightlight or lullabies to comfort your baby, but those exclusions don't make this baby monitor any less impressive. The warranty on the DXR-8 only lasts a year, compared to the two-year warranty on the Philips Avent.
Video products for monitoring baby is a growing industry, and it feels like every company is jumping on the bandwagon and throwing something into the already overflowing market of monitors. This plethora of products can make sorting through products difficult and attempts to narrow the field daunting. Luckily, we have already done the legwork by doing an initial review of the top products and choosing 9 of the most popular and well-rated options to test and compare. After months of hands-on testing, we feel confident that no matter what you might be looking for in a video product for monitoring baby, that you can find it in one of our award winners or the top-ranked products in this review.
Stay connected with your baby where ever you go with a one-of-a-kind camera that lets you see and hear more than ever right from your phone. This best in class WiFi baby monitor provides both the highest video quality and security available for a video baby monitor, and includes a feature-rich mobile app that will allow you to confidently monitor your baby, both at home and while on the go.
Long Range: Monitors that don’t connect to WiFi have a limited range, usually around 600 to 1,000 feet. While this is large enough for all but the biggest houses, we asked our testers to find out how far they could wander away — and how many walls they could put between them and the baby unit — before they went out of range, as well as to report back on what happened when they did. Sometimes there was an alarm or a notification, but other times the screen simply froze.
You can get the same system, with a traditional monitor screen that’s slightly smaller at 4.3 inches, for cheaper. If you’re interested in having two zoom cameras or an app that lets you see your baby while away, Project Nursery offers those configurations as well. You can also record video and take photos with it as well (requires an SD card sold separately).
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