Beyond that, we wanted to hear from an expert on the products’ (perceived and real) security risks. So we spoke to Mark Stanislav, the director of application security for Duo Security and the author of Hacking IoT: A Case Study on Baby Monitor Exposures and Vulnerabilities, whose research has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press, CNET, Good Morning America, and Forbes.

When shopping for baby monitor, try to choose a product that offers both quality and security. For best results, opt for a model that offers both audio and video capabilities. You should be able to see and hear your baby in real time and also talk back to them as needed. Baby monitors can vary dramatically in quality, but today's models offer stunning HD video that ensures you can see your baby's surroundings with crystal clarity. Purchase the best quality you can afford, and enjoy the peace of mind that comes from knowing that your baby is closely within reach.
The Snuza Hero SE is a wearable device that clips to baby's diaper or bottoms. It has a unique vibration alert that attempts to rouse little ones into moving enough to stop the impending alarm that will sound audibly if the baby doesn't move. This vibration feature means that false alarms may be less likely to result in a crying baby, though they could cause lack of deep sleep if they happen continually. The Snuza is a nice wearable choice that is easy to use, portable, and didn't have many false alarms during our testing. While it is not a replacement for safer sleep practices, it could provide some parents with increased peace of mind for a better night's sleep.
Wireless systems use radio frequencies that are designated by governments for unlicensed use. For example, in North America frequencies near 49 MHz, 902 MHz or 2.4 GHz are available. While these frequencies are not assigned to powerful television or radio broadcasting transmitters, interference from other wireless devices such as cordless telephones, wireless toys, computer wireless networks, radar, Smart Power Meters and microwave ovens is possible.

"I love this system and how it allows us to monitor the baby so well! The cameras are easy to install and set up with Wi-Fi and you can mount the cameras over the crib. This allows a full body view that a lot of monitors can't offer. The clarity of the picture (that you get from an app on your smart phone) is amazing and the automatic night vision mode makes seeing baby any time of the day simple--you can check on baby anywhere your smart phone is. I love how versatile this system is and that we can move the cameras anywhere--which means we can use them after baby is out of the crib. It's a great investment for any family and I highly recommend it."
As a 2018 Leaf with ProPilot owner, I can agree with his, although relying on AI for areas where such tech is weak can be dangerous. The Leaf cameras are blinded by sunlight so it loses track of the edges of roads and starts to drift, the radar then kicks in warning you, but by then, you're almost colliding with the central reservation.. (Even if the car auto corrects when it senses an object on it's right or left, you or the car will have to brake or correct so forcefully, an accident may be caused.)Only way forward for true self driving vehicles is human level AI but linked to multiple sensors, so the vehicle has 360 degree vision - our one weakness!

Intuitive and User-Friendly Menu and Features: What good are 25 fancy features if you can't figure out how to navigate the menu and customize settings or change options? All of the best baby monitors reviewed above have great utility, with high video quality and a nice feature set, but some of them have relatively high usability, which comes in handy when you don't want to spend too much time shuffling through menus to change one silly setting.

Among the negative reviews, the most consistent complaint has to do with connectivity issues—either difficulty linking up initially or randomly dropping the connection while in use. These represent a slim minority among mostly positive reviews, and we did not have similar issues during our test. One consequence of losing the connection (whether it’s by a dropped link or via manually unplugging the camera) is that disconnecting causes the parent unit to emit a sharp, loud, repetitive beep. It is annoying—especially so if it happens in the middle of the night—but you should rarely hear it under normal circumstances.


As with any internet-connected device that watches or listens to your home, it's not out of the ordinary to be somewhat wary of a smart baby monitor. All Internet of Things (IoT) devices are potential soft spots for hackers to monitor you. Anything you network can possibly be compromised, and while you shouldn't be afraid of an epidemic of camera breaches, you should always weigh the convenience of these devices against the risk of someone getting control of the feed.
Like many monitors in this price range, the SafeVIEW provides a lot of bells and whistles: remote zoom, tilt and pan of the camera, two-way communication and a range of 900 feet so you don’t have to stress about chatting with your neighbor outside during naptime. The SafeVIEW also has a built-in nightlight that you can turn on and off using the monitor. And, if the monitor is going nuts every time a big truck drives by or during a thunderstorm, you can decrease its sound sensitivity to not pick up the background noise.
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