The Infant Optics DXR-8 has some great benefits over the Motorola MBP36 as a luxury standalone. It has super sharp image and includes the ability to change lens. This one-of-a-kind feature could become especially useful when your little one gets more mobile and a wide-angle lens (sold separately for $12) is necessary. Unfortunately, some interference problems and poor range kept it from topping the Motorola MBP36 for our top luxury standalone.

Think about the size of your home and your daily routine when deciding which brand/model to buy. If you'll be making calls during nap time, for example, look for monitors with lights that let you know when your baby is awake. Of course you can accomplish the same thing by turning down the sound on a video monitor, but lights are more likely to catch your eye.
Here’s one situation when using this monitor may be a better idea for you: If you’re already using Arlo security cameras at home (and you have a baby—congrats!), you could buy this as a baby monitor now, then relocate it for use as a general security camera along with your other Arlo products when you’re through with monitoring your kid. Or if you’re in the market for an indoor security camera and you’re wondering how this could fit in, it’s worth considering our findings here alongside what we learned in our guide to wireless indoor home security cameras.
Unfortunately, picking up the Arlo for that super-brief check-in is rarely as simple as on a basic video monitor. The Arlo loses its connection routinely, for example. You sometimes have to log in to the app again. Or the app freezes, showing video from hours earlier, or crashes, at times because the app or your phone’s OS is due for an update. Or you pick up your phone to check on the kids and end up stressing out about some other notification you didn’t mean to see at 4 a.m.
The features we focused on were those we thought either increased the performance of the monitor or made it more user-friendly for parents and increased the odds of getting good quality sleep. We looked for monitors that have sound activation that keeps the parent unit quiet when the baby isn't crying, so parents can potentially fall asleep faster because they don't have to listen to white noise. Some of the monitors were so loud, even at low volumes, that the white noise might keep light sleeping parents awake; this defeats the purpose of having a video product to begin with. We also liked the models with screens that automatically "wake" and/or go to sleep.
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