Encrypted Wireless Communications: Here's something creepy and strange - there are reports of people tapping into even the best baby monitors and getting some bizarre pleasure from watching your baby sleep or watching you feed the baby in the middle of the night. A few of the manufacturers have included wireless encryption on their systems to make this much less likely.
They sent me a replacement unit quickly (I have the 2.8, it sounds like sometimes there is stock status issues with the 3.5?), and sent the replacement unit prior to me sending back the defective unit. However, they said the warranty on the replacement unit is only 90 days, vs 1 year for the original purchase. BEFORE there were power issues, I would rate this monitor 5 stars. So I'm just praying that the new units they ship out, knowing there is such an issue with the power port, has fixed the issue vs just sending out more of the same units with an obvious defect. Time will tell... I will update accordingly...
At over $200, are advanced audio/video monitoring systems with multiple cameras and receivers with large screens, as well as the ability to connect to several mobile devices. While they are loaded with features, it’s important to look closely at the audio and video quality. Expensive monitors are just as susceptible to interference as inexpensive ones.

"WORRY FREE! as long as my baby has on her sock to sleep, I know what her heart rate and oxygen levels are. If the sock doesn't pick up the reading due to poor fit I'm notified, if we aren't close enough to the base station, I'm notified. Any time her levels drop below or rise above what's normal, I'm alerted. I love being able to check on her stats via the app without having to wonder or reach in and feel just to end up waking her."


With a 1,000-foot range and DECT technology, the VTech Safe & Sound Digital Audio relays sound with excellent clarity. Two-way communication offers a way to calm a baby when he or she is waking up or trying to fall asleep. It also includes a night light for late-night feedings. The digital display indicates signal strength and power/battery life. This monitor offers a full range of alarms when your baby wakes — audio, indicator lights, and vibration.


Sound devices relay what is happening in baby's room via sound only. A great sound option is quiet unless the baby is making noise so that you won't be disturbed by white noise or constant static. This basic monitoring type can be all you need if your goal is being alerted when your baby is crying and needs your assistance. This style can be elementary with sound only like the V-Tech DM111 or it can have bells and whistles like a nightlight, 2-way talk, lullabies, and mic sensitivity adjustment features like the Philips Avent DECT SCD570/10. Most parents can get by with a sound only device as it provides the information you need to determine if your baby needs you or not.

How far away baby's monitor can be from the parent unit is what determines a product's range. While many manufacturers offer a "line of sight" range to describe a monitor's range, it is not a good indication of how well it will work in your home with walls and interference. It doesn't matter how much you like a specific model or brand, if it doesn't work in your house, it simply isn't going to work. We tested both indoor range and open field tests to provide the best information, but remember that the values inside your home matter more than those in an open field, unless of course, you are leaving a baby alone in an open field (which we don't recommend).
From each category, we hand-selected our finalists: the monitors with the most positive reviews on Amazon and parenting blogs, plus any that had all four of our parent-favorite features. Then we sent several monitors home with three different testers, to see which ones actually made parents’ lives easier, and which ones were more trouble than they’re worth.
Electromagnetic fields (EMF), or dirty electricity, is something we think needs to be discussed when talking about wireless baby monitors. Given that all wireless devices give off some level of EMF, we feel it would be negligent not to discuss the potential for possible health risks associated with the kind of radiation emitted by wireless products. While the jury is still out, and studies being done are not conclusive yet, there is enough evidence that EMF might potentially cause health problems that we feel it is better to be cautious when it comes to children's exposure than to ignore the possibilities.
Electromagnetic fields (EMF), or dirty electricity, is something we think needs to be discussed when talking about wireless baby monitors. Given that all wireless devices give off some level of EMF, we feel it would be negligent not to discuss the potential for possible health risks associated with the kind of radiation emitted by wireless products. While the jury is still out, and studies being done are not conclusive yet, there is enough evidence that EMF might potentially cause health problems that we feel it is better to be cautious when it comes to children's exposure than to ignore the possibilities.
What about the regular Motorola video monitors? In a previous edition, we recommended these monitors as the feedback was mostly positive. However, in the past year, parent feedback on Motorola’s basic video monitors has turned largely negative, with numerous reports of monitors that simply stopped working after a few months. Sometimes the sound just quits. Or the video konks out. Or the battery won’t charge after a few months of use.

This is an excellent baby monitor that uses many of the same principles as the Nanit, Nest Cam, and Cocoon Cam. It uses a cute and innovative video camera on a flexible stick that can hook around the top of the crib, bend into an upright stand, or mount onto the wall with an included mount. This versatility is great for the different stages of development, and it can be flexibly used as a security camera or baby monitor. For new babies that aren't old enough to stand up and grab the camera, it can be mounted right on the crib's upper rail, giving you the perfect view onto your sleeping baby. Then for child safety, it can be moved to the wall or on top of a nearby dresser, to stay out of baby's curious hands and give you a good vantage point into the crib. The camera hooks into your existing home wifi, and you use your smart phone to connect (there's a cell phone app for the iPhone or Android). If the camera and your phone are both connected to your home wifi, you will get real-time streaming within your home, and you can turn on privacy mode to keep the signal from traveling to the cloud for processing (i.e., it will stay in your local area network, the signal never leaves your home). This makes the stream much faster, but also makes sure that it will still work during an internet outage. When you leave your house and connect to your cellular carrier or to a different wifi, the camera's signal will travel through Amazon's cloud computing service then get bounced down to your phone's app. The cloud computing does two things. One is that it makes it possible for you to remotely connect to see your live camera wherever you are, as long as you have your phone. Second, it will analyze the sound to check for crying and send you an alert when any fussing is detected. And it seems pretty specific to crying, rather than sending alerts whenever there is a little other noise (like a door closing). It also saves little 30-second video clips from when the crying was detected, so you can go back (like with a DV-R) and see what was going on. Nice touch! And that cloud service is completely free to you, paid for by Lollipop. The digital video is streamed in high definition (720p), and we found that it has generally good video and digital audio sound quality. Even the night vision is really pretty great. One of the features we really liked, and we didn't find on any other wifi baby monitor, was the ability to stream just the audio overnight (audio mode for night nursery). So your smart phone screen can be off, and you can just use it as a basic audio-only monitor; that's a nice feature to save your phone's battery life and keep the bright screen from turning on in the middle of the night. In our testing, this worked really nicely, but it's worth noting that it only works in this mode when you are on the same wifi connection as the baby camera (i.e., you're at home). We found the video quality to be very high, though the "real-time streaming" did sometimes get a little delayed by a few seconds, especially when streaming through the cloud to our iPhone on a 4G connection. A few cool things worth mentioning. Mounting was easy, no more drilling into the crib or using adhesives. You can buy a separate sensor for about $55 that will tell you some additional information about your baby's room, like room temperature sensors, and air quality and humidity sensors; it connects to the camera via Bluetooth. You can also play sounds for your baby through the app, like white noise, trickling water, or even the sound of the vacuum. You can also setup multiple cameras to view on the same app (not at the same time though). So there are tons of great features here, and overall we thought it worked really well in our testing. Drawbacks? Well, it is a little pricey coming in around $150, just like the Cocoon Cam. It also can get pretty laggy when streaming through cellular networks, but that's not really Lollipop's fault. Note that the one currently available on Amazon as of July appears to be a knock-off Lollipop camera, in the meantime, you might need to purchase one directly through the Lollipop website. This camera deserves a much higher spot on our list, but we're worried about where you can actually get a genuine version of the monitor - we're in touch with the company and will update when we hear some news. So overall, this is a great new baby monitor with wifi that you will very likely be pleased with. We'll update this article in 6-months to talk about long-term reliability. Interested? You can check out the Lollipop Baby Monitor here.

Its parent display unit is the smallest we tested, with a screen only 2.4 inches wide, but the video quality was among the best. By comparison, Infant Optics’ bigger screen didn’t offer a better picture, and our Motorola model had an obvious two-second delay — even when we took it off WiFi and used its direct signal mode to rule out connectivity issues. The differences are slight, but we were impressed that the HelloBaby could keep up with monitors twice its price.
Historically speaking, baby monitors and wireless video systems have been notorious for indiscriminately sharing radio frequencies with other gadgets, meaning neighbors might have been able to eavesdrop on the things going on inside your house. Modern-day video monitors are smart enough to find the best frequencies to avoid interference and encrypt the signal from camera to monitor for standalone units or camera to router to online for smartphone-based monitors. Almost every model supports the option to add a second camera if you’d like to monitor another room, too.
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Frequency: Some baby monitors operate on the same 2.4GHz frequency band as household products like microwaves, cordless phones, wireless speakers, and so on. When the monitor is on the same frequency as a number of other products, you can experience interference and static. You may want to get a monitor that uses a different frequency like 1.9GHz, which the Federal Communications Commission sets aside for audio-only applications. It's called DECT, or Digitally Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications.
Like many monitors in this price range, the SafeVIEW provides a lot of bells and whistles: remote zoom, tilt and pan of the camera, two-way communication and a range of 900 feet so you don’t have to stress about chatting with your neighbor outside during naptime. The SafeVIEW also has a built-in nightlight that you can turn on and off using the monitor. And, if the monitor is going nuts every time a big truck drives by or during a thunderstorm, you can decrease its sound sensitivity to not pick up the background noise.
To save on battery life, some audio/video models only turn on when the baby makes an unusual motion or sound. Some models come with a motion-detector pad that fits under the crib sheet. This type of motion sensor is intended to prevent SIDS. Sensitive enough to detect changes in breathing, an alarm sounds if there is no movement after 20 minutes. However, if the baby simply rolls off the pad, the alarm may sound.
Bottom Line Fun Wi-Fi option with lots of features that is easy to use and has true to life images we love Really cool camera with lots of uses and great video for simple baby monitoring Budget friendly Wi-Fi camera with nice images, but potential delay of varying length Our favorite dedicated monitor with impressive range that is very easy to use A budget friendly dedicated monitor that gets the job done well without all the fluff
To test connectivity, we put the handheld unit and the camera in neighboring rooms with 30 feet between them. We looked for lag, choppiness, and changes in the video or sound quality. While we rated it separately, we also did tests to estimate each baby cam’s maximum indoor range. Each camera we tested has a range of 100 feet or more, which is enough for an average-size home.
If initial impressions mean anything, this is definitely one of the biggest bang-for-the-buck baby monitors on the market. It has some fantastic features, and is offered at a great price point at around $70! Here are some of the best features: first, it has very clear daytime video and crystal clear sound. Using 2.4Ghz communications, like most others on this list, it does a great job connecting, staying connected, and providing superb sound quality. It also is expandable with additional cameras - up to 4 additional cameras to be exact, which means you can really get one of these everywhere. Need one in the playroom, nursery, by the bassinet? Having up to 4 cameras connected is awesome, and the base station provides the easy ability to switch which camera you're looking at. Of course, it only comes with one out of the box, but you can buy extra cameras for about $40 each. We also liked that there is no complicated setup like with some of the IP cameras on this list, which means that there is no connecting to your internet router, or trying to get a phone app to connect. Of course, that also means you can only watch from the base station, not on your phone. About that base station. You can control whether you want digital video and sound, or sound only, and you can also remotely zoom in on your baby as needed (only 2 zoom levels though), but you cannot remotely pan or tilt the camera. There is a 2-way intercom (twoway talk) so you can talk to baby, or play one of the included lullabies. With the screen on, we were able to get the base station's battery to last for about 7 hours, and with just sound the battery lasted for about 11 hours. So definitely long enough for nap times during the day! Like many of the other ones on this list, you can put it into standby mode and have it voice activate automatically when the camera's microphone hears something in the room (like a fussy baby). We thought this feature worked really well and wasn't overly-sensitive and false alarming all night, which could get really annoying. So there are a lot of things to love about this baby video monitor. With such a low price, the feature list is obviously limited. We also thought the nighttime video quality really left something to be desired. We kept trying to increase the brightness to help, but it still was pretty poor relative to other units on this list. Finally, when we first reviewed this system we purchased 3 of them. After 1.5 years, only 1 of them is still working perfectly, 1 of them is a bit glitchy from time to time, and the other one had a screen failure. So we see some reliability and consistency issues with these baby video monitors, and that's the primary reason that it's not higher up on our list. In any event, we do recommend this camera, especially given the overall bang for the buck. But given how cheap it is, don't expect any miracles, or to be buying something to last you until you have grandchildren!
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