All baby monitors should have clear sound quality, minimal (or no) interference and a good range and signal strength (which manufacturers often exaggerate), particularly if you have a larger home and garden. If you want to see your child, as well as hear them, you’ll need a video monitor. Or perhaps you’ll be more reassured by movement sensor pads, which sit underneath the mattress and set off an alarm if there’s no movement for 20 seconds – although for some people, this just causes more anxiety (and there is no evidence it can actually prevent cot death). 
As a parent, your baby’s health and safety are of paramount importance. Therefore, you and other parents may use a baby monitor to make sure that your kids are safe and sound. There are many baby monitor options available including those from brands such as Samsung and Motorola, so it is important to know what features these models have to make the right decision for your family.
If you want to spend as little as possible without compromising on quality, this basic digital model is easy to get going and doesn’t mind being dropped. It has a better range than others we tried in this price range and the sound quality is good too, although you might struggle to hear clearly at low volumes. Don’t expect any whizzy features – you can’t talk back to your baby and there’s no warning to let you know if you’re out of signal range, for instance. There is a low-battery alarm, but you can’t recharge either unit. We’d have liked the units to be easier to tell apart, but for less than £20, this is still a very good investment.
If you’re a fan of movement sensor pads, this one works well (except on a memory foam mattress). The audio quality is good, while on the parent unit the battery life is over a day. The signal is brilliant, even in the garden – and as soon as it weakens, you’ll get a warning alarm (which also goes off when the battery is low). We also found the temperature sensor and sound-sensitive lights lived up to their promise and the belt-clip quick to attach. But good luck setting it up – the instructions aren’t great and, unusually, it doesn’t have rechargeable batteries.

Most monitors (including our pick) are designed for use at home, usually while the baby is less than a few hundred feet away, well within range of a local video stream that bypasses the Internet. But many people want to use the monitor remotely—either to see what’s happening at home while they’re at work, traveling, or out on a date. For those needs, a Wi-Fi–enabled monitor, like our also-great pick, is the way to go. A Wi-Fi–enabled model works fine at home, too, but it’s not quite as simple as one that skips the routine connection and login hassles, as well as the potential security concerns, of a Web-based video option.
Our testers preferred the Baby Delight’s parent unit — its buttons were more responsive than Angelcare and it was easier to set up. This movement monitor uses a cordless magnetic sensor instead of a pad. Because the sensor is clipped onto your baby’s onesie, right next to their chest, the alarm won’t go off if you forget to disarm it before a middle-of-the-night feeding.
To save on battery life, some audio/video models only turn on when the baby makes an unusual motion or sound. Some models come with a motion-detector pad that fits under the crib sheet. This type of motion sensor is intended to prevent SIDS. Sensitive enough to detect changes in breathing, an alarm sounds if there is no movement after 20 minutes. However, if the baby simply rolls off the pad, the alarm may sound.
If you’ve put your little one down for a nap then our range of BT audio baby monitors will alert you if they need you. With a choice of 18 different soothing lullabies to choose from to help them drift off to sleep, you can even control the temperature and project a wonderful lightshow onto the ceiling. You can then listen out for any signs of distress through the wireless receiver.
Gone are the days of silently peeking into the nursery to check on your napping baby and then, whoops, accidentally waking them up (“No, no, please no!”). A baby monitor uses a camera to watch over the crib, while you carry a handheld device that lets you know what’s going on with your child at any given moment, no matter where you are in your home. There are also other monitors that track sleep or breathing either with a clip or sock.
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