It’s hard not to like the crystal-clear picture you get on this monitor’s 7-inch screen (the biggest screen on this list!). Its standalone camera can be moved from room to room and will remotely pan, tilt and zoom. Given the cost, this monitor is best if you want full control of the nursery environment. It syncs with the Smart Nursery humidifier and the Dream Machine sound and light machine. Once connected, you can turn on lullabies, project lights onto the ceiling and increase the room’s humidity all from your monitor.
Your baby needs constant attention, but you can't be in its room every hour of every day. That's what baby monitors are for. What started as audio-only infant care devices to let you listen in on your child from another room, have since added video cameras and connected features to the mix so you can always keep an eye on your little one. There are still some great audio monitors out there—here we're focusing on models that also provide some form of video feed.
We had the 150 for our daughter and bought the 250 when our son was born. The 250 has superior sound quality but thats all it has going for it. The battery life is very poor, it no longer lasts more than five hours so when we take it up to bed with us it starts beeping at about 4am. There is a number to call for replacement batteries but they never answer the phone.

By default, Arlo Baby records in 720p resolution, though you can switch to 1080p if you prefer. You can also adjust the field of view and fine-tune notifications on what triggers an alert. You do have to position the camera manually, however, and the gap between getting a notification on our phone and actually being able to jump to live video was a little laggy for our tastes.


A baby monitor, also known as a baby alarm, is a radio system used to remotely listen to sounds made by an infant. An audio monitor consists of a transmitter unit, equipped with a microphone, placed near to the child. It transmits the sounds by radio waves to a receiver unit with a speaker carried by, or near to, the person caring for the infant. Some baby monitors provide two-way communication which allows the parent to speak back to the baby (parent talk-back). Some allow music to be played to the child. A monitor with a video camera and receiver is often called a baby cam.

You can control the Arlo via multiple platforms, including Alexa, HomeKit, Google Assistant, and IFTTT. The camera itself can work wirelessly off a rechargeable battery for several hours (which no other monitor we’ve tested can do), and it can track and chart several days’ worth of temperature or humidity in a child’s room. You can set it to notify you if it detects unusual temperatures, humidity levels, or “air quality,” a VOC measure the Arlo Baby manual (PDF) suggests you alleviate by either opening a window or removing the source of the VOCs. (Our also-great pick for the best air purifier is one of the few that actually does genuinely eliminate VOCs, but it ain’t cheap.) If you find that the notifications are too frequent, you can adjust what’s triggering the alerts (by raising the threshold up to 80 ºF, for example, if you don’t want a notification telling you it’s too hot at 76 ºF). You can store video from the camera online, but in six years of parenthood we’ve never once wanted to review baby monitor footage.
Why spend money on a baby monitor, which serves a single specific purpose, when you could use an indoor home-security camera that you can repurpose once your kid leaves the nursery? We wondered the same thing, so along with with dedicated video baby monitors, we tested a Nest Indoor Cam, currently among our top-rated wireless home security cameras.
The Babysense Video Baby Monitor seems to be popular—although Fakespot rates its reviews a C—and it has a smaller video screen than our pick. The battery life may be a little lower as well (the manufacturer doesn’t offer a claim on battery life, and many reviewers say they either keep it plugged in or get acceptable battery life on an audio-only eco mode). At this price, about half the cost of our pick, those compromises may seem acceptable to you. It shares many other features with our pick, including two-way talk-back, pan/tilt/zoom options, and a temperature display.
The iBaby M6S was a former recommendation for a Wi-Fi–enabled monitor, but it falls short compared with the Arlo. It shares a few positive aspects—access from your phone anywhere, no need to worry about keeping track of a separate dedicated monitor, and the ability to record the camera’s footage. However, as we noted in long-term tests (and confirmed in the iBaby’s negative reviews), the app is pretty poorly done, and lost connections are a persistent problem.

We took these criteria into consideration, factored in user feedback and reviews from across the Web, and eventually narrowed the list to eight cameras for testing. We used each camera for several months, taking notes on the interface and any difficulties we ran into. We connected each model to multiple routers, and used each from various distances and through walls to test range. We also ran each monitor from a full charge down to zero to check battery life. Finally, we evaluated each monitor's night vision in dark environments. Read more about our tests in our full guide to baby monitors.

The VTech DM221 audio monitor is the best choice in the category—it’s consistently a best seller at multiple retailers, with strong reviews (four out five stars across 5,400 reviews on Amazon, as of September 2018) and similarly high ratings at Walmart, Target, and BuyBuy Baby. We wanted to recommend a less expensive video monitor, but every product that we tried at any price notably lower than our pick had such serious problems—usually poor video quality and ongoing connection issues—that we feel a higher-end audio-only monitor offers a much better value for a limited budget.

There are several criteria on which the Arlo does have a clear advantage over our pick. The video quality is much better (to be frank, the video quality on the Infant Optics, though passable for a basic night-vision camera, is laughable by modern smartphone standards). Zooming on the Arlo camera is a more intuitive pinch motion. And, obviously, being able to check in remotely on the video stream is invaluable for a working or traveling parent who wants to see a child while away; our local-video-feed monitor can’t offer that. The option to store video in the cloud is another advantage here that you don’t get with our pick. In other ways they’re equal—both offer temperature monitoring (the Arlo’s is more detailed, with humidity and vague “air quality” readings), both have talk-back features, both can play little tunes for your kid, both have kind of cryptic control icons to activate these features. The Arlo, unlike the Infant Optics, has a multicolored night-light option that sounds gimmicky but is actually quite beautiful and fun for a kid’s room.
We had the 150 for our daughter and bought the 250 when our son was born. The 250 has superior sound quality but thats all it has going for it. The battery life is very poor, it no longer lasts more than five hours so when we take it up to bed with us it starts beeping at about 4am. There is a number to call for replacement batteries but they never answer the phone.
If you’re looking to spend under $100 on a video monitor, Baldwin recommends the Babysense baby monitor as a solid budget pick. For $75, it comes equipped with a 2.4-inch HD LCD color screen, secure interference-free connection and 2.4 GHz digital wireless transmission, two-way intercom, digital zoom, infrared night vision, room-temperature monitoring, and more.
WiFi Baby boasts a secure and clear connection to your baby through its high-quality camera. Using a WiFi or 3G/4G network, you can access the password-protected stream directly from your Mac or PC, or through several third-party apps, on an iOS or Android device. Like the Dropcam monitor, WiFi Baby has a video recording function that gives you the option of reviewing past footage, which comes in handy if you end up using it as a nanny cam or security camera for the house. Using the WiFi Baby-compatible apps, you can stream live video and audio feeds of up to four cameras simultaneously.
The Babysense monitor features a 2.4-inch HD LCD screen with high-quality video transmission up to 900 feet. Features to keep you better connected to your baby include infrared night vision, 2x digital zoom, pan and tilt, temperature alerts if it’s too hot or cold and two-way talkback. It also has multi-camera expandability with the ability to incorporate three additional cameras (sold separately). This monitor doesn't alert you to your baby's activity, but it does indicate connectivity and battery problems, and you can set reminder alarms for feeding times, etc.
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This baby monitor is pretty impressive. The camera can see around the room great and very clear, even when you zoom its clear. The two way talking is a great feature. Night vision is super clear as well, even while zooming. The monitor has a room temperature feature and will alert you if its getting too hot or too cold. I added some sweet lullabies that play when its naptime which is awesome and convenient haha! Loving this thing so far. Hope it lasts forever lol.
If you’re looking to spend under $100 on a video monitor, Baldwin recommends the Babysense baby monitor as a solid budget pick. For $75, it comes equipped with a 2.4-inch HD LCD color screen, secure interference-free connection and 2.4 GHz digital wireless transmission, two-way intercom, digital zoom, infrared night vision, room-temperature monitoring, and more.
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