Here’s one situation when using this monitor may be a better idea for you: If you’re already using Arlo security cameras at home (and you have a baby—congrats!), you could buy this as a baby monitor now, then relocate it for use as a general security camera along with your other Arlo products when you’re through with monitoring your kid. Or if you’re in the market for an indoor security camera and you’re wondering how this could fit in, it’s worth considering our findings here alongside what we learned in our guide to wireless indoor home security cameras.
We tested each product we purchased in key metrics that allow them to function as expected, or provides an additional feature or benefit. Monitors act as something of a lifeline for parents, so it is important that they work well, have adequate range, provide useful images, and are easy to use. If a product doesn't work well enough to instill confidence, then it will fail to offer parents the one thing they really want, more sleep.
You can control the Arlo via multiple platforms, including Alexa, HomeKit, Google Assistant, and IFTTT. The camera itself can work wirelessly off a rechargeable battery for several hours (which no other monitor we’ve tested can do), and it can track and chart several days’ worth of temperature or humidity in a child’s room. You can set it to notify you if it detects unusual temperatures, humidity levels, or “air quality,” a VOC measure the Arlo Baby manual (PDF) suggests you alleviate by either opening a window or removing the source of the VOCs. (Our also-great pick for the best air purifier is one of the few that actually does genuinely eliminate VOCs, but it ain’t cheap.) If you find that the notifications are too frequent, you can adjust what’s triggering the alerts (by raising the threshold up to 80 ºF, for example, if you don’t want a notification telling you it’s too hot at 76 ºF). You can store video from the camera online, but in six years of parenthood we’ve never once wanted to review baby monitor footage.

Electromagnetic fields (EMF), or dirty electricity, is something we think needs to be discussed when talking about wireless baby monitors. Given that all wireless devices give off some level of EMF, we feel it would be negligent not to discuss the potential for possible health risks associated with the kind of radiation emitted by wireless products. While the jury is still out, and studies being done are not conclusive yet, there is enough evidence that EMF might potentially cause health problems that we feel it is better to be cautious when it comes to children's exposure than to ignore the possibilities.


This option doesn't have sound activation, so there is has some noise all the time similar to white noise. This sound may not be a deal breaker if it comes from a fan or noise maker in baby's room and some parents may even find the sound helpful for sleeping or reassuring them that the unit is working. The DM111 is an excellent choice for families on a budget who want to hear the baby and don't need all the frills commonly found in more expensive choices.
Among the negative reviews, the most consistent complaint has to do with connectivity issues—either difficulty linking up initially or randomly dropping the connection while in use. These represent a slim minority among mostly positive reviews, and we did not have similar issues during our test. One consequence of losing the connection (whether it’s by a dropped link or via manually unplugging the camera) is that disconnecting causes the parent unit to emit a sharp, loud, repetitive beep. It is annoying—especially so if it happens in the middle of the night—but you won’t hear it under normal circumstances.
Baby monitors may have a visible signal as well as repeating the sound. This is often in the form of a set of lights to indicate the noise level, allowing the device to be used when it is inappropriate or impractical for the receiver to play the sound. Other monitors have a vibrating alert on the receiver making it particularly useful for people with hearing difficulties.
There are two basic types: audio and video/audio. Some are analog, others are digital. All monitors operate within a selected radio frequency band to send sound from a baby's room to a receiver in another room. Each monitor consists of a transmitter (the child/nursery unit) and one or more receivers. Prices range from about $25 to $150 for audio monitors and about $80 to $300 for audio/video monitors.
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