During our tests, we found ourselves among the fraction of buyers having problems with the display on the DXR-8. Our first test unit worked fine out of the box, but after a couple of hours running on battery, the display became distorted and nothing would fix it. Likewise, you’ll find a few complaints on Amazon of owners experiencing dead pixels after about a year of use (here’s one and here’s another). The good news: Those folks reported that Infant Optics replaced their monitors (as they did ours) even though some were out of warranty. In fact, the company consistently receives decent feedback on customer service.
Our testers preferred the Baby Delight’s parent unit — its buttons were more responsive than Angelcare and it was easier to set up. This movement monitor uses a cordless magnetic sensor instead of a pad. Because the sensor is clipped onto your baby’s onesie, right next to their chest, the alarm won’t go off if you forget to disarm it before a middle-of-the-night feeding.
Its parent display unit is the smallest we tested, with a screen only 2.4 inches wide, but the video quality was among the best. By comparison, Infant Optics’ bigger screen didn’t offer a better picture, and our Motorola model had an obvious two-second delay — even when we took it off WiFi and used its direct signal mode to rule out connectivity issues. The differences are slight, but we were impressed that the HelloBaby could keep up with monitors twice its price.
The system’s viewing screen has a row of LEDs, which allow you to see the sound of your baby’s voice, and alerts you if he or she is crying. The system has two-way talk, so if you want to calm your baby down, you can speak into the intercom push-to-talk button. Plus, the screen has a remote in-room temperature display, so you can always see if your baby is comfortable and safe.
Quite alot of extras on it, & the sound is crystal clear, but after less than a year I encountered the same problem as another review stated - the parent untit switches off half way through the night, despite being on mains charge! I'm going to try changing the rechargeable batteries to see if that helps.Has anyone else had this problem I wonder? When switching the parent unit off it makes a loud 'beep, beep, beep' noise! Fine, unless your other half is sleeping, so I end up stuffing the unit under my pillow to switch it off! The night light is useful, as is the torch on the parent unit. The temperature is displayed which can be handy too. You have to press & hold both units to turn them on - I'm sure on the parent unit, it's taking longer & longer of pressing before it switches on! If you are happy with a fancy unit, then this is worth a try, but do note comments above. A simpler unit may have less to break & therefore may last longer perhaps!
The price of the Infant Optics, about $150 at the time of writing, is on the higher end for baby monitors. As much as we wanted to recommend a more affordable video monitor, we found their shortcomings to be major enough—terrible video quality and poor connections were common—that we couldn’t recommend one. The Infant Optics offers a better value even though it’s among the more expensive options available. Many people use these daily for years, which helps justify the investment, and the reports of reliable customer service from other owners are reassuring. If you have to spend less, go audio-only.
We have had two of these, so far! First one stopped working after 6 months. The second stopped working after about 18 months. Initially the digital display started deteriorating. You couldn't read the temp etc until it got to the point that there were just random black marks; totally useless. Eventually it just stopped working and wouldn't switch on. Only saving grace is that sound is pretty good. Between the first and the second one we had a Motorola one and that lasted 4 days before it was returned as we couldn't hear a thing. Not sure whether we'll buy the same one again? If you're happy to consider replacing your baby monitor perhaps even more than once, then this is for you! Surely there must be decent reliable monitors available that not only have good sound but will actually last a few years??
From a pure imaging standpoint, night vision is vital for watching your baby sleep from another room, and is standard for most baby monitors. Motorized pan and tilt (which lets you swivel the camera from afar) isn't quite as common, but is very welcome if you have a toddler and want to scan an entire room. High-definition is a nice plus, but you don't need the highest-resolution sensor to keep tabs on your baby—most of the monitors we test use 720p cameras rather than 1080p.
The Nanit couldn’t be more perfect for analytical types. The camera—when placed just so—uses computer vision to watch your baby’s every move, and then tell you what it means. You get a notice on your phone, which acts like a handheld monitor, when your child is awake, acting fussy or has fallen asleep. The Nanit also assigns a sleep score to each night based on how many hours your child was actually crashed out. Other stats include how many times you went into your child’s room and how long it took for your little one to fall asleep. Because the Nanit streams live video and audio to your phone, you can also check in on your kiddo when you’re away from home. It also has a nightlight and temperature and humidity sensors.
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