Intuitive and User-Friendly Menu and Features: What good are 25 fancy features if you can't figure out how to navigate the menu and customize settings or change options? All of the best baby monitors reviewed above have great utility, with high video quality and a nice feature set, but some of them have relatively high usability, which comes in handy when you don't want to spend too much time shuffling through menus to change one silly setting.
Last, a few features are simply not that useful, but they’re more like unnecessary clutter than legitimate flaws. The talk-back feature can be difficult to understand on the baby end of the line (we found that it works best—that is, intelligibly—if you speak about a foot away from the microphone, and avoid shouting). A “shortcut” button to control the monitor’s volume and brightness doesn’t really save you much time. There are other features on the menu—with the little songs, a timer, and a zoom, you have a total of about seven. But honestly, after testing this monitor for some time and others for years longer, the only thing you really need to be able to do regularly is adjust the volume.
Our hands-on reviews put 32 video baby monitors to the test, examining their features, image clarity (day and night vision), convenience, reliability, safety, the range of reception, and versatility. We came away with over 15 of the top baby monitors of the year, including the top-ranked Infant Optics monitor to the super versatile Project Nursery monitor.
Relatively new to the market, this Philips Avent baby monitor has some really great features. Philips Avent has a long history of making high-quality baby gear and home products, including their great (non-video) DECT monitor, and this one is no exception. When we unpacked this baby monitor, it took us about 20 seconds to set up. We put the screen unit in the dining room and the camera in the nursery. Plug both of them in and you're off to the races. The digital color screen looks very good, with a high resolution 720p, and pretty good night vision. If you can't see closely enough, you can remotely zoom in by about 2x; but note that if it's not lined up perfectly this won't be so helpful since you can't remotely pan or tilt the camera to get your baby into view. Some additional features include private, secure connection, and very clear sound so you can hear your baby's every little peep. One of our favorite features was the ECO mode, which saves power in the screen unit by shutting off the screen and sound. Only when it detects a sound from your baby will it turn on to notify you. This is a great feature when you're using the hand-held screen unit with battery only, unplugged from the charger. Though we'd probably never need it, you can also remotely turn on some soothing lullabies (twinkle-twinkle, rock-a-bye baby, etc). Limitations? Well, the Philips Avent doesn't let you add multiple cameras, and the video quality isn't quite on par with some of our better-ranked units. It's high resolution digital color video, but if the signal and screen quality aren't so great (in terms of contrast, brightness, signal strength, etc) then it won't look very nice. Overall, however, a highly recommended video monitor that deserves its place on this best baby monitor list, from a company with a good track record of making safe and reliable baby products.
The most troubling pattern you see in the one-star Amazon reviews is the reports of battery life declining (or failing) over time. This is part of a larger trend in baby monitors in general, and our take on it is that the battery tech within these monitors is just not at the level people have come to expect after living with good phones and tablets and other quality electronics. Reading the negative reviews for this and many other monitors reminded us of the kinds of problems people had with rechargeable batteries years ago. Here’s a good example of what we mean. So for now, for any baby monitor, set your expectations accordingly.
The air-quality feature monitors Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) levels. These are organic chemicals like acetone or benzene. The EPA says these chemicals are found in paints, paint strippers, aerosols, cleaners, disinfectants, solvents, etc and can cause serious health issues including eye, nose, and throat irritation; headaches, loss of coordination, nausea; damage to liver, kidney, and central nervous system and even cancer. The Home will alert you to high VOC levels, which indicates it may be time to open a window or increase air circulation in your house. It does not monitor carbon monoxide.
The Cocoon Cam’s standout feature is its ability to monitor a baby’s breathing. It sounds appealing—most parents worry about this with newborns—but our reluctance to consider this item goes back to two details that set the Arlo apart from other Wi-Fi options. First, the Cocoon app has weak reviews, and second, there’s less evidence that this company can keep your data secure than you can expect with Arlo, maker of a widely adopted security camera platform.
The Philips Avent SCD630 earned a 4th place rank, but it is the number 1 ranked dedicated monitor we tested. It has the longest range and highest ease of use scores for the dedicated options and the best score for sound clarity out of all the monitors we tested in this review. The Philips has lullabies, a nightlight, 2-way talk to baby, automatic screen wakeup/sleep, sound activation, 2x zoom, and a temperature sensor. While it struggles to offer true to life images and has fewer features than most of the competition, it is hard to deny that this plug and play monitor is a simple solution for video baby monitoring, and it gets the job done with little fuss and only a small learning curve. However, if you want a remote-controlled camera, you should look elsewhere, as this one is manual with a smaller field of view.
The Nest Cam Indoor Wi-Fi and the LeFun C2 720P Wi-Fi came in a close second to the iBaby M6S Wi-Fi for features, both scoring an 8 of 10. Because these cameras are designed more with surveillance in mind and are not solely marketed for baby, they have several features that make parents lives easier, but not anything fancy and fun for baby. They do offer 2-way communication, but no lullabies or environmental sensors. Given that many parents already have "noise makers" (aka lullabies) covered by way of another product, the lack of this feature isn't a deal breaker in our book. So while these Wi-Fi cameras lacked the gadgetry fun of humidity sensing and the other bells of the iBaby M6S Wi-Fi, they still got the job of monitoring done in a way that is easy for parents to use. The bonus of the Nest Cam Indoor Wi-Fi camera is that it can be used for multiple applications when baby gets older and no longer needs an overnight monitor. This monitor can easily shift for use as a nanny cam, security, or pet camera. We think this takes the sting (if there is some) out of its lack of baby fun features, which in the end, most parents usually stop using when the novelty wears off.

Alex Colon is the managing editor of PCMag's consumer electronics team. He previously covered mobile technology for PCMag and Gigaom. Though he does the majority of his reading and writing on various digital displays, Alex still loves to sit down with a good, old-fashioned, paper and ink book in his free time. (Not that there's anything wrong wit... See Full Bio
Microphone sensitivity: There’s a difference between hearing your baby cry, and hearing every little noise. All baby monitors have the option to turn down the volume, but some offer thresholds for parents who are more comfortable with only hearing the biggest upsets, and prefer not to hear the self-comforting noises their baby makes as they fall asleep.

The Samsung SEW-3043W BrightView HD's primary advantages over our pick are a larger, crisper display and a sleeker-looking package overall. But it is not our pick because its main disadvantage—a slow and unresponsive touchscreen—is such an annoying flaw that we're sure you'd prefer our pick's reliable tactile controls. The Samsung also falls short of our pick on battery life and because of other long-term battery and charging issues. On many other measures, the two monitors came out more or less even.


The Babysense 7 movement product is a sensor pad mattress product that isn't portable but seems to have fewer false alarms than wearable products. The BabySense 7 is easy to use and doesn't require much setup or preparation outside of placing the sensor and control unit. This unit even works well after your baby learns to roll over, unlike the wearable options that become less reliable as your little one's age.
Searching for a big-screen video baby monitor that will stay put in one place, like on your bedside table, in the kitchen, or living room? And won't break the bank? Then this is the one for you. It has a sleek and truly large 7" display, that looks like a digital picture frame, and is about the size of an iPad Mini. We found the video to have a great quality signal, the monitor to be high resolution for good visibility, and the night vision to work reasonably well (it's grayscale, not greens, but still sufficient to watch baby sleep or check status). It was also really easy to setup, simply plug in the camera, and plug in the video monitor, and you're all set. It comes with great features: it has an integrated two-way audio intercom system, a sleep mode that dims the screen but leaves on the audio, adjustable volume, and adjustable wireless channels to ensure signal clarity even with interference from other devices. In our test, we found everything in this baby monitor system really easy to learn and use, and really enjoyed the "talk" feature that allowed us to talk to our baby in the other room. There were three primary drawbacks, however: first, it is a stationary system, meaning that the display does not have a battery. This is the biggest drawback relative to the above systems. You can move it from room to room, however, as long as you bring the (albeit short) power cord. Second, unlike most others on this list, it does not allow you to remotely control the camera tilt or zoom. Finally, the overall quality isn't up to par with the others on the list. The sound quality wasn't so great, the image sometimes choppy, and the night vision somewhat poor quality relative to others. Overall, it has some great features, and if you're looking to save a bunch of money for a decent video monitor that isn't super versatile, this is one of the best baby monitors for bang for the buck!  
Traditional versus Wifi Baby Monitors: Starting around 2010, parents began to switch from using baby monitors with a yoked camera and screen, to using wifi cameras that can stream over smart phones, tablets, and personal computers. At the time, there weren't very many wifi cameras aimed towards the baby gear market, so people were going with familiar wifi camera brands like Nest and Samsung. Over the next few years, companies slowly began introducing baby-themed wifi cameras onto the market. While even high-quality HD wifi cameras can be found for under $50 (like this one) nowadays, companies began to realize they could package a wifi camera as a baby monitor, change the colors and themes of the app, and charge 3-4 times the price. And they continue to use this strategy to this day! So which is better? Well, this really comes down to one thing: do you want to be able to view the nursery while you're not at home? If you answer yes to this question, then you need to use a wifi monitor as opposed to a typical baby monitor. A wifi baby monitor (or any wifi camera) will connect to your internet (some are wired, some through wifi only) and stream live (well, slightly delated) video to an app on your phone. That will work in the house or out of the house, as long as you have a fast internet connection. So you can simply BYOP (bring your own phone) and leverage 20th century technology! That seems really appealing, and we highly recommend some of the newer ones (like the Cocoon Cam, Lollipop, and Nanit), but there are some things to keep in mind when figuring out the type of monitor to buy:
Why spend money on a baby monitor, which serves a single specific purpose, when you could use an indoor home-security camera that you can repurpose once your kid leaves the nursery? We wondered the same thing, so along with with dedicated video baby monitors, we tested a Nest Indoor Cam, currently among our top-rated wireless home security cameras.

We took these criteria into consideration, factored in user feedback and reviews from across the Web, and eventually narrowed the list to eight cameras for testing. We used each camera for several months, taking notes on the interface and any difficulties we ran into. We connected each model to multiple routers, and used each from various distances and through walls to test range. We also ran each monitor from a full charge down to zero to check battery life. Finally, we evaluated each monitor's night vision in dark environments. Read more about our tests in our full guide to baby monitors.
For the parent devices of dedicated monitors, the battery life ranged anywhere between 6.75 and 12.75 hours. The Wi-Fi options are harder to gauge given that the battery life depends on the kind of device used, whether or not it is being used for other applications simultaneously, and how old the battery is in the device. In general, however, we feel it is relatively safe to say that most will work longer than the best dedicated monitor battery if the device is dedicated for use with the monitor only and is not running other applications simultaneously.
The push notifications were a great way to keep tabs on the little one but not perfect. False alerts happened (e.g., shifting sunlight through the blinds dinged be a motion alert), but that was consistent with all of the smartphone-based monitors. Push notifications can sometimes make a parent feel blasé, but in practice, they make you no less attentive.

This is an awesome and versatile option for anyone looking for a video baby monitor that uses your existing device (Android, iPhone, iPad) as the screen. Simply plug it in, install the app on your phone, and you're off to the races! And it has tons of great features. You can stream high definition (720p) daytime or nighttime (night vision) video and audio, or use audio monitor only. It can send sound and motion alerts right to your device. It has two-way (intercom style) talk, so you can listen to your baby and your baby can listen to you. Unique on this list, it also has time-lapse video so you can review what your little one was up to during the night - watch them roll around and hug their blankies and lovies! When we tested this unit, this time-lapse review was my favorite feature! It also has remote pan and tilt, so if it's not in the perfect position (or your baby isn't!) you can remotely move the camera to get a better view. It also has some unique access features. For example, it uses highly secure encrypted data transmission and allows more than one app user to watch simultaneously (so mom can watch from work while grandma puts baby down for a nap!). That's a lot of awesome features for this compact baby monitoring system that can double as a security camera, and it only runs about $100 online. That's cheaper than most others on this list - but remember, it does not come with a screen, so you need to use your own device. We tested it on a Samsung Galaxy S5, iPhone 5, iPad, and an LG G4 phone. It worked really well on all of them, so we were impressed. So why isn't this higher on our list? Only because it's not an all-in-one package and you need to install the app and use your own device to watch the video. Also, the software is a bit cumbersome to set up. For instance, if your wifi name has any spaces or special characters in it, it won't recognize it at all, you will need to rename your wireless network. Fortunately that's rare but did affect our testing. We saw some good connectivity performance, with it rarely dropping off our wifi. Overall, we like it, and it deserves this (albeit low) position on our best baby monitor list!

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