If you want to know everything about your baby, down to the heartbeat — the Angelcare AC315 is our top motion-sensor monitor. The sensor mat slips under the mattress in your baby’s crib, and if it detects no movement after 20 seconds, it sends a loud alarm to the baby and parent units. Its touchscreen can be a little finicky. The Baby Delight is less prone to false alarms; however, our parent testers were concerned that the small clip-on sensor might be a choking hazard.
Baby's exposure could potentially be even lower if parents place the camera on a wall at least 15 feet from baby (a distance still good for night vision to work properly with most monitors). Given the sensitivity of baby's developing systems we recommend placing the monitor as far away from the baby as possible while still being able to utilize the night vision as intended and see baby's face to determine if they are awake or sleeping at a glance. For most of the products, this distance is between 10-15 feet from the baby.

Encrypted Wireless Communications: Here's something creepy and strange - there are reports of people tapping into even the best baby monitors and getting some bizarre pleasure from watching your baby sleep or watching you feed the baby in the middle of the night. A few of the manufacturers have included wireless encryption on their systems to make this much less likely.
The Philips Avent DECT SCD570/10 is a sleek looking, quality sound device that has a more extended range than much of the sound competition. It has a battery life of over 30 hours and excellent sound clarity for true-to-life sounds. The nursery unit has a nightlight, lullabies, mic sensitivity function, and a 2way talk to baby feature providing the most popular features for today's demanding parents.
While buying an audio-only monitor in 2018 is slightly akin to buying a flip phone, the Philips Avent has pretty much all the same features as top-of-the-line camera baby monitors, sans camera. Even better, it uses DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Communications) technology to guarantee zero interference ⏤ so it won’t get crossed with other signals in your house and/or your neighbor’s cordless phone. The Philips has a range of more than 90-ft inside, a 10-hour battery life, and it uses a “cry mode” so you’re only alerted to real cries for attention rather than background noise. As for extra features, it includes a night light, in-room temperature monitor, and plays lullabies ⏤ if only you could just see the baby.
Eufy, a company known for its robot vacuum cleaners, is branching into baby monitors with the new $135 Security SpaceView monitor. The monitor comes with a handheld display featuring a 5-inch LCD screen and enough battery power to let you check in on the nursery throughout the day. We're waiting to get our hands on the Security SpaceView camera, but with 330-degree tilt and 110-degree pan, it sounds like there's little that will escape the 702p camera's view. Other features include night vision, noise alerts and two-way talk. Stand by for a full review.
Wondering what's happening in your baby's room when you aren't there? Worried you won't know if they need your help in the middle of the night? Whether you want to keep tabs on baby's breathing or you're just looking for a good night's sleep knowing your little one is under surveillance, then a baby monitor is what you need. We've researched and tested every type of monitoring product before choosing over 40 models to test, making us uniquely qualified to help you find the right monitor for your wallet and your needs. With information on ease of use, range, features, and sound and visual quality, we have all the details you'll need to make a great buy.

Alex Colon is the managing editor of PCMag's consumer electronics team. He previously covered mobile technology for PCMag and Gigaom. Though he does the majority of his reading and writing on various digital displays, Alex still loves to sit down with a good, old-fashioned, paper and ink book in his free time. (Not that there's anything wrong wit... See Full Bio

Though we feel that the image quality on the Infant Optics is adequate, it’s hardly impressive by current (or even recent) standards. You can capably check to see if your kid is in bed and sleeping soundly, but you’re not going to see a little trail of drool trickling out of their mouth. If you want a crisper, clearer image, your best option is our Wi-Fi–enabled also-great pick, the Arlo Baby, a model we feel has a few shortcomings that put the Infant Optics above it in spite of our pick’s weaker image quality.


Dropcam Pro ($200) — The Dropcam Pro was The Nightlight’s first top pick, but was bumped down due to its limited app functionality. If you’re an Android user, or interested in ponying up for the Nest Aware service (prices begin at $10 per month), this is a very good alternative pick and includes one feature the Withings Home lacks: zoned alerts (where you can just receive alerts for the crib, for example).
Ease of use may not seem like a big deal because once you know how to use something, it won't seem that hard, and after you use it for a while it can feel intuitive even if it isn't. However, with this type of product, there can be a learning curve depending on what kind you choose and how many features it has. While the dedicated monitors were plug in and go options that even grandma can manage, some of them took a little more skill to navigate and learn. The Wi-Fi options, on the other hand, do require some knowledge of technology and the way apps work. With all of them, you will need to set up the camera with your computer or another device, and you will need to set up an account and be able to manage things like Wi-Fi passwords and various settings inside the application. While this may seem like no big deal to some parents, it could be challenging for those that are less tech-savvy.
Compared with other Wi-Fi–enabled video monitors, the Arlo has advantages. As a product from a reputable manufacturer of home-security cameras—another Arlo model is an also-great pick in our guide to the best outdoor security cameras—the Arlo’s hardware and app support have a larger owner base and a longer track record than similar platforms supporting more recently launched baby monitors. You can see the difference in comparing the tens of thousands of satisfied reviews on Arlo’s app to the weak handful of reviews you typically see about Wi-Fi–enabled competitors. Those Arlo app reviews, which span over two dozen updates dating back to 2016, suggest a history of successful app support and satisfied customers. We often see promising new Wi-Fi monitors emerge, and we consider all of them fairly, but until they withstand the test of time like Arlo has, it’s hard to justify recommending any of them over the more proven option.

Some audio/video monitors filter out "normal" sounds and motions. The receiver is supposed to turn on only when your baby makes an unusual motion or sound, such as crying or rolling over when he's waking up from a nap. This feature is designed to extend battery life, although the receiver should be docked for overnight monitoring to keep the battery charged. We haven't tested any models with this feature, so we don't know how well it works.

The Infant Optics DXR-8 has some great benefits over the Motorola MBP36 as a luxury standalone. It has super sharp image and includes the ability to change lens. This one-of-a-kind feature could become especially useful when your little one gets more mobile and a wide-angle lens (sold separately for $12) is necessary. Unfortunately, some interference problems and poor range kept it from topping the Motorola MBP36 for our top luxury standalone.
Video products add the element of visual peeking on your baby, so you can see if your baby is crying but calming down without you or if you need to make your way to their side. Most video products work well in the dark and have adequate sound so you can see and hear what is happening in the room. Some options are dedicated with a camera that talks to a parent unit, like the Levana Lila while others use your Wi-Fi to send information from the camera to your personal device like the Nest Cam. Wi-Fi options are great for larger houses where range could be an issue, and it's also nice for away from home monitoring. While video images are not mandatory for getting a good night's sleep, they do provide more information that can help you determine your little one's needs before you get out of bed. With the price of video products being lower than ever, it is no longer considered a luxury product and many parents are choosing this style over sound only products. However, proceed with caution! Spying on your newborn can be addictive and lead to less sleep which defeats the purpose of a getting a monitoring device in the first place.
For parents who want to monitor their baby’s cries from the office, or the gym, or Tahiti, the BB-8-looking iBaby M6S syncs right up to your house Wi-Fi connection ⏤ so instead of using a dedicated handheld receiver, you watch all the action on a smartphone app. It offers impressive 1080p HD video (with record function), a 360-degree view with 110-degree tilt, and an array of high-tech sensors including motion, sound, in-room temperature, air quality, and humidity. The only thing it seemingly won’t do is fix your X-Wing fighter. Although it makes up for it with night vision, two-way talk, and 10 programmed lullabies and bedtime stories, to which you can even add your own voice.

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