However, when it came to actually functionality, the DXR-8 was by far the BETTER choice. The on-screen touch controls of the Samsung lagged and were difficult to use. The Samsung’s touch screen is far different than the touch screen on their cell phones, their touch screen has little sensors throughout that you can see if you look at it closely. The Samsung also went out of range (as noted in many of the pictures) when compared to the DXR-8. In one picture I took both units outside. The DXR-8 went over 200’ from my house (and probably could have gone much further). The Samsung went out of range before I even got out the door. The Samsung unit failed at three different areas in my house. Trust me when I tell you that I didn’t make the test easy either. I had three doors shut and about four walls separating the handheld units from their cameras. I took them throughout the house, side-by-side, at the same time. Save yourself both time and $$$ and just start with the Infant Optics DXR-8. Additional pros of the DXR-8 include the on-screen temperature display of the baby’s room, and a brighter display (the Samsung display was rather disappointing, I thought it would have been the far better display, but it simply was not). The only con of the DXR-8 is the smaller screen size, but it is sufficient. Both units functioned about the same when it came to night vision.
Range of signal: Some baby monitors have better range than others. If you live in a big house with multiple rooms, range will be a key consideration for you. Anyone who lives in a single-story house or a smaller apartment may not need as much range. Many baby monitors have an alert when you get out of range, and the packaging typically gives you an estimate of the range. Bear in mind that range varies widely from home to home. The construction of the walls between you and the baby monitor may even limit the range.
We were also disappointed that the Angelcare’s parent unit lacks an out-of-range warning. If you’re in the backyard or basement and the monitor disconnects, it’s not clear whether you’re looking at a napping baby or a frozen screen. Still, it beat out the Baby Delight for sound and video quality and offers a few customizable features: You can adjust the volume on the baby unit as well as the parent unit, and set up timed alarms and temperature alerts.
The best baby monitor apps allow you to monitor baby using only your existing devices, like phones, tablets or even computers. One device acts a transmitter in baby’s room, and you use another device to monitor baby. Some apps only have audio functionality, but others have both audio and video. As a plus, the best baby monitor apps often have cool features that traditional baby monitors don’t have, like remote capabilities. However, some users complain that they can be somewhat unreliable.

I would definitely recommend this monitor to other mums. I absolutely love the two-way function on the BT Audio Baby Monitor 450 – if my little boy wakes up I can talk to him and settle him without having to go into his room. This is a great timesaver and is something my original baby monitor didn’t have. I also love the design of the BT Audio Baby Monitor 450; it’s very stylish and would look good in any nursery.
Despite the 4.4 stars out of 5 the DXR-8 receives (based on well over 200 reviews) from Amazon customers, some users report that the monitor conflicts with other devices on the 2 GHz wavelength, viz, the monitor drops the wireless signal from the camera. Others grouse that while up to four cameras can be connected to one monitor, only one camera can be paired to one monitor, viz, only one monitor can be used. This means, similarly to the Foscam FBM 3501 mentioned previously, a parent can only monitor one child in one room with the DXR-8 and not multiple rooms simultaneously. Also, the   DXR-8 does not have internet streaming capability to one’s smartphone or tablet — a glaring omission considering the product’s hefty price tag.

This cover is great! It is very thin and is of high quality. The cover folds back for reading and still remains very thin. My previous cover was an Amazon leather Kindle cover. Over time, the leather stretched from the cover having been turned back for reading. This caused the cover not to connect properly with the magnet and the Kindle no longer turned off when I closed the cover. As a result, I don't miss having the leather at all. The material still looks nice. I chose the magenta color..so my Kindle won't easily get lost. The color looks just like it does in the Amazon photo.
* Guest Accounts: need to allow guest accounts for grandparents, but absolutely need the ability to turn OFF the microphone for those accounts. The camera is only in the baby's room, but the microphone extends as far as sound travels, and you probably don't want your mother-in-law listening to every discussion in your home. This is a HUGE security feature that is a requirement for anything with guest accounts
The BT Video Baby Monitor 5000 is a high quality video baby monitor on a 2.8 Inch screen and will give you peace of mind that your baby is resting or sleeping peacefully. With remote control pan and tilt you can set/adjust your monitor remotely so you can keep an eye on baby at your preferred view and never miss a moment. With the portable parent unit and 250 m range you can always keep an eye on your bundle of joy while you are moving around your home. The two way talk back feature allows you to reassure your baby that you are always there for them whilst you are busy or on the move, a useful tool to calm your baby remotely or when you are on your way to them. Also keep an eye on your baby when the lights are down with the night vision feature. There is also a choice of five lullabies to help calm, soothe and relax your loved one. Comes with 1 year manufacturer's warranty

The Nanit baby monitor has some of the same features as an Arlo, plus an app that offers more analysis of your baby’s sleep and development, in addition to the basic video feed. However, it costs more than the Arlo, lacks the robust support and security of the Arlo app, and shares the same issues with connectivity that plague all of the other Wi-Fi–enabled monitors we’ve seen.
Last, a few features are simply not that useful, but they’re more like unnecessary clutter than legitimate flaws. The talk-back feature can be difficult to understand on the baby end of the line (we found that it works best—that is, intelligibly—if you speak about a foot away from the microphone, and avoid shouting). A “shortcut” button to control the monitor’s volume and brightness doesn’t really save you much time. There are other features on the menu—with the little songs, a timer, and a zoom, you have a total of about seven. But honestly, after testing this monitor for some time and others for years longer, the only thing you really need to be able to do regularly is adjust the volume.
If your internet goes down, your baby monitor goes down. A wifi baby monitor uses your home's internet connection to communicate to servers, then to your app. So if your internet connection goes down, then you will no longer be able to stream video of your baby. That's a huge consideration to keep in mind because you never know when your internet will slow down or simply stop working for several minutes or hours, and you will be stuck without a working baby monitor. There are a few wifi baby monitors that will still communicate locally (within your home's network) when the internet goes down, such as the Lollipop or Nanit. They do this by switching from internet to local area network when an outage is detected, so you can have confidence that if you're connected to your home wifi you'll still see your baby.

Withings features a high-quality 3-MP video sensor that gives clear and unfettered footage of the baby. With special features such as high-resolution digital video, image stabilization, a wide-angle lens, zoom capabilities, and more, you can position the camera in the nursery and not have to worry about constantly repositioning it. In addition to working on Wi-Fi and 3G/4G networks, Withings offers bonus features like a two-way speaker, infrared lighting, the ability to remotely turn on lullabies through the camera itself, motion detection, and room temperature and humidity monitoring. All of this monitoring is done through the complementary Withings apps for iOS and Android.


A good WiFi monitor is convenient and feature-rich — or else we may as well stick with the HelloBaby. The iBaby takes both aspect to the next level. It was the fastest WiFi model to set up at only five minutes. Once you download the app, a straightforward tutorial walks you through every feature. We liked that you can choose both sensitivity levels and notification options for noise, motion, temperature, and humidity — meaning the iBaby won’t alert you to those quiet falling-asleep sounds, or small movements unless you want it to.
Eufy, a company known for its robot vacuum cleaners, is branching into baby monitors with the new $135 Security SpaceView monitor. The monitor comes with a handheld display featuring a 5-inch LCD screen and enough battery power to let you check in on the nursery throughout the day. We're waiting to get our hands on the Security SpaceView camera, but with 330-degree tilt and 110-degree pan, it sounds like there's little that will escape the 702p camera's view. Other features include night vision, noise alerts and two-way talk. Stand by for a full review.
In addition to the standard parent and baby unit, these monitors include a device that tracks your baby’s movements, breathing, or heart rate, and offer time-sensitive alarms that alert you if your baby hasn’t moved in the last 20–30 seconds. While they aren’t proven to reduce SIDS, many new parents told us these monitors gave them added peace of mind.
But although the Arlo can be really impressive, it can also be annoying. Leaving aside that surprisingly impressive night-light, we found in testing that we weren’t using most of those extra features beyond trying them out for novelty’s sake. The Arlo is clearly the way to go if you want to access your camera while away from home. But baby monitors are far more commonly used in our own homes, often by our beds, running all night, with the video off and the audio on, and we peek in if there’s a sign of trouble. That’s about it.

Project Nursery offers a variety of monitor options that include fantastic features like remote camera control, two-way communication, motion, sound and temperature alerts and the ability to play white noise or lullabies. But what we like best about this one is that it comes with a traditional 5-inch screen monitor and a 1.5-inch mini video monitor that you can wear like a bracelet. Both monitors have a long battery life, too.
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