Most connected baby monitors are effectively just home security cameras, like the Nest Cam Indoor—devices that let you watch another location with color video, night vision, and sound, so you can tell if anything is amiss. Because baby monitors are used to keep an eye on your little one rather than on your home and property, they prioritize different features than security cameras.
Looking at other Wi-Fi–enabled models, we don’t recommend getting the Ezviz Mini, the Palermo Wi-Fi Video Baby Monitor, or the LeFun C2, all of which Amazon reviewers report have connectivity issues, among other problems. We dismissed another Wi-Fi monitor we tested—the Evoz Glow Baby Monitor—for being harder to set up than the iBaby monitor, our former recommendation, and for not being notably better than the iBaby in any other way.
If all you want is a no-fuss audio monitor, the Bump and Baldwin both recommend VTech’s DM221 audio monitor, which consistently garners a lot of accolades. Using digital audio technology, the DM221 offers clear audio transmission and eliminates the crackle of analog models. A two-way intercom allows you to talk to your baby, while a five-level sound indicator can visually alert you to cries from the other room. The transmitter also features a soft night-light for your child. And don’t sleep on its compact size, which makes it perfect for travel.
Users consistently report being impressed with the crystal-clear quality of the MoonyBaby monitor and the special features this particular model comes equipped with, including a baby room temperature display, zoom capabilities, a talk-back button, long-lasting battery life, and five soothing built-in lullabies. With so many advanced features and the ability to link to up to four cameras at once, it’s no wonder the MoonyBaby is on so many parents’ wish lists.
We tested monitors daily over a period of several months, in three houses: one nearly 100 years old with plaster walls, a newer home with standard drywall construction, and a two-level 1960s home with a driveway on another level from the kids’ rooms. We tried the Wi-Fi–enabled monitors with two routers, in separate test locations, to be sure that any connection issues were with the monitors themselves and not the Internet connection.

You can control the Arlo via multiple platforms, including Alexa, HomeKit, Google Assistant, and IFTTT. The camera itself can work wirelessly off a rechargeable battery for several hours (which no other monitor we’ve tested can do), and it can track and chart several days’ worth of temperature or humidity in a child’s room. You can set it to notify you if it detects unusual temperatures, humidity levels, or “air quality,” a VOC measure the Arlo Baby manual (PDF) suggests you alleviate by either opening a window or removing the source of the VOCs. (Our also-great pick for the best air purifier is one of the few that actually does genuinely eliminate VOCs, but it ain’t cheap.) If you find that the notifications are too frequent, you can adjust what’s triggering the alerts (by raising the threshold up to 80 ºF, for example, if you don’t want a notification telling you it’s too hot at 76 ºF). You can store video from the camera online, but in six years of parenthood we’ve never once wanted to review baby monitor footage.


Your baby needs constant attention, but you can't be in its room every hour of every day. That's what baby monitors are for. What started as audio-only infant care devices to let you listen in on your child from another room, have since added video cameras and connected features to the mix so you can always keep an eye on your little one. There are still some great audio monitors out there—here we're focusing on models that also provide some form of video feed.

The features we focused on were those we thought either increased the performance of the monitor or made it more user-friendly for parents and increased the odds of getting good quality sleep. We looked for monitors that have sound activation that keeps the parent unit quiet when the baby isn't crying, so parents can potentially fall asleep faster because they don't have to listen to white noise. Some of the monitors were so loud, even at low volumes, that the white noise might keep light sleeping parents awake; this defeats the purpose of having a video product to begin with. We also liked the models with screens that automatically "wake" and/or go to sleep.
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