So happy I found this monitor! I previously had a more high tech video monitor from another company that had a ton of features, but malfunctioned on me within a month. I replaced it with the same one thinking it was a one off, but sure enough it started acting funny within a couple weeks. This monitor has been great I'm amazed at the battery life and range it has. My only complaint is that the power adapter cord for the camera needs to be a lot longer to have more options of hanging it on a wall while keeping it a distance from babies reach.
Compared with other Wi-Fi–enabled video monitors, the Arlo has advantages. As a product from a reputable manufacturer of home-security cameras—another Arlo model is an also-great pick in our guide to the best outdoor security cameras—the Arlo’s hardware and app support have a larger owner base and a longer track record than similar platforms supporting more recently launched baby monitors. You can see the difference in comparing the tens of thousands of satisfied reviews on Arlo’s app to the weak handful of reviews you typically see about Wi-Fi–enabled competitors. Those Arlo app reviews, which span over two dozen updates dating back to 2016, suggest a history of successful app support and satisfied customers. We often see promising new Wi-Fi monitors emerge, and we consider all of them fairly, but until they withstand the test of time like Arlo has, it’s hard to justify recommending any of them over the more proven option.
- the button placement makes it easy to accidentally switch on the annoying music (why would you want this feature on a baby monitor???) that the camera can pipe (loudly) out in the baby's room. You know where this is going - the stupid music that you didn't want in the first place turns on and wakes up the baby you just spent an hour trying to put down. FML.
In addition to being untested for efficacy, physiologic monitors can increase both your stress and your baby’s stress with false alarms and unnecessary trips to the hospital. Dr. Christopher Bonafide, of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia wrote that parents are increasingly bringing healthy babies to the hospital over a false alarm, noting that changes that often set off a monitor are “just normal fluctuations.”
Right from the start, this video monitor never worked and was unreliable. The longest I would get a connection was 14 seconds. That's right - seconds. Even when I had the base literally 3 feet from the monitor, I would loose the connection in a matter of seconds. Plus the cord for the base was loose. The only was I could keep it in was if I held it there. It's going back today!
The Babysense Video Baby Monitor seems to be popular—although Fakespot rates its reviews a C—and it has a smaller video screen than our pick. The battery life may be a little lower as well (the manufacturer doesn’t offer a claim on battery life, and many reviewers say they either keep it plugged in or get acceptable battery life on an audio-only eco mode). At this price, about half the cost of our pick, those compromises may seem acceptable to you. It shares many other features with our pick, including two-way talk-back, pan/tilt/zoom options, and a temperature display.

As easy-to-use as it is adorable, the bunny-eared Netgear Arlo baby monitor matches your nursery’s décor while providing top-quality features and one of the best companion apps on the market. Measuring just 4.3 x 2.6 x 2.5 inches with the option for wall mounting, this device has a resolution between 360p and 1080p and includes six prerecorded lullabies. It even lets you upload your own playlist or record your own songs to play in the nursery, and has a color-changing nightlight for a soothing ambiance. But beyond its kid-friendly design, the Arlo is also a fully capable baby monitor that's outfitted with functionalities parents will love, like infrared night vision and temperature and air quality sensors.
Wireless systems use radio frequencies that are designated by governments for unlicensed use. For example, in North America frequencies near 49 MHz, 902 MHz or 2.4 GHz are available. While these frequencies are not assigned to powerful television or radio broadcasting transmitters, interference from other wireless devices such as cordless telephones, wireless toys, computer wireless networks, radar, Smart Power Meters and microwave ovens is possible.
Credit: NetgearCuteness aside, the Arlo Baby is compact enough to fit into even the most crowded nursery; a wall mount is included if you prefer that option. While you plug the camera in to power it, you can also detach the camera and move it into any room where an impromptu nap occurs, though we only saw three hours of battery life when we tried this out.
It may surprise you to hear that simply being able to last through the night, unplugged, with the display off, qualifies as exceptional battery life for a baby monitor. The Infant Optics was one of the only monitors in our testing that could easily do that, and then last a while longer the next day before needing a charge. (The manufacturer claims it lasts 10 hours with the display off—we got that amount of time off of a full charge, even when checking the display intermittently.) This model also charges via a USB connection, which sets it apart from competitors, some of which use ineffective and inconvenient proprietary DC chargers or even disposable batteries.

Video is streamed wirelessly in real time to a slim 3.5-inch LCD color display module, providing a crystal-clear image without grainy or pixelated images. There’s a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission that provides both privacy and delay-free video and audio feedback. The monitor system has a portable power source that lasts an average of 10 hours in power saving mode, and six hours with the display screen constantly on. It can be charge anywhere that has a USB import, such as laptops or desktop computers.

Traditional versus Wifi Baby Monitors: Starting around 2010, parents began to switch from using baby monitors with a yoked camera and screen, to using wifi cameras that can stream over smart phones, tablets, and personal computers. At the time, there weren't very many wifi cameras aimed towards the baby gear market, so people were going with familiar wifi camera brands like Nest and Samsung. Over the next few years, companies slowly began introducing baby-themed wifi cameras onto the market. While even high-quality HD wifi cameras can be found for under $50 (like this one) nowadays, companies began to realize they could package a wifi camera as a baby monitor, change the colors and themes of the app, and charge 3-4 times the price. And they continue to use this strategy to this day! So which is better? Well, this really comes down to one thing: do you want to be able to view the nursery while you're not at home? If you answer yes to this question, then you need to use a wifi monitor as opposed to a typical baby monitor. A wifi baby monitor (or any wifi camera) will connect to your internet (some are wired, some through wifi only) and stream live (well, slightly delated) video to an app on your phone. That will work in the house or out of the house, as long as you have a fast internet connection. So you can simply BYOP (bring your own phone) and leverage 20th century technology! That seems really appealing, and we highly recommend some of the newer ones (like the Cocoon Cam, Lollipop, and Nanit), but there are some things to keep in mind when figuring out the type of monitor to buy:


No ordinary monitor, the Cocoon Cam lets you see your baby and a graph that shows breathing patterns on your smartphone. The camera watches the rise and fall of your child’s chest and sends an instant notification if something seems off. You’ll also get alerts when your child has fallen asleep, is crying or is about to wake up. Since the Cocoon Cam live streams the video and audio over WiFi, you can watch your baby from anywhere.
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