If you’re looking to spend under $100 on a video monitor, Baldwin recommends the Babysense baby monitor as a solid budget pick. For $75, it comes equipped with a 2.4-inch HD LCD color screen, secure interference-free connection and 2.4 GHz digital wireless transmission, two-way intercom, digital zoom, infrared night vision, room-temperature monitoring, and more.
It depends on how you want to use it. If it’s important to you that you can see your baby when you’re away from home, the app connectivity would be a must. However, if you’re simply looking for a baby monitor for domestic use, I can’t see the benefit of using an app to watch your baby or control the camera when you can do that from the 6000’s parent unit.
The MoonyBaby Monitor has a large 4.3-inch display, but we dismissed it because the camera can’t pan or tilt throughout the room. The company does offer a model with a pan/tilt function, but with only two reviews so far (and only 36 on the more popular fixed-camera option, as of September 2018) we can’t recommend either without a longer record of reliability.
Like most Wi-Fi–enabled monitors, the Arlo Baby offers several capabilities you won’t get with a simpler RF video monitor like our pick. You can access the camera remotely via your smartphone (or computer), you don’t need to worry about finding and charging a dedicated monitor, the video quality is far superior, and you can even store video online if you want. The Arlo is part of a robust, reliable security camera network, with more consistent app support and customer service than its Wi-Fi monitor peers. If you already use and love Arlo products, this could be a logical addition to your home-monitoring setup. Yet when you get down to actually using the product in the usual circumstances—at night, in the background, mostly on audio, with the occasional video check-in—you’re not really thinking about all of those features. That’s because you’re too busy trying to reestablish the connection and remain logged in! At times, relying on the Arlo means accepting a level of inconvenience our relatively simple RF video pick never puts you through.
Looking at other Wi-Fi–enabled models, we don’t recommend getting the Ezviz Mini, the Palermo Wi-Fi Video Baby Monitor, or the LeFun C2, all of which Amazon reviewers report have connectivity issues, among other problems. We dismissed another Wi-Fi monitor we tested—the Evoz Glow Baby Monitor—for being harder to set up than the iBaby monitor, our former recommendation, and for not being notably better than the iBaby in any other way.
We bought ours two and a half years ago. From the beginning the light went out at 21-22 *C,but worked as expected both warmer and colder than this. It took ages to work out why it sometimes wasn't on. This was a pain when trying to use it as a night light. But the music is good, I like the temperature warning, the range is good, the travel bag is handy. The light began to work intermittently after 2 years and then the digital display went. It's now unusable.

The monitor has really clear sound quality, allowing me to hear my baby as soon as he stirs and get to him quicker. It has also made the bedtime routine much easier as I can play a lullaby and put the lightshow on to soothe my baby to sleep. The monitor reaches all over the house, so I have the peace of mind that wherever I go, I’ll still hear my baby if he wakes up.


If you’re looking to spend under $100 on a video monitor, Baldwin recommends the Babysense baby monitor as a solid budget pick. For $75, it comes equipped with a 2.4-inch HD LCD color screen, secure interference-free connection and 2.4 GHz digital wireless transmission, two-way intercom, digital zoom, infrared night vision, room-temperature monitoring, and more.
I was either going to buy a Pi or Arduino, and Pi won the contest. The Raspberry pi stood out because it supports the ability to be a low power computer. Needless to say it's comparing a micro-controller development board with a fully capable computer. Add a Samsung Pro SDHC card and it's ready to go. I currently use mine to run XBMC for Pi; streaming videos from my NAS, Pandora Radio, and all the "freebee" add-ons available for multimedia. It runs 1080p movies just fine with some fine tweaking of the multipliers. HDMI is great, because I don't need a separate audio connection. I can even control my Pi with my Samsung's TV remote, because XBMC supports the HDMI-CEC. The included clear case is great because it protects my Pi, and all of the LED indicators line up perfectly when everything is snapped into place. The adapter is
The interface on the monitor, aka the parent unit, is basic, simple, and intuitive, while many of its competitors have awkward controls. When panning and tilting the camera, for example, the Infant Optics responds immediately and can move in very small increments. The text on the menu displays look like something off of an old Motorola RAZR, but the commands are easy to interpret and less confusing than those of some competitors. A group of four buttons makes it easy to pull up the menu and make a change (to the volume, say) without losing sight of the image on the screen. Other nice minor touches, like a display that constantly notes the temperature in the baby’s room, appear on this model but not on all of its competitors. This is not a touchscreen, but frankly, if you’ve ever used an iPhone, you’ll find the touchscreens on most baby monitors to be sorely substandard.
Generally good but the volume is quite low even at max and it can be quite hard to hear the baby - this is a bit annoying particularly when the screen turns off to save power as the microphone doesn’t seem to pick up all baby’s noises and we end up switching the screen on just to check everything is ok. Our old BT monitor which did not have a video seemed to be much louder.
Project Nursery offers a variety of monitor options that include fantastic features like remote camera control, two-way communication, motion, sound and temperature alerts and the ability to play white noise or lullabies. But what we like best about this one is that it comes with a traditional 5-inch screen monitor and a 1.5-inch mini video monitor that you can wear like a bracelet. Both monitors have a long battery life, too.
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