This is a criticism of the Amazon page more than of the product. It seems that most (all?) of the reviews are labeled as being for the various Pi 2 kits, but are in fact for earlier versions of the kits (Pi B and Pi B+) which had different kit components. The Base kit used to contain a case apparently so there are reviews labeled "Basic Pi 2 Kit" discussing the case and I was expecting a case when the Basic kit arrived.
Receiving 4.1 out of 5 stars (and well over 500 5 star reviews) based on about 900 reviews from Amazon customers, the Dropcam Pro is lauded for its “very good video quality,” premium material assembly, quick and easy setup/commissioning and a field of view (130° diagonal) wider than most of its competitors. It also has PTZ (pan/tilt/zoom) camera and two-way talkback. Note that this product does not come with a separate, dedicated monitor; it uses mobile and web apps capability for PCDs such as smartphones, tablets and other computing devices. The Dropcam Pro supports dual band Wi-Fi (the standard 2.4 GHz and 5GHz) for improved wireless connectivity.

On many of our requirements, the Infant Optics DXR-8 delivers as well as the best monitors we tried: It has an adequate range for home use, acceptable image quality, an ability to add on multiple cameras, and overall simplicity and ease of use with a minimum of annoying quirks. It doesn’t offer the remote access or video storage options of our Wi-Fi–enabled pick, and its dedicated monitor may not seem as convenient as accessing a view via your smartphone—but the Infant Optics is easier to use where it matters most: You just pick it up, poke a button, and put it back down. Most of its specific flaws concern battery life and charging, but this is a common problem among baby monitors, and the company has a good record of responding to customer service issues.


If you're in a hurry, the summary of this review is that this camera and monitor are great and the customer service provided by the company is outstanding (see below). So stop hunting and trying to weigh all the baby camera/monitor reviews and get this camera and monitor if it provides you with all the features you want. You really aren't going to find anything better.
We have had two of these, so far! First one stopped working after 6 months. The second stopped working after about 18 months. Initially the digital display started deteriorating. You couldn't read the temp etc until it got to the point that there were just random black marks; totally useless. Eventually it just stopped working and wouldn't switch on. Only saving grace is that sound is pretty good. Between the first and the second one we had a Motorola one and that lasted 4 days before it was returned as we couldn't hear a thing. Not sure whether we'll buy the same one again? If you're happy to consider replacing your baby monitor perhaps even more than once, then this is for you! Surely there must be decent reliable monitors available that not only have good sound but will actually last a few years??
Works as good as the original! Glad I found this replacement! We didn't realize that we could replace the battery! Thought we might have to buy another monitor! Found this solution before buying another one... Much cheaper solution! About 1 &1/2 to 2 hours on video, but will last several hours if only listening and looking at video when necessary!😉
If your internet goes down, your baby monitor goes down. A wifi baby monitor uses your home's internet connection to communicate to servers, then to your app. So if your internet connection goes down, then you will no longer be able to stream video of your baby. That's a huge consideration to keep in mind because you never know when your internet will slow down or simply stop working for several minutes or hours, and you will be stuck without a working baby monitor. There are a few wifi baby monitors that will still communicate locally (within your home's network) when the internet goes down, such as the Lollipop or Nanit. They do this by switching from internet to local area network when an outage is detected, so you can have confidence that if you're connected to your home wifi you'll still see your baby.
I purchased this monitor to use in our chicken coop to watch over the baby chicks and before continuing I would like to say, I'm very particular on quality on everything I purchase and I can truthfully say that this review is my honest opinion. After unpacking and taking a good look I find the monitor and camera to be excellent quality and workmanship. After charging the monitor and powered up the camera and monitor I had instant video, these also have audio and you can talk back in fourth, you can adjust the monitor lighter or darker and it has music you can turn on and off. The monitor runs 8 hours on a full charge allowing you to carry it with you. Our chicks haven't hatch yet and I can't wait to watch them and keep tabs on there heat lamps. I recommend this monitor.
The interface on the monitor, aka the parent unit, is basic, simple, and intuitive, while many of its competitors have awkward controls. When panning and tilting the camera, for example, the Infant Optics responds immediately and can move in very small increments. The text on the menu displays look like something off of an old Motorola RAZR, but the commands are easy to interpret and less confusing than those of some competitors. A group of four buttons makes it easy to pull up the menu and make a change (to the volume, say) without losing sight of the image on the screen. Other nice minor touches, like a display that constantly notes the temperature in the baby’s room, appear on this model but not on all of its competitors. This is not a touchscreen, but frankly, if you’ve ever used an iPhone, you’ll find the touchscreens on most baby monitors to be sorely substandard.
With two cameras and the option to add two more, the Levana Shiloh Video Baby Monitor allows you to watch multiple rooms and multiple children, a feature that's enhanced by the monitor's split-screen mode. The five-inch touchscreen is super lightweight and easy to use, and can be charged via USB. It even has customizable timers and alerts to track feeding and napping.
However, the Baby Delight’s biggest flaw is one of technicality: Its button sensor is just large enough to avoid being labeled as a choking hazard, but it doesn’t leave a lot of room for error. In fact, the button does become a choking risk after your child is 3 years old, and the new parents we spoke to felt uneasy about using it after 12 months just to be safe. Still, if you’re only interested in monitoring movements for the first few months, the Baby Delight is a more user-friendly alternative to the Angelcare.
When it came time to put LO in his room on the opposite end of the house I was a nervous wreck. I decided on this monitor because of the good reviews and price point. After using it for several months, now I can say I love it. It made the transition so much easier than it would have been with a regular monitor. I love that it can play different melodies and has a 2 way microphone. Also love the room temp display and the clock on the screen. You can adjust the backlight to your liking. This monitor does not have the controls that allow it to be turned by remote. It is stationary so set it up where you can see baby if he or she moves. It also comes in handy if you have a sneaky toddler during nap time. I can set it up and if she tries sneaking around I can tell her to get back into bed ;)
We also liked the iBaby because while it allowed us to invite other users to see through the camera — great if you want to give your babysitter access while you’re out — only the person who registered the iBaby monitor has administrator access to all of the features. The administrator can give some privileges to other users, like being able to move the camera around, but they can take them away just as quickly.

After considering 43 of the most highly rated baby monitors and testing nine of them for more than 140 hours—on top of more than six years of regular monitor use as parents—we’re confident that the Infant Optics DXR-8 is the best baby monitor available. Compared with competitors, it has a more intuitive interface that’s easier to use, better battery life on its parent unit (aka the monitor), and a general simplicity and reliability that make it the easiest to use overall.


Just because you’re pulling double diaper duty doesn’t mean you need to buy two baby monitors. If you’re a twin mom, simply look for a monitor that can accommodate add-on cameras. The Babysense Video Monitor comes with two digital cameras right out of the box (and can handle up to four), making this the best baby monitor for twins. With the push of a button, you can toggle between views of your twin babes. Plus, this monitor features digital pan/tilt and zoom, two-way communication, room temperature monitoring and a 900-foot range.
The iBaby’s video and audio quality were among the best in the WiFi group, but like all WiFi monitors, quality and how well it displays real-time action depends largely on your internet quality and speed. Our testers only experienced a delay of less than a second, more noticeable than HelloBaby’s, but nowhere close to Motorola’s three-second delay.

This baby monitor is pretty impressive. The camera can see around the room great and very clear, even when you zoom its clear. The two way talking is a great feature. Night vision is super clear as well, even while zooming. The monitor has a room temperature feature and will alert you if its getting too hot or too cold. I added some sweet lullabies that play when its naptime which is awesome and convenient haha! Loving this thing so far. Hope it lasts forever lol.


But although the Arlo can be really impressive, it can also be annoying. Leaving aside that surprisingly impressive night-light, we found in testing that we weren’t using most of those extra features beyond trying them out for novelty’s sake. The Arlo is clearly the way to go if you want to access your camera while away from home. But baby monitors are far more commonly used in our own homes, often by our beds, running all night, with the video off and the audio on, and we peek in if there’s a sign of trouble. That’s about it.
Instead, baby monitors offer more options for letting you know when something might be wrong at that moment. Temperature and humidity measurements are common among high-end monitors, along with alerts and notifications for when movement or a lack of movement is detected. The Baby Delight 5" Video, Movement and Positioning Monitor, for example, includes a pendant sensor that monitors your infant's movement and breathing patterns, letting you know if it gets too quiet or still.

It may surprise you to hear that simply being able to last through the night, unplugged, with the display off, qualifies as exceptional battery life for a baby monitor. The Infant Optics was one of the only monitors in our testing that could easily do that, and then last a while longer the next day before needing a charge. (The manufacturer claims it lasts 10 hours with the display off—we got that amount of time off of a full charge, even when checking the display intermittently.) This model also charges via a USB connection, which sets it apart from competitors, some of which use ineffective and inconvenient proprietary DC chargers or even disposable batteries.
If you’re looking to spend under $100 on a video monitor, Baldwin recommends the Babysense baby monitor as a solid budget pick. For $75, it comes equipped with a 2.4-inch HD LCD color screen, secure interference-free connection and 2.4 GHz digital wireless transmission, two-way intercom, digital zoom, infrared night vision, room-temperature monitoring, and more.
×