Compared with other Wi-Fi–enabled video monitors, the Arlo has advantages. As a product from a reputable manufacturer of home-security cameras—another Arlo model is an also-great pick in our guide to the best outdoor security cameras—the Arlo’s hardware and app support have a larger owner base and a longer track record than similar platforms supporting more recently launched baby monitors. You can see the difference in comparing the tens of thousands of satisfied reviews on Arlo’s app to the weak handful of reviews you typically see about Wi-Fi–enabled competitors. Those Arlo app reviews, which span over two dozen updates dating back to 2016, suggest a history of successful app support and satisfied customers. We often see promising new Wi-Fi monitors emerge, and we consider all of them fairly, but until they withstand the test of time like Arlo has, it’s hard to justify recommending any of them over the more proven option.
Most monitors (including our pick) are designed for use at home, usually while the baby is less than a few hundred feet away, well within range of a local video stream that bypasses the Internet. But many people want to use the monitor remotely—either to see what’s happening at home while they’re at work, traveling, or out on a date. For those needs, a Wi-Fi–enabled monitor, like our also-great pick, is the way to go. A Wi-Fi–enabled model works fine at home, too, but it’s not quite as simple as one that skips the routine connection and login hassles, as well as the potential security concerns, of a Web-based video option.
For standalone monitors, we found that two features were nice to have: The first is VOX, which mutes the ambient sounds in a room entirely, activating the speaker (and often the video) only when significant sound is recognized. The second feature we appreciated was LED sound meters. These are an excellent, rare feature to keep constant tabs on a baby while muting a monitor and turning the video off (Consumer Reports appreciates these LEDs, too.)
Internet speed is a challenge with wifi cameras and wifi baby monitors: people want cameras with high definition video (720p or 1080p), but most internet connections are nowhere near fast enough to stream that high-quality video in real time. So parents get really frustrated with their HD wifi baby monitors because they find the video choppy, laggy, and unreliable. Most modern wifi cameras allow you to lower the resolution of the video so you can still see your baby, but not in high def.
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To help you find the best video baby monitor for your family’s needs, we’ve outlined some key features to look for, and we will continue to share the results of our testing. Here are our current top picks, followed by a buyers' guide that will help you identify your wants and needs if our picks don't match what you're looking for. And if you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you'll find links to all of our latest video baby monitor reviews..
Baby monitors shouldn't be used as a substitute for adult supervision. They should be considered as an extra set of ears—and, in some cases, eyes—that help parents and caregivers keep tabs on sleeping babies. Using one can alert you to a situation before it becomes serious, for example, if your baby is coughing, crying, or making some other sign of distress. Experts warn that you can't rely on a monitor to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).
Range: Range is the main drawback of an RF model, as audio monitors can roam farther out, and a Wi-Fi connection can theoretically be checked anywhere. We wanted an adequate range for a typical home—to be able to maintain a signal up or down a flight of stairs, across the house, and out on a patio or driveway, but we didn’t expect much beyond that. We zeroed in on monitors rated to about 700 feet of range or greater.1
Don’t worry if your Wi-Fi tends to be spotty because this monitor operates on a secure radio frequency. Parents applaud its long range — up to 590 feet — and sensitivity to sound no matter where they are in the house. And if you’re in a far-off room, you’ll still know the temperature in the nursery because it’s displayed on the screen at all times.
If you hope to keep tabs on your little one while snoozing there are a few different options depending on what your goals are or what information you hope to have. The traditional baby monitoring device was designed to tell parents what was going on in the room as far as a baby crying or needing assistance. Since then, monitoring products have evolved into seeing the baby and even knowing if your baby is moving. Knowing which products do what can help you determine which type meets your goals and is right for your family.
There are several criteria on which the Arlo does have a clear advantage over our pick. The video quality is much better (to be frank, the video quality on the Infant Optics, though passable for a basic night-vision camera, is laughable by modern smartphone standards). Zooming on the Arlo camera is a more intuitive pinch motion. And, obviously, being able to check in remotely on the video stream is invaluable for a working or traveling parent who wants to see a child while away; our local-video-feed monitor can’t offer that. The option to store video in the cloud is another advantage here that you don’t get with our pick. In other ways they’re equal—both offer temperature monitoring (the Arlo’s is more detailed, with humidity and vague “air quality” readings), both have talk-back features, both can play little tunes for your kid, both have kind of cryptic control icons to activate these features. The Arlo, unlike the Infant Optics, has a multicolored night-light option that sounds gimmicky but is actually quite beautiful and fun for a kid’s room.
Its parent display unit is the smallest we tested, with a screen only 2.4 inches wide, but the video quality was among the best. By comparison, Infant Optics’ bigger screen didn’t offer a better picture, and our Motorola model had an obvious two-second delay — even when we took it off WiFi and used its direct signal mode to rule out connectivity issues. The differences are slight, but we were impressed that the HelloBaby could keep up with monitors twice its price. 

Most monitor systems have an electrical cord or nonrechargeable battery option for the unit in the baby's room. And receivers typically have an electrical cord or rechargeable batteries. Some models are notorious for burning through batteries at an alarming rate. Parents have complained that even monitors sold with rechargeable batteries built in can drain quickly. Our Baby Monitor Ratings , available to subscribers, include an evaluation of battery life. Subscribers can also check out our battery report and Ratings (for subscribers).
The Arlo’s security with your data is an issue more fully addressed in our guides to outdoor security cameras and indoor security cameras. But in reporting on the security of Wi-Fi–enabled baby monitors general, we’ve found that the overall likelihood of someone hacking into your baby monitor is remote, but it’s possible, Mark Stanislav, director of security engineering at Duo Security, told us in an interview. You’re relying on the security of your own home network and also the ability of the manufacturer to secure all of its devices, added Stanislav, who was also involved in Rapid7’s research into the vulnerabilities of Wi-Fi–enabled monitors.
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