Every parent we spoke to agreed. A video monitor is the way to go. It’s the difference between getting up to check on your baby because you thought you heard a noise or glancing at a screen to see if you really need to get out of bed. Video monitors are useful well into the toddler years, too. That screen can help you decide whether you need to step in and comfort your child, or if you can wait out a tantrum.
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To help you find the best video baby monitor for your family’s needs, we’ve outlined some key features to look for, and we will continue to share the results of our testing. Here are our current top picks, followed by a buyers' guide that will help you identify your wants and needs if our picks don't match what you're looking for. And if you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you'll find links to all of our latest video baby monitor reviews..
This is a powerful solution for the relatively computer savvy parents who want flexibility, accessibility, and convenience. This is not just a great baby monitor, this is a wireless video camera that can be placed anywhere and will communicate with computers and smart phones; many people even use it as a home security camera for its ease of use and placement, high-quality video, and as a monitor with night vision it is pretty unsurpassed. Install the Dropcam App and view your baby through your cell phone no matter where you are, or use it as a powerful security camera for when you're traveling or out of the house. Want to check in on the babysitter while you're out on date night to make sure your baby is napping on time? Want to move the camera to monitor the dog or your home while you're away? Easy, and with the 130-degree wide angle lens, you can place it in even small rooms and maintain a good field of view. If you're away from home, you can also set it up to alert you to any movement: it will send an alert to your phone (or an email) along with a photo of what's going on. Like many baby-oriented video monitors, it also supports two-way communication with a built-in microphone and speaker, has 8x digital zoom, and has great night vision. It also has 1080p quality video, day and night. But it's also a bit expensive for a camera-only system, coming in at about $165. This is a powerful and flexible system that has a very high-quality digital video color and night vision camera, a wide field of view, access to cloud computing, and tons of convenient bells and whistles. This is not your mom's baby monitor. However, there are some requirements here: you need wireless internet in your home, and it needs to be rather high speed to support streaming high-quality video and audio feeds. You also will need to load an app onto your phone (iPhone or Android) or a software package onto your computers (Windows or Macs) in order to access the device. If you ask us, this is one of the best and most flexible solutions for baby monitoring. It's a bit lower on our list because it's not technically a baby monitor so it doesn't include things like sleep mode (turn on only in response to noise), and of course there is no dedicated bed-side monitor for it. It's an all-purpose camera that you can place anywhere and use as a baby monitor when needed. We also don't like that you need to subscribe to the Nest Aware for $10/month if you want to remove annoying banner ads on the app or software package. After paying $165+ for this, you would think the app would be included without annoying ads?
Rather than requiring an independent video display, the Withings Home sends footage via the cloud to your iOS device (phone or tablet). Its HD video is sharp, colorful and on par with or better than any other camera in its class. And it’s loaded with useful features that feel like the future, like push notifications when your baby makes noise or moves, and the ability to monitor your baby with unlimited range through your smartphone’s data plan. And it was the only smartphone-based camera tested to have background-audio monitoring. (Most importantly, these features aren’t just features. They really work every bit as well as advertised!)
There are many factors to consider when purchasing a video monitor for your child. These products range in price from around $40 up into the hundreds, and they come with a variety of features, such as WiFi connectivity, dual cameras, long-range monitoring and more. The following is a breakdown of the top video baby monitors available and the best features of each option.
One of the biggest concerns with a baby monitor is going out of range and not hearing baby crying for you. Talk about a case of mom guilt! When shopping for the best long-range baby monitor, note that the range listed on the box doesn’t account for walls or doors; it’s a line-of-sight range. So, although you may not actually be able to travel 1,000 feet away from baby, you should be able to head to the basement to do laundry or be outside in the yard without worrying about missing baby’s cries.
Interchangeable Camera Lenses: Some of the newest baby monitors have interchangeable lenses to best suit your baby's room. If you have the camera positioned close to the baby, like on the edge of the crib or on a nearby dresser, you might prefer the wide angle camera. If you have the camera positioned relatively far from the baby, like on a bookshelf on the other side of the room, you might prefer the regular narrow angle camera. Flexibility is nice, particularly if you end up rearranging the room or have to move things out of the reach of a growing menace.
From a pure imaging standpoint, night vision is vital for watching your baby sleep from another room, and is standard for most baby monitors. Motorized pan and tilt (which lets you swivel the camera from afar) isn't quite as common, but is very welcome if you have a toddler and want to scan an entire room. High-definition is a nice plus, but you don't need the highest-resolution sensor to keep tabs on your baby—most of the monitors we test use 720p cameras rather than 1080p.

For the parent devices of dedicated monitors, the battery life ranged anywhere between 6.75 and 12.75 hours. The Wi-Fi options are harder to gauge given that the battery life depends on the kind of device used, whether or not it is being used for other applications simultaneously, and how old the battery is in the device. In general, however, we feel it is relatively safe to say that most will work longer than the best dedicated monitor battery if the device is dedicated for use with the monitor only and is not running other applications simultaneously.
The Infant Optics DXR-8 has superior battery life to any of the other video monitors we tested, as well as a simpler monitor interface that’s more intuitive and easier to navigate than those found on competitors. The range, image quality, price, and many other features are comparable to those of the best competitors. Other good qualities include its basic-but-secure RF connection, and ability to pair multiple cameras, but those are features common to several other baby monitors. Every baby monitor has its share of negative feedback, but among more than 24,000 Amazon reviews, the complaints about the Infant Optics are relatively mild.
General Usability: This one is two-fold. First we wanted to make sure each monitor could perform under bright, dim, and no light; and pick up even the faintest sounds. Then we looked at how easy it was to use the monitor. Could we adjust the screen brightness, or were we going to be half-blinded when we picked it up at 1AM? Was the monitor voice-activated, or does it pick up white noise in the background? How sensitive were the alarms, and did they sound like a baby-waking screech or a soft ping?
Interchangeable Camera Lenses: Some of the newest baby monitors have interchangeable lenses to best suit your baby's room. If you have the camera positioned close to the baby, like on the edge of the crib or on a nearby dresser, you might prefer the wide angle camera. If you have the camera positioned relatively far from the baby, like on a bookshelf on the other side of the room, you might prefer the regular narrow angle camera. Flexibility is nice, particularly if you end up rearranging the room or have to move things out of the reach of a growing menace.
For standalone monitors, we found that two features were nice to have: The first is VOX, which mutes the ambient sounds in a room entirely, activating the speaker (and often the video) only when significant sound is recognized. The second feature we appreciated was LED sound meters. These are an excellent, rare feature to keep constant tabs on a baby while muting a monitor and turning the video off (Consumer Reports appreciates these LEDs, too.)
Ease of setup and installation factored heavily into our ratings, including whether an account needed to be created and if there were any extra subscription fees necessary. Each unit had cords protruding out of its back, so design wasn't much of a factor in my choice, though parents should take care to keep dangling cords and wires away from their children's reach when setting up a monitor.
How far away baby's monitor can be from the parent unit is what determines a product's range. While many manufacturers offer a "line of sight" range to describe a monitor's range, it is not a good indication of how well it will work in your home with walls and interference. It doesn't matter how much you like a specific model or brand, if it doesn't work in your house, it simply isn't going to work. We tested both indoor range and open field tests to provide the best information, but remember that the values inside your home matter more than those in an open field, unless of course, you are leaving a baby alone in an open field (which we don't recommend).

For standalone monitors, we found that two features were nice to have: The first is VOX, which mutes the ambient sounds in a room entirely, activating the speaker (and often the video) only when significant sound is recognized. The second feature we appreciated was LED sound meters. These are an excellent, rare feature to keep constant tabs on a baby while muting a monitor and turning the video off (Consumer Reports appreciates these LEDs, too.)
Don’t worry if your Wi-Fi tends to be spotty because this monitor operates on a secure radio frequency. Parents applaud its long range — up to 590 feet — and sensitivity to sound no matter where they are in the house. And if you’re in a far-off room, you’ll still know the temperature in the nursery because it’s displayed on the screen at all times.
Using the speaker, you can tell the Project Nursery camera to pan and tilt, play a lullaby, check the temperature in the nursery and more. You can do all this from any room that has an Alexa-powered speaker, so that you don't need to enter the nursery and risk waking up your sleeping baby. If you already own an Echo speaker, Project Nursery sells the Alexa-enabled camera on its own.
Range: Range is the main drawback of an RF model, as audio monitors can roam farther out, and a Wi-Fi connection can theoretically be checked anywhere. We wanted an adequate range for a typical home—to be able to maintain a signal up or down a flight of stairs, across the house, and out on a patio or driveway, but we didn’t expect much beyond that. We zeroed in on monitors rated to about 700 feet of range or greater.1

Today’s best baby monitors are not your mama’s baby monitors! High-definition video monitoring is becoming the norm, and many baby monitors are now app-enabled or have wi-fi capabilities. Even basic audio monitors have stepped up their game, with many implementing DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) technology to eliminate the interference and the lack of security that comes from monitors using the 2.4 GHz frequency band. If you’ve ever heard your neighbors chatting through your baby monitor, you’ll appreciate this change! DECT also prevents super-creepy baby monitor hackers from spying on baby—or you!

In addition to the standard parent and baby unit, these monitors include a device that tracks your baby’s movements, breathing, or heart rate, and offer time-sensitive alarms that alert you if your baby hasn’t moved in the last 20–30 seconds. While they aren’t proven to reduce SIDS, many new parents told us these monitors gave them added peace of mind.
The longest battery life for the dedicated products in our review is the Levana Lila, which ran for 12.75 hours in full use mode. The manufacturer claims this unit will work up to 72 hours in power saving mode, but we only tested the monitors in full use. The Infant Optics DXR-8 came in second place with a shorter run time of closer to 11.5 hours. The Motorola MBP36S earned the lowest score for battery life with a runtime just under 7 hours. While not necessarily a deal breaker, there are plenty of other reasons to dislike the Motorola MBP36S, and the battery life is just a small part of a disappointing overall picture (no pun intended).
Even though the jury is still out on the effects of EMF on the human body, this doesn't mean parents need to wait for more definitive proof before making thoughtful adjustments that err on the side of caution. Given that exposure compounds over time and with an increased number of devices emitting, you can help limit baby's exposure by turning off devices when they are not in use, unplugging wireless routers at night while children sleep, and keeping products as far from your baby as possible when in use. Even if you are not convinced that there is potential for harm, it certainly can't hurt to make choices that potentially increase the health of your home.
Lullabies: Monitors often include a selection of soothing sounds to help your baby drift off to slumberland. These can be traditional nursery rhymes of the rock-a-bye-baby variety, nature sounds, white noise, or some combination of all of them. It’s a good idea to check them out before you play them to your sleeping child to determine whether they might help or hinder their sleep.

The Babysense 7 movement product is a sensor pad mattress product that isn't portable but seems to have fewer false alarms than wearable products. The BabySense 7 is easy to use and doesn't require much setup or preparation outside of placing the sensor and control unit. This unit even works well after your baby learns to roll over, unlike the wearable options that become less reliable as your little one's age.

The camera, which is the most elegant looking of the testing group, sits on a magnetic base that unfortunately cannot be mounted on the wall and must sit on a surface. The camera itself cannot be tilted or panned. It can only be adjusted manually within the concave base—meaning it can be pointed downward, at least a little bit, but its wide-angle lens lessens the needs for dramatic angle adjustments. The unit also include a “privacy mode” where the decorative cover can be rotated to block the camera and signal it to not record any audio or video.
Bargain hunters may prefer the iBaby M6T. Though it's a couple years old and records video in in 720p resolution, it's still a capable monitor with night vision, two-way audio and helpful pan-and-tilt capabilities. It's also available for nearly $100 less than the Arlo Baby. If the voice-powered Alexa assistant is a part of your family, consider the Project Nursery Smart Baby Monitor, which includes a smart speaker in its $229 bundle that lets you remote control the camera.

One other difference between the Arlo and the Infant Optics is either a dealbreaker, or it’s insignificant, depending on how you plan to use your monitor. The Arlo cannot pan or tilt like the Infant Optics can, so once it’s fixed in a position, that’s your view. It has a wide enough field of vision to see a good portion of a 10-by-10 room, and it includes a wall-mounting plate for more versatile mounting options. (By the way, as you see in our photos, you can also remove those decorative rabbit ears and feet, if they’re obstructing a sight line, or if you just want it to look less like a toy and more like a camera.) If you’re in a smaller space where a fixed-point view might not be able to see the whole bed (or room), and especially if you’re planning on panning the camera to check on multiple kids sharing a room, you’ll almost definitely want the Infant Optics instead.
The Nest Cam lets you view live video in 1080-pixel high definition, and it has many of the same features as a standard video baby monitor. For instance, it can alert you in the event of movement, and there’s a two-way talk function built in. Nest Cams also have impressive night vision, allowing you to check in on your little ones as they sleep. Because this camera uses WiFi to send you video, there’s no range limit on it — as long as both the phone and camera are connected to the internet, you’ll be able to see what’s going on.
Netgear brought the best features of its Arlo line of home security cameras to its first baby monitor. That includes Full HD video, night vision, sound and motion detection, two-way audio, 24/7 recording, and free cloud storage. Netgear also used feedback from Arlo owners to add a nursery-centric spin to the Arlo Baby, with a multicolored LED nightlight, a built-in music player with nine lullabies, environmental sensors, and artificial intelligence that can recognize your child’s cries.
A baby monitor's job is to transmit recognizable sound and, in the case of video models, images. The challenge is to find a monitor that works with minimal interference—static, buzzing, or irritating noise—from other nearby electronic products and transmitters, including older cordless phones that might use the same frequency bands as your monitor.
In addition to monitoring your kids, you can use the camera’s two-way talk to soothe your child (smart for when you sleep train), and it also comes with Intelligent Motion Alerts to let you know if something’s happening in the room. You can also choose to record video footage on an SD card (not included) if you want to use this product as a nanny cam.

Rechargeable batteries: Since the camera will most likely stay trained on your bundle of joy, it can remain plugged into AC power. But parent unit displays are designed to be always on and carried with you as you move from room to room. That can drain batteries quickly. Look for a parent unit that runs on rechargeable batteries, so you’re not constantly swapping them out.
Last, a few features are simply not that useful, but they’re more like unnecessary clutter than legitimate flaws. The talk-back feature can be difficult to understand on the baby end of the line (we found that it works best—that is, intelligibly—if you speak about a foot away from the microphone, and avoid shouting). A “shortcut” button to control the monitor’s volume and brightness doesn’t really save you much time. There are other features on the menu—with the little songs, a timer, and a zoom, you have a total of about seven. But honestly, after testing this monitor for some time and others for years longer, the only thing you really need to be able to do regularly is adjust the volume.
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