However, the Baby Delight’s biggest flaw is one of technicality: Its button sensor is just large enough to avoid being labeled as a choking hazard, but it doesn’t leave a lot of room for error. In fact, the button does become a choking risk after your child is 3 years old, and the new parents we spoke to felt uneasy about using it after 12 months just to be safe. Still, if you’re only interested in monitoring movements for the first few months, the Baby Delight is a more user-friendly alternative to the Angelcare.
However, some customers complained that the video feed can only be viewed live unless one wants to pay between US$100 – 300 per year for the Dropcam monthly recording service. While Dropcam will send a “tiny” thumbnail to an email address when motion is detected, it has been noted that the image is so small as to be “worthless.” Others cite streaming delays on LTE (4G) and Wi-Fi, problems with talkback and a “blurry” zoom image. Related to the first complaint is an observation that video can’t be saved on one’s smartphone or computer; for a monthly fee, it can only be retained “in the cloud” on Dropcam’s web database. To their credit, Dropcam’s engineering team has acknowledged the talkback audio and camera zoom problems and have taken steps to correct the issues.

As with any internet-connected device that watches or listens to your home, it's not out of the ordinary to be somewhat wary of a smart baby monitor. All Internet of Things (IoT) devices are potential soft spots for hackers to monitor you. Anything you network can possibly be compromised, and while you shouldn't be afraid of an epidemic of camera breaches, you should always weigh the convenience of these devices against the risk of someone getting control of the feed.
The small and compact design is a must in my small nursery, where there is limited space and plug sockets. The BT Audio Baby Monitor 450 cuts down on all the essential gadgets by incorporating lights, sound, music and temperature as well as the two-way audio monitor. I feel much more reassured about being able to hear my baby clearly and love the addition of lullabies and a lightshow to help my baby drift off to sleep.
Reliability. This is a tough one, as it requires long-term knowledge of system reliability, through thick and thin. There are many baby monitors on the market that start out excellent but tend to glitch out or completely fail within the first several months of ownership. This is especially the case for many unrecognized brand names that are saturating the market. If you're buying this as a baby registry gift the last thing you want to do is make the new parents think you cheaped out on a junky baby monitor! All of the best video monitors that make it onto our list have withstood the test of time, lasting at least 6 months, and in some cases several years at this point (like the Infant Optics option!). Another point about reliability that's worth mentioning is that most modern wifi baby monitors will keep a local connection to your app even when the internet is down. So as long as you're still in your house, you can continue streaming video even when the internet is down.
Despite the 4.4 stars out of 5 the DXR-8 receives (based on well over 200 reviews) from Amazon customers, some users report that the monitor conflicts with other devices on the 2 GHz wavelength, viz, the monitor drops the wireless signal from the camera. Others grouse that while up to four cameras can be connected to one monitor, only one camera can be paired to one monitor, viz, only one monitor can be used. This means, similarly to the Foscam FBM 3501 mentioned previously, a parent can only monitor one child in one room with the DXR-8 and not multiple rooms simultaneously. Also, the   DXR-8 does not have internet streaming capability to one’s smartphone or tablet — a glaring omission considering the product’s hefty price tag.
The MoonyBaby Monitor has a large 4.3-inch display, but we dismissed it because the camera can’t pan or tilt throughout the room. The company does offer a model with a pan/tilt function, but with only two reviews so far (and only 36 on the more popular fixed-camera option, as of September 2018) we can’t recommend either without a longer record of reliability.

A big screen, a camera that zooms and a built-in nightlight make the In View monitor a great pick when you’re on a budget. The monitor also offers all the standard features: low-battery and out-of-range indicators, sound-activated lights and rechargeable batteries for the handheld monitor. Use the camera as a tabletop or mounted on the wall. And if you plan on having a big family, the monitor works with up to four cameras.
×