Like most Wi-Fi–enabled monitors, the Arlo Baby offers several capabilities you won’t get with a simpler RF video monitor like our pick. You can access the camera remotely via your smartphone (or computer), you don’t need to worry about finding and charging a dedicated monitor, the video quality is far superior, and you can even store video online if you want. The Arlo is part of a robust, reliable security camera network, with more consistent app support and customer service than its Wi-Fi monitor peers. If you already use and love Arlo products, this could be a logical addition to your home-monitoring setup. Yet when you get down to actually using the product in the usual circumstances—at night, in the background, mostly on audio, with the occasional video check-in—you’re not really thinking about all of those features. That’s because you’re too busy trying to reestablish the connection and remain logged in! At times, relying on the Arlo means accepting a level of inconvenience our relatively simple RF video pick never puts you through.
Ease of use may not seem like a big deal because once you know how to use something, it won't seem that hard, and after you use it for a while it can feel intuitive even if it isn't. However, with this type of product, there can be a learning curve depending on what kind you choose and how many features it has. While the dedicated monitors were plug in and go options that even grandma can manage, some of them took a little more skill to navigate and learn. The Wi-Fi options, on the other hand, do require some knowledge of technology and the way apps work. With all of them, you will need to set up the camera with your computer or another device, and you will need to set up an account and be able to manage things like Wi-Fi passwords and various settings inside the application. While this may seem like no big deal to some parents, it could be challenging for those that are less tech-savvy.

Most people want to use a monitor at home, overnight, with audio on in the background, checking in on the video signal only occasionally. Our pick makes that task simpler and more reliable than an Internet-connected monitor. But if you regularly want to access the monitor while away from home, the Arlo Baby is the best Wi-Fi–equipped option. Whether you’re at home or away, the Arlo streams exceptionally sharp video to your smartphone’s Arlo app, and can save clips too. Unlike other Wi-Fi–enabled monitors, the Arlo also has the advantage of a longer track record, larger owner base, consistent app support, and strong reviews, as well as the rare ability to stream audio in the background with the phone screen off. But Arlo’s reliance on your phone and an Internet connection creates its own annoyances. It has routine issues with maintaining a connection and staying logged in. Additionally, glancing at your phone to check on the baby often comes with a side of unrelated and unwelcome push notifications.
Its parent display unit is the smallest we tested, with a screen only 2.4 inches wide, but the video quality was among the best. By comparison, Infant Optics’ bigger screen didn’t offer a better picture, and our Motorola model had an obvious two-second delay — even when we took it off WiFi and used its direct signal mode to rule out connectivity issues. The differences are slight, but we were impressed that the HelloBaby could keep up with monitors twice its price.

Here’s one situation when using this monitor may be a better idea for you: If you’re already using Arlo security cameras at home (and you have a baby—congrats!), you could buy this as a baby monitor now, then relocate it for use as a general security camera along with your other Arlo products when you’re through with monitoring your kid. Or if you’re in the market for an indoor security camera and you’re wondering how this could fit in, it’s worth considering our findings here alongside what we learned in our guide to wireless indoor home security cameras.
Many parents find that a basic sound product more than meets their needs. They plan to run to baby's aid each time they hear them cry, and they don't need to spy on their baby with video. Using a sound option is the cheapest way to go to get a quality product that works well. However, if you need or want to see your baby, then a video option is the only way to meet this need. Choosing a Wi-Fi option means no concerns about range, the ability to see your baby when you are away from home, and usually better image quality. Wi-Fi also means you'll be able to use it for longer as potential security or nanny cam; this adds value you may not be considering right now (but should). Movement monitoring options are a luxury that most parents can do without. If you're worried about your little one and SIDs, studies show that having a baby sleep in their own bed in your room (along with standard safe sleep practices) goes a long way in helping to prevent SIDs and could potentially be more effective than movement monitoring. Choosing a great beside bassinet may be a better solution than a movement product. However, if your heart wants a movement product, then be sure to consider a sound or video option to pair with it so you can be sure to hear the alarm from another room.
If you opt for a Wi-Fi video baby monitor, you'll need a strong internet connection, because if your internet fails, so does your baby monitor. These baby monitors operate like your average smart home security camera from Nest, Canary, or others. You connect the camera to your Wi-Fi network, and then you can access live video anywhere on your computer, smartphone, or tablet. Many of these types of cameras offer encryption and other high-tech security features.

We tested monitors daily over a period of several months, in three houses: one nearly 100 years old with plaster walls, a newer home with standard drywall construction, and a two-level 1960s home with a driveway on another level from the kids’ rooms. We tried the Wi-Fi–enabled monitors with two routers, in separate test locations, to be sure that any connection issues were with the monitors themselves and not the Internet connection.


From each category, we hand-selected our finalists: the monitors with the most positive reviews on Amazon and parenting blogs, plus any that had all four of our parent-favorite features. Then we sent several monitors home with three different testers, to see which ones actually made parents’ lives easier, and which ones were more trouble than they’re worth.
The time you use your device depends on your needs and what type of device you choose. Movement products have the shortest lifespan and only work up to about 6-9 months old or when your little one starts rolling and moving. Sound and video options can be used for years depending on your needs. Video products can arguably be used for the longest period because it can help you keep tabs on older children as they nap and play. Wi-Fi options have the most extended use as they can also keep an eye on a nanny or work for security purposes. The Nest Cam is designed for security use and can be used for years to come in lots of applications. If the duration is a top concern for you, then the Wi-Fi video products, like the Nest cam or LeFun, should be your go-to choice.
We were also disappointed that the Angelcare’s parent unit lacks an out-of-range warning. If you’re in the backyard or basement and the monitor disconnects, it’s not clear whether you’re looking at a napping baby or a frozen screen. Still, it beat out the Baby Delight for sound and video quality and offers a few customizable features: You can adjust the volume on the baby unit as well as the parent unit, and set up timed alarms and temperature alerts.
If you hope to keep tabs on your little one while snoozing there are a few different options depending on what your goals are or what information you hope to have. The traditional baby monitoring device was designed to tell parents what was going on in the room as far as a baby crying or needing assistance. Since then, monitoring products have evolved into seeing the baby and even knowing if your baby is moving. Knowing which products do what can help you determine which type meets your goals and is right for your family.
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Check the return policy: Every family is different, so it can be hard to choose the perfect baby monitor for your needs. For that reason, we recommend you look into each product's return policy. Some companies are very good about letting you return baby monitors, but others are not. You may need to try a few different ones out before you find the winner. Obviously, we hope this guide assists you in making the right choice, but it's always good to have a backup plan. We've noted the return policy for each baby monitor we recommend in this guide.
Most dual monitors come with split- or even quad-screen viewing, and the DBPower Digital Sound Activated baby monitor does just that. This model supports up to four cameras, allowing you to monitor four rooms at once. With features like remote pan/tilt/zoom, room temperature monitoring and alert, two-way communication and manual or automatic video recording, we found the DBPower to be the best dual baby monitor.
A reliable video baby monitor is a must-have for new parents. These high-tech monitors allow you to keep tabs on your little one from a different room, giving you peace of mind as you go about your day and letting you know the minute your baby needs you. However, there are a lot of video baby monitors available today, and you may not know which one best suits your needs.
Whether you allow others one-time or occasional access to enjoy a special moment or you establish a schedule during which a regular caregiver can view and listen through the monitor, the process of controlling access is equally easy. Now, what if your baby or toddler just did something super cute when no one else had access? No worries, you can share video clips or stills right over the web.

One other difference between the Arlo and the Infant Optics is either a dealbreaker, or it’s insignificant, depending on how you plan to use your monitor. The Arlo cannot pan or tilt like the Infant Optics can, so once it’s fixed in a position, that’s your view. It has a wide enough field of vision to see a good portion of a 10-by-10 room, and it includes a wall-mounting plate for more versatile mounting options. (By the way, as you see in our photos, you can also remove those decorative rabbit ears and feet, if they’re obstructing a sight line, or if you just want it to look less like a toy and more like a camera.) If you’re in a smaller space where a fixed-point view might not be able to see the whole bed (or room), and especially if you’re planning on panning the camera to check on multiple kids sharing a room, you’ll almost definitely want the Infant Optics instead.
Why spend money on a baby monitor, which serves a single specific purpose, when you could use an indoor home-security camera that you can repurpose once your kid leaves the nursery? We wondered the same thing, so along with with dedicated video baby monitors, we tested a Nest Indoor Cam, currently among our top-rated wireless home security cameras.
Electromagnetic fields (EMF), or dirty electricity, is something we think needs to be discussed when talking about wireless baby monitors. Given that all wireless devices give off some level of EMF, we feel it would be negligent not to discuss the potential for possible health risks associated with the kind of radiation emitted by wireless products. While the jury is still out, and studies being done are not conclusive yet, there is enough evidence that EMF might potentially cause health problems that we feel it is better to be cautious when it comes to children's exposure than to ignore the possibilities.
The Arlo Baby camera, which comes dressed as an adorable green bunny, connects to your wireless internet and connects to your phone via the associated app. It streams 1080-pixel video footage, even at night, and has an 8x zoom to let you see exactly what’s going on in the nursery. There’s a two-way talk feature, night light and smart music player, as well as an air sensor and baby crying alert, letting you keep a watchful eye on your little one.
Monitors for babies should have good video images that are clear and true to life, but they should also have quality sound that is easy to hear and clear enough that parents can quickly decide if they need to look at the viewing screen, go back to sleep, or get running to the nursery. So while you might consider video quality to be the most important metric for this kind of product, we rated both video and sound equally because, without one, the other doesn't much matter. If the sound is muffled, difficult to decipher, or not loud enough, then parents might miss baby's cries. If sound activation or thresholds for background noise don't work as described, then parents might lose sleep listening to a loud monitor. However, once alerted, you need a clear view of baby with enough details to determine baby's needs, day or night, or the video style monitor isn't much better than a sound only monitor.
One detail that really sets the Arlo apart from the other Wi-Fi–enabled monitors we’ve tried sounds pretty simple but it’s actually a big deal if you’re using a monitor on a nightly basis: The Arlo can stream audio via your phone’s speaker while the app is in the background, unlike many other monitors we’ve seen that operate via smartphone, which work only while the app is in the foreground. This allows you to use the Arlo more easily while you sleep, which is how we’ve always used traditional monitors like the Infant Optics or VTech, our other picks. Just be sure you’re charging the phone overnight while doing this. Like the other video monitors we tested, our phones struggled to last a full night on battery alone when used in this way; running the monitor audio-only in the background (on an iPhone X in summer 2018 tests) often drained the phone battery by more than 70 percent between when we went to bed and when we got up seven hours later.
The Babysense 7 movement product is a sensor pad mattress product that isn't portable but seems to have fewer false alarms than wearable products. The BabySense 7 is easy to use and doesn't require much setup or preparation outside of placing the sensor and control unit. This unit even works well after your baby learns to roll over, unlike the wearable options that become less reliable as your little one's age.

Most monitors (including our pick) are designed for use at home, usually while the baby is less than a few hundred feet away, well within range of a local video stream that bypasses the Internet. But many people want to use the monitor remotely—either to see what’s happening at home while they’re at work, traveling, or out on a date. For those needs, a Wi-Fi–enabled monitor, like our also-great pick, is the way to go. A Wi-Fi–enabled model works fine at home, too, but it’s not quite as simple as one that skips the routine connection and login hassles, as well as the potential security concerns, of a Web-based video option.

The iBaby M6S Wi-Fi is the easiest Wi-Fi monitor to setup and use with a score of 9 of 10. The Nest Cam Indoor Wi-Fi camera is hot on its heels with an 8. Both options walk users through the setup process step-by-step and have intuitive menus that will seem familiar to even the most novice user who is familiar with a smartphone. Both options come with a quick start guide that will have you up and watching your baby in no time.
In addition to monitoring your kids, you can use the camera’s two-way talk to soothe your child (smart for when you sleep train), and it also comes with Intelligent Motion Alerts to let you know if something’s happening in the room. You can also choose to record video footage on an SD card (not included) if you want to use this product as a nanny cam.
Historically speaking, baby monitors and wireless video systems have been notorious for indiscriminately sharing radio frequencies with other gadgets, meaning neighbors might have been able to eavesdrop on the things going on inside your house. Modern-day video monitors are smart enough to find the best frequencies to avoid interference and encrypt the signal from camera to monitor for standalone units or camera to router to online for smartphone-based monitors. Almost every model supports the option to add a second camera if you’d like to monitor another room, too.
If you sleep in the same room as your baby or live in a small enough space that you can always hear or see what your baby is up to, you probably don’t need a monitor. Otherwise, most parents enjoy the convenience a baby monitor provides—instead of needing to stay close to the nursery or constantly checking on your child, you’re free to rest, catch up on Netflix or get things done around the house during naptime. Monitors can also double as a nanny cam to keep an eye on your child and their caretaker.
After testing more than half-a-dozen mounted cameras that beam live video from a nursery, the best baby monitor we've tested is Netgear's Arlo Baby. Netgear's baby monitor packs in a number of must-have features such as clear 1080p video, two-way audio and a host of sensors. Everything's easily accessible from a well-organized mobile app that puts the Arlo Baby's controls at your fingertips.
Adjustable Camera Pan/Tilt/Zoom: One of the most annoying things that can happen when you're using a baby monitor is closing the door and then turning on the video monitor only to realize that your camera isn't aimed at the baby at all, and you can't see a thing. Most of the baby monitor systems would require you to go back into your baby's room and manually adjust the camera. Some of the systems we review below have remotely adjustable camera angles, so you can pan side-to-side, tilt the camera angle upward/downward, and zoom in or out, without having to go back into your baby's room. Super convenient, and a critical feature to stay at the top of our best baby monitor list. It's also nice to have a relatively wide-view camera, like the Summer Infant wide baby monitor, so that even if you don't have wireless camera panning and tilting, the odds of still seeing your baby are pretty high if you have a wide-angle camera.
The Arlo’s security with your data is an issue more fully addressed in our guides to outdoor security cameras and indoor security cameras. But in reporting on the security of Wi-Fi–enabled baby monitors general, we’ve found that the overall likelihood of someone hacking into your baby monitor is remote, but it’s possible, Mark Stanislav, director of security engineering at Duo Security, told us in an interview. You’re relying on the security of your own home network and also the ability of the manufacturer to secure all of its devices, added Stanislav, who was also involved in Rapid7’s research into the vulnerabilities of Wi-Fi–enabled monitors.
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