Another prominent Wi-Fi–enabled monitor is the Withings Home video monitor, which we dismissed without testing. The most notable drawback to the Withings is that currently more than a third of Amazon reviewers give it two or fewer stars (out of five), citing problems similar to what you see on most other Wi-Fi video monitors: bad connectivity, a bad picture, unreliable air-quality sensors, and issues with overall quality and durability. In reply to some of the negative reviews, Nokia stated that it was looking into making improvements to this model. The rebranded version, the Nokia Home Video & Air Quality Monitor, shows a similar negative pattern in its reviews (the app also has poor reviews).
- the button placement makes it easy to accidentally switch on the annoying music (why would you want this feature on a baby monitor???) that the camera can pipe (loudly) out in the baby's room. You know where this is going - the stupid music that you didn't want in the first place turns on and wakes up the baby you just spent an hour trying to put down. FML.
The Babysense monitor features a 2.4-inch HD LCD screen with high-quality video transmission up to 900 feet. Features to keep you better connected to your baby include infrared night vision, 2x digital zoom, pan and tilt, temperature alerts if it’s too hot or cold and two-way talkback. It also has multi-camera expandability with the ability to incorporate three additional cameras (sold separately). This monitor doesn't alert you to your baby's activity, but it does indicate connectivity and battery problems, and you can set reminder alarms for feeding times, etc.
The BT Video Monitor 6000 features 5 relaxing lullabies, perfect for soothing your little one to sleep. Sound level lights keep you aware of baby’s sounds even when you don’t want to hear every snuffle. The video monitor’s remote control pan, tilt and zoom allow you to adjust the camera to focus on your baby, making sure you never miss a moment. With night vision, you can keep watch over your little one even in the dark.
It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
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