I did recently downloaded Baby Monitor by Annie from Apple store and it works great! Don't really need to buy the expensive monitoring devices as with two children, I don't have much money to waste really. Of course it's for the safety of the children, so it's not really a waste, although I can easily use this app and it does everything what the big baby monitors do and even more. I've just used my old ipad as the second device placed near my LO.
This is an excellent baby monitor that uses many of the same principles as the Nanit, Nest Cam, and Cocoon Cam. It uses a cute and innovative video camera on a flexible stick that can hook around the top of the crib, bend into an upright stand, or mount onto the wall with an included mount. This versatility is great for the different stages of development, and it can be flexibly used as a security camera or baby monitor. For new babies that aren't old enough to stand up and grab the camera, it can be mounted right on the crib's upper rail, giving you the perfect view onto your sleeping baby. Then for child safety, it can be moved to the wall or on top of a nearby dresser, to stay out of baby's curious hands and give you a good vantage point into the crib. The camera hooks into your existing home wifi, and you use your smart phone to connect (there's a cell phone app for the iPhone or Android). If the camera and your phone are both connected to your home wifi, you will get real-time streaming within your home, and you can turn on privacy mode to keep the signal from traveling to the cloud for processing (i.e., it will stay in your local area network, the signal never leaves your home). This makes the stream much faster, but also makes sure that it will still work during an internet outage. When you leave your house and connect to your cellular carrier or to a different wifi, the camera's signal will travel through Amazon's cloud computing service then get bounced down to your phone's app. The cloud computing does two things. One is that it makes it possible for you to remotely connect to see your live camera wherever you are, as long as you have your phone. Second, it will analyze the sound to check for crying and send you an alert when any fussing is detected. And it seems pretty specific to crying, rather than sending alerts whenever there is a little other noise (like a door closing). It also saves little 30-second video clips from when the crying was detected, so you can go back (like with a DV-R) and see what was going on. Nice touch! And that cloud service is completely free to you, paid for by Lollipop. The digital video is streamed in high definition (720p), and we found that it has generally good video and digital audio sound quality. Even the night vision is really pretty great. One of the features we really liked, and we didn't find on any other wifi baby monitor, was the ability to stream just the audio overnight (audio mode for night nursery). So your smart phone screen can be off, and you can just use it as a basic audio-only monitor; that's a nice feature to save your phone's battery life and keep the bright screen from turning on in the middle of the night. In our testing, this worked really nicely, but it's worth noting that it only works in this mode when you are on the same wifi connection as the baby camera (i.e., you're at home). We found the video quality to be very high, though the "real-time streaming" did sometimes get a little delayed by a few seconds, especially when streaming through the cloud to our iPhone on a 4G connection. A few cool things worth mentioning. Mounting was easy, no more drilling into the crib or using adhesives. You can buy a separate sensor for about $55 that will tell you some additional information about your baby's room, like room temperature sensors, and air quality and humidity sensors; it connects to the camera via Bluetooth. You can also play sounds for your baby through the app, like white noise, trickling water, or even the sound of the vacuum. You can also setup multiple cameras to view on the same app (not at the same time though). So there are tons of great features here, and overall we thought it worked really well in our testing. Drawbacks? Well, it is a little pricey coming in around $150, just like the Cocoon Cam. It also can get pretty laggy when streaming through cellular networks, but that's not really Lollipop's fault. Note that the one currently available on Amazon as of July appears to be a knock-off Lollipop camera, in the meantime, you might need to purchase one directly through the Lollipop website. This camera deserves a much higher spot on our list, but we're worried about where you can actually get a genuine version of the monitor - we're in touch with the company and will update when we hear some news. So overall, this is a great new baby monitor with wifi that you will very likely be pleased with. We'll update this article in 6-months to talk about long-term reliability. Interested? You can check out the Lollipop Baby Monitor here.

A good WiFi monitor is convenient and feature-rich — or else we may as well stick with the HelloBaby. The iBaby takes both aspect to the next level. It was the fastest WiFi model to set up at only five minutes. Once you download the app, a straightforward tutorial walks you through every feature. We liked that you can choose both sensitivity levels and notification options for noise, motion, temperature, and humidity — meaning the iBaby won’t alert you to those quiet falling-asleep sounds, or small movements unless you want it to.
The superior wireless range of the MBP36S lets you keep connected to your baby up to 590 feet away. So even if you have a larger home, you don't have to give up safety or the ability to stay connected to your little one. An alarm sounds when you're getting out of range of the transmitting unit, so you'll never have to wonder if you're close enough to hear what's going on. A low battery alert also sounds when it's time to recharge the battery.
If you want remote access to see footage inside your home while you’re away, why not just use an indoor security camera? If that’s your sole objective, we think such cameras are a better choice than a dedicated baby monitor—and we explain which ones we like and why, in detail, in our guide to wireless indoor home security cameras. But in comparing our picks here against the Nest Camera (a popular, mainstream option, and a pick in our security camera guide), we found that security cameras start to lose their appeal when you try to use them in the ways most people regularly want to use baby monitors—at home, at night, all night, while a kid sleeps. Many won’t stream audio in the background, which means that to continuously monitor your baby, the app has to be open at all times. Some can take several seconds to pull up a live feed—not ideal when you want to see why a baby is crying. They can work well if you’re traveling and want to see what the family is up to, or if you’re out for the night and want to check on the kids without bugging the sitter—but as useful as that capability is, we concluded that it really is a different task from what most people want to accomplish with a day-to-day monitor.
The monitor uses a 2.4GHz frequency to boost the signal strength between the camera and the parent unit. In our test, the parent unit functioned 150 feet away from the camera, and it can work up to 1,000 feet away outdoors. The baby monitor alerts you once it's out of range of the camera. This earns the baby monitor a 70 percent connectivity score. We tested connectivity by positioning one unit upstairs with the monitor on the floor directly below. There was a noticeable delay on the monitor between video and audio feeds.
The first thing you need to consider is whether you want to have an audio-only baby monitor or one that incorporates video. Some parents choose to use smart home security cameras that send a video feed and alerts to their phones via an internet connection instead. Your choice largely depends on your budget and how high tech you want the baby monitor to be.
In our tests, Levana Ayden did well in the categories where Levana Keera underperformed, particularly with regards to user-friendliness. This was most noticeable in the simple controls, which are easy to learn. Levana Ayden also has a few useful extras such as a built-in nightlight and three lullabies to help sooth your baby as they sleep. This unit costs around $90, which is quite competitive with other video baby monitors. Unfortunately, the unit lacks the ability to remotely reposition the camera and has lower than average video quality, which can make details hard to see. The audio had mild interference, but this didn't affect the overall quality much. The one-year warranty is typical of video baby monitors.
Below we list our top 5 baby monitor results, some of which are self-contained units, whereas some use wifi and your smart phone. Then we detail our in-depth reviews. After our buying guide, at the end of the article you can find more details about how we evaluated each model. Note that if you're looking for a sound-only baby monitor (an audio baby monitor), click here.
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