We had the 150 for our daughter and bought the 250 when our son was born. The 250 has superior sound quality but thats all it has going for it. The battery life is very poor, it no longer lasts more than five hours so when we take it up to bed with us it starts beeping at about 4am. There is a number to call for replacement batteries but they never answer the phone.
Below we list our top 5 baby monitor results, some of which are self-contained units, whereas some use wifi and your smart phone. Then we detail our in-depth reviews. After our buying guide, at the end of the article you can find more details about how we evaluated each model. Note that if you're looking for a sound-only baby monitor (an audio baby monitor), click here.
We began by shopping for baby monitors like anyone else would if they had dozens of hours to do it. The process started with a long list of best sellers at Amazon, Walmart, Target, BuyBuy Baby, and Costco. We found monitors recommended in editorial reviews, such as from PCMag, Reviewed, and Tom’s Guide. We also read a ton of discussion among parents in the Amazon reviews—what features they found especially useful, and what problems tend to occur. Thinking of all of this, and comparing those concerns against the things we’ve appreciated and despised in our own years of monitor use, we developed the following selection criteria:

- the button placement makes it easy to accidentally switch on the annoying music (why would you want this feature on a baby monitor???) that the camera can pipe (loudly) out in the baby's room. You know where this is going - the stupid music that you didn't want in the first place turns on and wakes up the baby you just spent an hour trying to put down. FML.
There are several criteria on which the Arlo does have a clear advantage over our pick. The video quality is much better (to be frank, the video quality on the Infant Optics, though passable for a basic night-vision camera, is laughable by modern smartphone standards). Zooming on the Arlo camera is a more intuitive pinch motion. And, obviously, being able to check in remotely on the video stream is invaluable for a working or traveling parent who wants to see a child while away; our local-video-feed monitor can’t offer that. The option to store video in the cloud is another advantage here that you don’t get with our pick. In other ways they’re equal—both offer temperature monitoring (the Arlo’s is more detailed, with humidity and vague “air quality” readings), both have talk-back features, both can play little tunes for your kid, both have kind of cryptic control icons to activate these features. The Arlo, unlike the Infant Optics, has a multicolored night-light option that sounds gimmicky but is actually quite beautiful and fun for a kid’s room.
When it came time to put LO in his room on the opposite end of the house I was a nervous wreck. I decided on this monitor because of the good reviews and price point. After using it for several months, now I can say I love it. It made the transition so much easier than it would have been with a regular monitor. I love that it can play different melodies and has a 2 way microphone. Also love the room temp display and the clock on the screen. You can adjust the backlight to your liking. This monitor does not have the controls that allow it to be turned by remote. It is stationary so set it up where you can see baby if he or she moves. It also comes in handy if you have a sneaky toddler during nap time. I can set it up and if she tries sneaking around I can tell her to get back into bed ;)
We had the 150 for our daughter and bought the 250 when our son was born. The 250 has superior sound quality but thats all it has going for it. The battery life is very poor, it no longer lasts more than five hours so when we take it up to bed with us it starts beeping at about 4am. There is a number to call for replacement batteries but they never answer the phone.

If you'd like to keep watch over your little one while they slumber, pick a video baby monitor. Whether you're at home or a little further away, you can use a real-time baby monitor camera to connect to your WiFi and check in on baby during nap times. Colour monitors work a little like your regular tablet, making them easy to pop in your bag or prop up on the coffee table. Choose from models that track temperature, alert you to sound and movement and even sing lullabies to settle baby if they get restless.
We had stopped using the monitor a few months ago post sleep training but recently decided to bring it back as we are about take her pacifier and we are in the month log transition to one nap. Welp I couldn’t see anything so I ordered this handy dandy mount arm thing. It was set up in 3 minutes and I’m staring at my sleeping angel and can see pacifier. The way it holds the camera by the base is great. It’s pointed in the right direction and I can adjust the view with the monitor. I have a Motorola connect WiFi camera. I don’t know about durability yet. We have it set up on furniture facing down into her bed.
Will Greenwald has been covering consumer technology for a decade, and has served on the editorial staffs of CNET.com, Sound & Vision, and Maximum PC. His work and analysis has been seen in GamePro, Tested.com, Geek.com, and several other publications. He currently covers consumer electronics in the PC Labs as the in-house home entertainment expert... See Full Bio

Motion and audio sensors: In the old days, parents were forced to endure a consistent ambient hiss from their audio monitors while they listened for their child’s stirrings or cries. Mercifully, many modern baby monitors will stay in “quiet mode” until they detect motion and/or sound, which will trigger an alert, such as activating the handheld video display or pushing a notification to your smartphone.
This monitor is known for its zoom lens, included in the box, that lets you see your baby up close even if you have to position it farther away from the crib. You can use the monitor to remotely adjust the camera, and you don’t have to worry about plugging the monitor in overnight—it can sit on your nightstand for up to 10 hours in the power-saving mode (similar to sleep mode on your computer, but it still provides sound monitoring while the display is off) and up to six hours with the display screen constantly on.
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