Our testers preferred the Baby Delight’s parent unit — its buttons were more responsive than Angelcare and it was easier to set up. This movement monitor uses a cordless magnetic sensor instead of a pad. Because the sensor is clipped onto your baby’s onesie, right next to their chest, the alarm won’t go off if you forget to disarm it before a middle-of-the-night feeding.
Terrible - lost connection throughout the night for the first few nights. Arlo support claimed it was a firmware issue and insisted it would be fixed upon updating to a new version. Once updated, still had the same issue. I’m not alone in this issue - check the Arlo Community boards regarding this product. I sent it back and bought the Nest cam and use it without issues as a baby monitor.
To test each camera’s night vision, we used the monitors in darkened bedrooms with blackout curtains, with and without night-lights. For a more extreme test, we set the cameras up in a windowless room in a basement with a towel blocking light from the door. We aimed all of the cameras at a doll’s face approximately 6 feet across the room, looked at the monitors, and tried not to creep ourselves out.
This funky-looking video monitor costs a bomb, but we think the fantastic picture quality and night vision image, along with the ability to monitor your baby from your phone and share images, with your other half, for example, justifies the hefty price-tag. We weren’t initially convinced as pairing it up with your smartphone is a bit tricky, but once we got going, we were wowed by how easy it was to talk to your baby, check the temperature (and even humidity) in your baby’s room and play lullabies or white noise to help get your baby to sleep – not to mention seeing and hearing them at all times. But if the wi-fi connection isn’t good where you are (for example, when you’re on holiday), then this won’t be good either.
Monitor options: We wanted easy, intuitive, responsive controls, whether they were on a touchscreen or physical buttons. We also wanted the monitor to withstand being knocked off of a nightstand or messed with by a toddler, and generally be tough enough for the rigors of life in a home with young children. We didn’t really care if we could set an alarm, use the monitor as a night-light, or play chintzy music through the camera—but seeing the temperature in the kids’ room was a detail we appreciated.
The main positive is the battery life and screen refresh. Our Motorola would have to be pretty much constantly be on charge, where as this will last the 5 hours we need in the evening easily and not use half the battery. And the camera refreshes well meaning you can pan and tilt easily, the Motorola was very jumpy. Also it means you have a better idea of babies movements. The refresh isn't perfect, but it's more than capable for the task at hand.

Why spend money on a baby monitor, which serves a single specific purpose, when you could use an indoor home-security camera that you can repurpose once your kid leaves the nursery? We wondered the same thing, so along with with dedicated video baby monitors, we tested a Nest Indoor Cam, currently among our top-rated wireless home security cameras.
With a 1,000-foot range and DECT technology, the VTech Safe & Sound Digital Audio relays sound with excellent clarity. Two-way communication offers a way to calm a baby when he or she is waking up or trying to fall asleep. It also includes a night light for late-night feedings. The digital display indicates signal strength and power/battery life. This monitor offers a full range of alarms when your baby wakes — audio, indicator lights, and vibration.
Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.
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