Unlike the previous monitors that work with complementary mobile apps, Dropcam is Internet-based, making its stream accessible to anyone via computer, tablet, or smartphone. Dropcam is an HD video camera that offers a quick set-up process and provides extra features like two-way audio, and movement and sound detection alerts. Because it's Internet-based, you can give access to grandparents, friends, and family through a secure encrypted site. Another neat feature is the ability to record video to Dropcam's online DVR, letting you save and watch (and rewatch) those adorable movements from baby's nap or right after she gets up.
I was either going to buy a Pi or Arduino, and Pi won the contest. The Raspberry pi stood out because it supports the ability to be a low power computer. Needless to say it's comparing a micro-controller development board with a fully capable computer. Add a Samsung Pro SDHC card and it's ready to go. I currently use mine to run XBMC for Pi; streaming videos from my NAS, Pandora Radio, and all the "freebee" add-ons available for multimedia. It runs 1080p movies just fine with some fine tweaking of the multipliers. HDMI is great, because I don't need a separate audio connection. I can even control my Pi with my Samsung's TV remote, because XBMC supports the HDMI-CEC. The included clear case is great because it protects my Pi, and all of the LED indicators line up perfectly when everything is snapped into place. The adapter is
Additional features of the monitor include a temperature sensor , a two-way microphone to allow parents to talk to baby, sound-activated LED sensors, four pre-programmed lullabies, and an alarm. The lullaby volume cannot be changed, and while it is soft and soothing for baby, it’s pretty loud for parents to hear through the monitor. It didn’t completely drown out other noises, though.

The most important thing to look for in all kinds of baby monitors is audio quality. Regardless of whether you want a video-based baby monitor or not, you need clear audio so you can hear your baby properly. You'll also want one with sound activation so that you don't have to listen to white noise 90% of the time. With sound activation, you'll only hear the noises from your baby's room when there's something important to hear.


Every parent we spoke to agreed. A video monitor is the way to go. It’s the difference between getting up to check on your baby because you thought you heard a noise or glancing at a screen to see if you really need to get out of bed. Video monitors are useful well into the toddler years, too. That screen can help you decide whether you need to step in and comfort your child, or if you can wait out a tantrum.
Arlo's accompanying app is simple to both set up and use, and includes the beneficial "Always Listening" mode, which lets you stream audio and monitor your baby even when your phone is locked or running other apps. From the Arlo app, you’ll be able to fully control the monitor, including the ability to take a screenshot, check the live feed, receive push notifications about your baby's activity or environment, and alter the nightlight.
The Nest Cam isn’t a dedicated baby monitor, but an all-around home protection device. Besides aiming the camera at the crib, you can also use it to keep an eye on the nanny, the dog or your empty home while you’re away. The video camera can be set up anywhere, and you can watch the live streaming from your smartphone. It also has two-way communication so you can soothe your little one to sleep, even if you’re offsite. If the device senses motion or sound, it’ll send a phone alert or an email to you. Missed what happened? From the app, you can view photos of any activity that took place over the last three hours. (There are Nest Aware subscriptions available that provide access to 5, 10 or 30 days of recordings, for $5, $10 or $30 a month, respectively). The picture quality is super sharp, too.
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