If you’re looking to take your baby monitor to the next level, choose a WiFi monitor. Our top pick is the iBaby M6T. You can watch your baby from literally anywhere through its Apple or Android app. There are lots of customization options too, like receiving push notifications when your baby wakes up or instructions on how to improve the room’s air quality.
The best baby monitor apps allow you to monitor baby using only your existing devices, like phones, tablets or even computers. One device acts a transmitter in baby’s room, and you use another device to monitor baby. Some apps only have audio functionality, but others have both audio and video. As a plus, the best baby monitor apps often have cool features that traditional baby monitors don’t have, like remote capabilities. However, some users complain that they can be somewhat unreliable.
The DM111 is a basic bare-bones sound option that does exactly what a sound product should do. It relays the sounds from your baby's room to the parent device with no muss no fuss and good sound quality. With a simple plug and play design, it is hard to mess up making it a great choice for parents who aren't technology savvy or for grandma who might find more complicated products frustrating. This product is the cheapest option in any of our reviews for monitoring products, but you won't be sacrificing sound quality or usefulness for the price.
The Philips Avent SCD630 earned a 4th place rank, but it is the number 1 ranked dedicated monitor we tested. It has the longest range and highest ease of use scores for the dedicated options and the best score for sound clarity out of all the monitors we tested in this review. The Philips has lullabies, a nightlight, 2-way talk to baby, automatic screen wakeup/sleep, sound activation, 2x zoom, and a temperature sensor. While it struggles to offer true to life images and has fewer features than most of the competition, it is hard to deny that this plug and play monitor is a simple solution for video baby monitoring, and it gets the job done with little fuss and only a small learning curve. However, if you want a remote-controlled camera, you should look elsewhere, as this one is manual with a smaller field of view.
This is the second most expensive baby monitor on our list (coming in just under $250), and there is a lot to love about it. First, it has the Samsung reliability and quality control, making it a long-lasting baby monitor that isn't likely to drop signals in the middle of the night. Second, it has a large 5" display with high definition 720p resolution. Third, it has the two-way intercom that allows you to not only hear but also to speak to your baby. Fourth, it has automatic voice activation so if your baby fusses or says something, the screen will turn on and alert you that something's up. It also has a pan-tilt-zoom camera, selectable music/lullabies and a night light on the camera (you can turn on/off remotely), and is expandable up to 4 cameras with just the one display. With all these awesome features, why is it second on our list? In our side-by-side comparison of the Infant Optics and this Samsung, we found the Infant Optics to come out ahead in several regards. First, let's talk about a few advantages of the Samsung: it has a larger screen than the Infant Optics, selectable music, the nightlight, and is expandable up to 4 cameras that you can view simultaneously on the single screen (you can buy the extra baby cameras here). That's a lot of great features. However, when we compare it to something like the Infant Optics that has the same price, there are several disadvantages relative to the Infant Optics and other baby monitors on this list. First, even though Samsung SEW3043W Brightview HD monitor touts a robust 900-ft range, we noticed that when we went outside the signal dropped repeatedly in our back or front yards; it was quite good, however, when going up to the third floor or basement while still inside the house. So there are some definite limitations on the range and signal connectivity. Second, the Infant Optics has the baby room temperature monitor, which we found useful during a few summer nights when we didn't realize how warm it was getting in the baby's room. Third, even though the Infant Optics screen is smaller, we found it to be a bit faster and more responsive as a touch screen, and a bit brighter as a monitor. The two night vision capabilities were about the same. With all these limitations, we're surprised that the Samsung is quite a bit more expensive than the Infant Optics.

This really is the monitor that does it all! What puts this monitor heads and shoulders above the rest is the activity sensor pad that goes under baby’s mattress and monitors for lack of movement—a helpful enhancement for tracking baby’s breathing during those scary SIDS months. Once baby grows past that stage, breathe a sigh of relief, but don’t throw the monitor out with the bathwater, because the Angelcare AC517 also comes with both an audio and a video monitor! What more could you ask for?

To test each camera’s night vision, we used them in darkened bedrooms with blackout curtains, with and without nightlights. For a more extreme test, we set the cameras up in a windowless room in a basement with a towel blocking light from the door. We aimed all the cameras at a doll’s face approximately 6 feet across the room, looked at the monitors, and tried not to creep ourselves out.
Ease of use may not seem like a big deal because once you know how to use something, it won't seem that hard, and after you use it for a while it can feel intuitive even if it isn't. However, with this type of product, there can be a learning curve depending on what kind you choose and how many features it has. While the dedicated monitors were plug in and go options that even grandma can manage, some of them took a little more skill to navigate and learn. The Wi-Fi options, on the other hand, do require some knowledge of technology and the way apps work. With all of them, you will need to set up the camera with your computer or another device, and you will need to set up an account and be able to manage things like Wi-Fi passwords and various settings inside the application. While this may seem like no big deal to some parents, it could be challenging for those that are less tech-savvy.

Video monitors give a quick and silent look into baby's world without leaving your cozy bed or disturbing the baby. If a trip to the nursery is warranted, you haven't lost much time, but if the baby is just adjusting, then you can go back to sleep without getting up. Getting good sleep, or as much sleep as possible can be the difference between a great newborn experience and feeling like a new parent/zombie failure.
Another big plus? Its "basic but secure" radio frequency (RF) connection, Wirecutter says. Unlike monitors that transmit via Wi-Fi (and can be hacked from virtually anywhere on Earth), the DXR-8 is pretty hack-proof. It uses a 2.4 GHz FHSS (Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum) signal. Long story short, a hacker would pretty much have to be in the apartment next door, using just the right listening equipment to eavesdrop on your baby, tech journalist Carl Franzen explains at Lifehacker. He goes on a personal quest to find a hack-proof baby monitor before the birth of his first child – and settles on the DXR-8.
One of the biggest concerns with a baby monitor is going out of range and not hearing baby crying for you. Talk about a case of mom guilt! When shopping for the best long-range baby monitor, note that the range listed on the box doesn’t account for walls or doors; it’s a line-of-sight range. So, although you may not actually be able to travel 1,000 feet away from baby, you should be able to head to the basement to do laundry or be outside in the yard without worrying about missing baby’s cries.
If that's all this multi-function device did, then it would still be worth its price tag. But REMI does more yet. As your child gets older and can begin to manage his or her own sleep schedule, REMI helps the kid out by serving as a sleep trainer. You can program the time that your child is allowed to wake by having REMI wake up at the appointed hour. And to calm and soothe a child, you can use this Bluetooth enabled device as a speaker, playing music or talking to your child via REMI app connection.
"For 2 or more children this is fantastic! You can pair multiple cameras and set the monitor to scan back and forth viewing multiple rooms. The lens change feature is also nice (a zoom lens...included) allows you to get a close view of the crib/swing/etc even if the camera has to sit far away. The (wide angle lens.... optional purchase) allows you to view most of the bedroom. This is great for older kids rooms so you can see if they get out of bed and what they are doing… Long-lasting battery provides reliable charge: 10 hours in power-saving mode, 6 hours with the display screen constantly on."
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Britta O’Boyle at Pocket-Lint says: “The Withings Home is a lot more than just a smart camera – it’s the complete home solution it claims to be.” Megan Wollerton at CNET loves all of the extra features that the Home offers, although she doesn’t like its lack of a web-based interface and other features that make it less optimal as a security camera.
Look for a monitoring system that is a good fit for your home and lifestyle. For example, if you’re in a small apartment in a busy city, having a monitor that has a long range won’t be as important to you, but one that screens out background noise will. For parents that frequently travel or work long days, being able to check on your child from anywhere and talk over the audio can help keep you connected. But, for those who are with their kids most of the time this might not matter much. The point is, consider what will make parenting easier and your family happiest and you can’t go wrong.
The Motorola MPB36S is the workhorse of the baby monitor world. Moms that own this monitor seem to keep it around for years and use it for their second — and sometimes even third — babies. If you’re not too tech savvy or get overwhelmed with instruction manuals, then this option may be for you. It’s easy to set up, which makes it a favorite for parents who love to travel with their little ones in tow. You can even add another camera without too much hassle or expense.
Looking for a baby monitor? Your search can stop here. Stop spending money on baby monitors. With this free app, you can turn your phones into video monitors with live chat, motion detection, and night vision features. Caregiving is hard, especially when you are caring for a baby, a toddler, an elder or someone with dementia. Take out your old phone and download the Caregiver Video Monitor app and you'll have all the features
Historically speaking, baby monitors and wireless video systems have been notorious for indiscriminately sharing radio frequencies with other gadgets, meaning neighbors might have been able to eavesdrop on the things going on inside your house. Modern-day video monitors are smart enough to find the best frequencies to avoid interference and encrypt the signal from camera to monitor for standalone units or camera to router to online for smartphone-based monitors. Almost every model supports the option to add a second camera if you’d like to monitor another room, too.
For parents who want to monitor their baby’s cries from the office, or the gym, or Tahiti, the BB-8-looking iBaby M6S syncs right up to your house Wi-Fi connection ⏤ so instead of using a dedicated handheld receiver, you watch all the action on a smartphone app. It offers impressive 1080p HD video (with record function), a 360-degree view with 110-degree tilt, and an array of high-tech sensors including motion, sound, in-room temperature, air quality, and humidity. The only thing it seemingly won’t do is fix your X-Wing fighter. Although it makes up for it with night vision, two-way talk, and 10 programmed lullabies and bedtime stories, to which you can even add your own voice.
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This option doesn't have sound activation, so there is has some noise all the time similar to white noise. This sound may not be a deal breaker if it comes from a fan or noise maker in baby's room and some parents may even find the sound helpful for sleeping or reassuring them that the unit is working. The DM111 is an excellent choice for families on a budget who want to hear the baby and don't need all the frills commonly found in more expensive choices.
The more old fashioned video monitors are better if your internet isn't reliable because they use a dedicated video monitor instead. You can also choose to pair high-tech Wi-Fi security cameras with cheaper audio-only baby monitors to have the best of both worlds. We've tested a few baby monitors and researched the rest to find the best ones you can buy no matter your preference.
Once you've settled on a type and have considered your range, you can look at the potential choice and which features they have. The more budget-friendly choices usually lack bells and whistles but are still functional. If you want more features like nightlights, lullabies, and talk to the baby, then you may pay more and the unit could be more difficult to use. The one feature we think is important is sound activation to help keep your device quiet when your baby is quiet, thereby increasing your chances of a full night's sleep.
Larger homes or locations with more than 4 or 5 walls between the camera and parent unit might be stuck with a Wi-Fi monitor. Most of the dedicated monitors only worked up to 4 walls, with the exception of the Project Nursery 4.3 that stopped working at 3. The Philips Avent SCD630 has the longest range for dedicated monitors in this review, with an impressive 92 ft through 5 walls, so if your needs are greater than that, then none of the dedicated monitors we tested are likely to work for your situation. Wi-Fi connected cameras, on the other hand, are limited only by the wireless router location in relation to the camera and parent unit, and the strength and speed of your Wi-Fi connection. If necessary, routers can often be moved, or range extenders added, to increase the range between the components if the Wi-Fi monitor struggles to keep a clear or consistent connection. Purchasing a monitor from a venue with a simple return policy like Amazon means you'll be able to test the monitor in your house to determine how well it works without the risk of being stuck with a useless product.
For the parent devices of dedicated monitors, the battery life ranged anywhere between 6.75 and 12.75 hours. The Wi-Fi options are harder to gauge given that the battery life depends on the kind of device used, whether or not it is being used for other applications simultaneously, and how old the battery is in the device. In general, however, we feel it is relatively safe to say that most will work longer than the best dedicated monitor battery if the device is dedicated for use with the monitor only and is not running other applications simultaneously.
The superior wireless range of the MBP36S lets you keep connected to your baby up to 590 feet away. So even if you have a larger home, you don't have to give up safety or the ability to stay connected to your little one. An alarm sounds when you're getting out of range of the transmitting unit, so you'll never have to wonder if you're close enough to hear what's going on. A low battery alert also sounds when it's time to recharge the battery.

Many of the baby monitors we've tested are internet-connected, letting you watch infant with your phone or tablet through an app just as if you were checking a home security camera. Because of this, you might not actually get a standalone display to go along with the camera. They aren't out of the question, however; some camera-only baby monitors offer viewers as an add-on or in a bundle. And if there aren't any available, you can simply get an inexpensive tablet like the Amazon Fire to use as a dedicated viewer.
Ease of use may not seem like a big deal because once you know how to use something, it won't seem that hard, and after you use it for a while it can feel intuitive even if it isn't. However, with this type of product, there can be a learning curve depending on what kind you choose and how many features it has. While the dedicated monitors were plug in and go options that even grandma can manage, some of them took a little more skill to navigate and learn. The Wi-Fi options, on the other hand, do require some knowledge of technology and the way apps work. With all of them, you will need to set up the camera with your computer or another device, and you will need to set up an account and be able to manage things like Wi-Fi passwords and various settings inside the application. While this may seem like no big deal to some parents, it could be challenging for those that are less tech-savvy.
Aside from the thousands of Amazon reviews, Reviewed.com likes it, noting that it “has physical buttons on the parent unit that are more responsive than Samsung’s [SEW3043 BrightView HD, our former runner-up] touchscreen controls.” PCMag’s Rob Pegoraro gave the DXR-8 a “Good” rating, and in his review, cites the battery life as being one of the best features. “What is remarkable is how long the display unit’s 1,200mAh battery ran on a charge,” Pegoraro says. “Infant Optics touts 10 hours of runtime with the screen off, but even with periodic peeks I didn’t get a low-battery warning until 12 hours later.”
You start running into problems when you download the third-party app that allows for monitoring via your mobile phone. In theory, this should add all sorts of features, like push notifications, motion and audio sensing, and video recording for later viewing. And Motorola would be one of the only companies offering both a base station and app. The problem is, the app's connection is so intermittent, I could barely even try out those features, let alone use them with any sort of consistency.
To test each camera’s night vision, we used them in darkened bedrooms with blackout curtains, with and without nightlights. For a more extreme test, we set the cameras up in a windowless room in a basement with a towel blocking light from the door. We aimed all the cameras at a doll’s face approximately 6 feet across the room, looked at the monitors, and tried not to creep ourselves out.
Seems reasonable to me. If you fly in restricted space - which an airport is - they should be able to do as they please, including shooting it down. Hell, if I catch a drone flying on my property, I should be able to do the same. For all intents and purposes, that drone is an extension of a person - it can look, listen, pick things up, put things down - all the things you would not want an intruder doing on your property. An unauthorized person on my property is trespassing... so a drone on my land should be treated the same way. The bottom line is that the drone should be simply treated as a surrogate for the human controlling it.

We tested monitors daily over a period of several months, in three houses: one nearly 100 years old with plaster walls, plus a newer home with standard drywall construction, and a two-level 1960s home with a driveway on another level from the kids’ rooms. We tried the cloud-based monitors with two routers to be sure that any connection issues were with the monitors themselves and not the Internet connection.
For standalone monitors, we found that two features were nice to have: The first is VOX, which mutes the ambient sounds in a room entirely, activating the speaker (and often the video) only when significant sound is recognized. The second feature we appreciated was LED sound meters. These are an excellent, rare feature to keep constant tabs on a baby while muting a monitor and turning the video off (Consumer Reports appreciates these LEDs, too.)
Type: After considering the options, weighing the relative advantages, and experiencing many firsthand, we determined our ideal monitor would be an RF (radio frequency) video monitor rather than one of the two main alternatives: a Wi-Fi (or cloud-based) model that you can check on your phone, and bare-bones audio-only speakers. (We approached our research with an open mind and gave an equal chance to all three types.) Since the best audio monitors cost far less, we have recommendations for both video and audio types—and we answered the question, What about a Wi-Fi baby monitor? with a firm conclusion that RF video can better provide what most people want: a clear view of a baby, a secure connection, and a dedicated monitor that can operate in the background without tying up your phone.

"WORRY FREE! as long as my baby has on her sock to sleep, I know what her heart rate and oxygen levels are. If the sock doesn't pick up the reading due to poor fit I'm notified, if we aren't close enough to the base station, I'm notified. Any time her levels drop below or rise above what's normal, I'm alerted. I love being able to check on her stats via the app without having to wonder or reach in and feel just to end up waking her."
We also liked the iBaby because while it allowed us to invite other users to see through the camera — great if you want to give your babysitter access while you’re out — only the person who registered the iBaby monitor has administrator access to all of the features. The administrator can give some privileges to other users, like being able to move the camera around, but they can take them away just as quickly.
Environmental sensors: Many monitors include the ability to set thresholds and upper limits for room temperature and/or humidity, and they'll alert you when these ranges are exceeded. While they can't control the temperature or the amount of moisture in the room's air, this feature can help you improve your child’s comfort, which will help them get more restful sleep.
The LeFun C2 720P Wi-Fi earned a 3rd place rank thanks to high scores for range and battery life, and impressive results for video quality and features. This monitor earned a Best Value for Wi-Fi monitors for its budget-friendly list price that is the least expensive in the group and its higher rank. This means you can get a great, top performing monitor, at a reasonable price. The LeFun has motion detection, sound activation, 2-way talk to baby, zoom, and a remote-controlled camera with real pan and tilt capabilities. The downside to this camera is a lag time when using the pan and tilt feature, and it is a little harder to use than the other Wi-Fi options we tested, but given the low price, we suspect most parents will forgive these flaws.

At the end of the day, if all you want is a no muss no fuss monitor that most parents will be able to set up and use quickly, then either Wi-Fi option will work. However, if you just want to plug it in and have it work without the need to learn something new, then the award-winning Philips Avent SCD630 or the Best Value, Levana Lila, will get the job done simply and fast. The cheaper price tag and simplicity of fewer buttons (easier to use) on the Levana Lila make it a great option as a secondary monitor for Grandma or travel.
The Nanit couldn’t be more perfect for analytical types. The camera—when placed just so—uses computer vision to watch your baby’s every move, and then tell you what it means. You get a notice on your phone, which acts like a handheld monitor, when your child is awake, acting fussy or has fallen asleep. The Nanit also assigns a sleep score to each night based on how many hours your child was actually crashed out. Other stats include how many times you went into your child’s room and how long it took for your little one to fall asleep. Because the Nanit streams live video and audio to your phone, you can also check in on your kiddo when you’re away from home. It also has a nightlight and temperature and humidity sensors.
The price of the Infant Optics, at about $150, is on the higher end for baby monitors. As much as we wanted to recommend a more affordable option, we found their shortcomings to be major enough—terrible video quality and poor connections were common—that we couldn’t recommend one. The Infant Optics offers a better value even though it’s among the more expensive options out there. Many people use these daily for years, which helps justify the investment, and the reports of reliable customer service from other customers are reassuring. If you have to spend less, go audio-only.
Most smartphone-based cameras give you the option to watch video and audio live or receive notification alerts when the camera notices a distinct change in noise levels or motion. This is an effective way to allow you to keep tabs on the little one with the constant tax to your nerves. After you receive the notification, you load the app to listen in on exactly what your camera heard. This takes just moments. In our testing, small noises, like a cough or grunt, didn’t generally set off the noise sensor, while cries did. But false positives can and do happen.
With a 1,000-foot range and DECT technology, the VTech Safe & Sound Digital Audio relays sound with excellent clarity. Two-way communication offers a way to calm a baby when he or she is waking up or trying to fall asleep. It also includes a night light for late-night feedings. The digital display indicates signal strength and power/battery life. This monitor offers a full range of alarms when your baby wakes — audio, indicator lights, and vibration.
Being a new parent is an exciting and occasionally stressful journey into uncharted territory. There are so many things to learn about your baby and all the different products you need to keep your little one happy and healthy. One of the most important and expensive purchases you'll make when you're outfitting your nursery is buying a baby monitor.

If you aren't interested in having a video baby monitor, the VTech DM221 is the very best audio-only monitor you can buy. You can listen in on your baby or get vibration and light-based alerts when the monitor is in silent mode. The five LED lights indicate the level of sound so you can tell whether your baby is cooing quietly or shrieking for mom and dad.
We swapped in and out more than a dozen different video cameras in front of a Graco Pack ‘N Play, and we monitored a 3-month-old baby for weeks, filming through the mesh, spying during daytime naps, and watching in the pitch black of night. When applicable, we’d take the base units out of the test apartment, down flights of stairs, to check their range.
All of the products in our review have features for convenience and overall function, but some also offer features for fun or additional information. All of the products have night vision with sensors for automatic adjustment with light changes, and all offer 2-way communication with baby through the camera. Some of them come with lullabies, and others have nifty temperature and humidity sensors. Overall, whatever you might be looking for, or never knew existed but now want, can probably be found in the products we tested.
Security is one reason Stanislav personally uses an RF monitor (like our pick) with his own daughter. He added that even that is not completely secure—“there are absolutely ways to break into a signal with radio frequency,” he said. But, noting that you have to be physically close to the house, and have the motive and ability to do it, he says it’s “a very small risk to your average parent.” In addition to the actual risks of a Wi-Fi monitor, there’s a perception that they’re vulnerable—this suspicious tone comes up often in many conversations with parents about monitors, with statements like “we’ve all heard the horror stories”2 coloring the whole discussion and suggesting, to us, that most people are really put off by the vulnerability.
In our tests, Levana Ayden did well in the categories where Levana Keera underperformed, particularly with regards to user-friendliness. This was most noticeable in the simple controls, which are easy to learn. Levana Ayden also has a few useful extras such as a built-in nightlight and three lullabies to help sooth your baby as they sleep. This unit costs around $90, which is quite competitive with other video baby monitors. Unfortunately, the unit lacks the ability to remotely reposition the camera and has lower than average video quality, which can make details hard to see. The audio had mild interference, but this didn't affect the overall quality much. The one-year warranty is typical of video baby monitors.
Larger homes or locations with more than 4 or 5 walls between the camera and parent unit might be stuck with a Wi-Fi monitor. Most of the dedicated monitors only worked up to 4 walls, with the exception of the Project Nursery 4.3 that stopped working at 3. The Philips Avent SCD630 has the longest range for dedicated monitors in this review, with an impressive 92 ft through 5 walls, so if your needs are greater than that, then none of the dedicated monitors we tested are likely to work for your situation. Wi-Fi connected cameras, on the other hand, are limited only by the wireless router location in relation to the camera and parent unit, and the strength and speed of your Wi-Fi connection. If necessary, routers can often be moved, or range extenders added, to increase the range between the components if the Wi-Fi monitor struggles to keep a clear or consistent connection. Purchasing a monitor from a venue with a simple return policy like Amazon means you'll be able to test the monitor in your house to determine how well it works without the risk of being stuck with a useless product.
Here is a great bang-for-the-buck best baby monitor that has some great features. It is sold under two different brand names, one is Babysense, and the other is Smilism. We purchased both, and they were basically exactly the same other than the different logos. We're assuming they are the same company selling under two different brand names, but we can't be sure. Let's begin with the "bang" part of bang-for-the-buck. This baby monitor has a lot of good features, including two-way intercom, room temperature monitoring, "eco" mode that keeps the screen off until it hears your baby make a sound, remote zoom, and a few music (lullaby) options. It is also expandable up to 4 cameras, using the same base unit. From the base unit, you can cycle through which camera you want to view at any given time; you cannot view them all simultaneously on the same base unit (like picture-in-picture). We really liked the eco mode, and also liked that on the top of the unit there is a little flashing light to reassure you that it's on during eco mode, even though the screen is off. So there are a lot of great features here, especially for the low price of only about $75! That's right, only about $75, and each add-on camera is about $40. So there's a great deal for a nicely featured camera. What are the missing features? Well, the remote tilt and pan function was not included, so you have to position the camera the right way in your baby's room or you're out of luck in the middle of the night. Second, in our testing it took a bit too much time to cycle between each of the baby cameras: the screen would turn white and you need to wait several seconds for the other camera to show on the screen. This same white screen happens during start-up of the unit. We also weren't totally impressed by the range of the base unit on this Babysense video baby monitor. It works great if you're 1-2 rooms away, but if you go upstairs or several rooms away, the signal drops intermittently. Even with those little downfalls, this is a great budget pick for a well-featured baby video monitor with some good reliability, enough to put it up at this spot on our best-of list. Note that Babysense also makes a great new under-mattress movement monitor as well. We've been using it for 10 months now and it's still going strong with no issues. Interested? You can check out the Babysense Baby Monitor here. 
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