Both Kay and Baldwin chose the Infant Optics DXR-8 as their top choice in video baby monitors (it also has nearly 24,000 4.4-star reviews on Amazon). The DXR-8 uses secure 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission (as opposed to Wi-Fi) to send crystal clear color video and audio to the receiver, has a solid battery life, allows for remote pan, zoom, and tilt capabilities, and comes with an interchangeable zoom lens (with a wide-angle lens sold separately). Other features include a two-way intercom, remote temperature display, and the option to set the monitor to audio-only.
Long one of Amazon’s best-selling baby monitors, the DXR-5 has the benefit of almost 3,000 Amazon customer reviews (at 3.8 stars out of 5) — and almost half of the reviewers award the product a five star rating. With a very affordable price, clear audio and day/night video and a battery saving auto dormancy feature triggered by baby’s inactivity, the DXR-5 has been praised by a legion of parents and caregivers. Minor gripes include the monitor’s battery; it’s a camera battery as opposed to the standard batteries used by most other baby cam manufacturers. Also, in response to customer complaints, Infant Optics reprogrammed the DXR-5’s firmware to eliminate the “beeping” noise the monitor made when in dormancy mode.
At night, switch to "audio only" mode to use it as a traditional monitor, or use the camera's infrared night vision to keep an eye on your little one even when it's dark. If your baby needs comforting, the two-way talk feature lets you communicate with them even if you aren’t in the same room. The Shiloh also has built-in temperature monitoring that lets you know if your baby's room is getting uncomfortably hot or cold. The battery lasts for up to 12 hours at a time.
It uses 2.4GHz FHSS technology that offers a private connection between the monitor in your baby's room and the dedicated viewer in your hand. The FHSS connection should minimize interference, and most reviewers say the audio is clear. In BabyGearLab's testing, the reviewer found that the Phillips AVENT had the best audio signal of any of the monitors it tested.
A standard video baby monitor is the first step up from audio-only baby monitors. They all come with two parts: the parent unit, consisting of a portable display screen, and the baby unit, which includes the camera and its stand. If you just want the basics or have an unreliable internet connect, a standard video monitor will help you watch over your baby without the price tag of more feature-heavy WiFi monitors.
The system’s viewing screen has a row of LEDs, which allow you to see the sound of your baby’s voice, and alerts you if he or she is crying. The system has two-way talk, so if you want to calm your baby down, you can speak into the intercom push-to-talk button. Plus, the screen has a remote in-room temperature display, so you can always see if your baby is comfortable and safe.

- the parent unit shows the current temperature in the baby's room, which is perfect for Moms like me who worry all the time that their little one is too cold or too hot. The temperature can be displayed in Celsius or Fahrenheit, and you can even set an alarm that notifies you if the temperature is too high or too low; this is probably one of my favorite features, and I don't know of too many other monitors that have this

It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
×