Still need help? We understand! There’s a lot to choose from, and given that the baby monitor performs a super important job, we want to help you select the one that provides the ultimate peace of mind when it comes to baby’s safety and security. We’ve rounded up 10 of the best baby monitors on the market, from high-end, do-it-all monitors to affordable but effective audio monitors and everything in between. You’re sure to find your digital nap companion on our list!
A WiFi monitor gets rid of the parent unit entirely and replaces it with a smartphone app. That app connects to the baby unit over the internet, rather than standard radio frequencies. As a result, you’ll never have to worry about being out of range from your camera. If you’re at dinner and want to check in on the babysitter, you’re still connected. Since it operates from an app, it’s also easier to flip through features than trying to figure out a finicky, low-quality touchscreen, or a dozen different buttons.

(WEEE) Directive (2002/96/EC) has been put in place Declaration of Conformance to recycle products using best available recovery and Hereby, Vtech declares that this BT Baby Monitor 150 recycling techniques to minimize the impact on the is in compliance with the essential requirements and environment, treat any hazardous substances and other relevant provisions of Directive 1999/5/EC.


Lullabies: Monitors often include a selection of soothing sounds to help your baby drift off to slumberland. These can be traditional nursery rhymes of the rock-a-bye-baby variety, nature sounds, white noise, or some combination of all of them. It’s a good idea to check them out before you play them to your sleeping child to determine whether they might help or hinder their sleep.


Technology has changed the way parents monitor their babies. With today’s audio and video, parents can keep an ear peeled and an eye out for the most subtle changes in their little ones. Whether you want to simply hear your baby’s first cry or you’re looking for a high-tech video monitor with a sleep sensor, there’s a baby monitor out there for you.

When shopping for baby monitor, try to choose a product that offers both quality and security. For best results, opt for a model that offers both audio and video capabilities. You should be able to see and hear your baby in real time and also talk back to them as needed. Baby monitors can vary dramatically in quality, but today's models offer stunning HD video that ensures you can see your baby's surroundings with crystal clarity. Purchase the best quality you can afford, and enjoy the peace of mind that comes from knowing that your baby is closely within reach.
The more old fashioned video monitors are better if your internet isn't reliable because they use a dedicated video monitor instead. You can also choose to pair high-tech Wi-Fi security cameras with cheaper audio-only baby monitors to have the best of both worlds. We've tested a few baby monitors and researched the rest to find the best ones you can buy no matter your preference.
This year alone we have seen over 30 new baby monitors enter the market, most of which are low-quality products being mass produced in China. They are cheap and might even work well for a few weeks or months, but give them a little more time and they will start to have all sorts of issues. We've seen way too many melting chargers, malfunctioning screens, and units that are completely dead after a few months. Don't waste your money! Here's some of the factors we consider in our testing:
I would definitely choose this above other baby monitors on the market – it’s affordable, packed with great features and surpasses other, more expensive products on the market. For me, it beats the other products with video and movement sensors – all you really need is a good quality monitor that allows you to hear your baby. If this doesn’t win, the competitors must have an in-built babysitter mode!
Range: Range is the main drawback of an RF model, as audio monitors can roam farther out, and a Wi-Fi connection can theoretically be checked anywhere. We wanted an adequate range for a typical home—to be able to maintain a signal up or down a flight of stairs, across the house, and out on a patio or driveway, but we didn’t expect much beyond that. We zeroed in on monitors rated to about 700 feet of range or greater.1

Receiving 4.1 out of 5 stars (and well over 500 5 star reviews) based on about 900 reviews from Amazon customers, the Dropcam Pro is lauded for its “very good video quality,” premium material assembly, quick and easy setup/commissioning and a field of view (130° diagonal) wider than most of its competitors. It also has PTZ (pan/tilt/zoom) camera and two-way talkback. Note that this product does not come with a separate, dedicated monitor; it uses mobile and web apps capability for PCDs such as smartphones, tablets and other computing devices. The Dropcam Pro supports dual band Wi-Fi (the standard 2.4 GHz and 5GHz) for improved wireless connectivity.


We have had two of these, so far! First one stopped working after 6 months. The second stopped working after about 18 months. Initially the digital display started deteriorating. You couldn't read the temp etc until it got to the point that there were just random black marks; totally useless. Eventually it just stopped working and wouldn't switch on. Only saving grace is that sound is pretty good. Between the first and the second one we had a Motorola one and that lasted 4 days before it was returned as we couldn't hear a thing. Not sure whether we'll buy the same one again? If you're happy to consider replacing your baby monitor perhaps even more than once, then this is for you! Surely there must be decent reliable monitors available that not only have good sound but will actually last a few years??
- the button placement makes it easy to accidentally switch on the annoying music (why would you want this feature on a baby monitor???) that the camera can pipe (loudly) out in the baby's room. You know where this is going - the stupid music that you didn't want in the first place turns on and wakes up the baby you just spent an hour trying to put down. FML.

If you aren't interested in having a video baby monitor, the VTech DM221 is the very best audio-only monitor you can buy. You can listen in on your baby or get vibration and light-based alerts when the monitor is in silent mode. The five LED lights indicate the level of sound so you can tell whether your baby is cooing quietly or shrieking for mom and dad.


The iBaby M6S was a former recommendation for a Wi-Fi–enabled monitor, but it falls short compared with the Arlo. It shares a few positive aspects—access from your phone anywhere, no need to worry about keeping track of a separate dedicated monitor, and the ability to record the camera’s footage. However, as we noted in long-term tests (and confirmed in the iBaby’s negative reviews), the app is pretty poorly done, and lost connections are a persistent problem.
These BT monitors were bought for our children as they were born 13 months apart and this was the only multi-cam system we could find on the market to meet our needs. The cameras are complete with adaptor leads and one wall mount bracket. They are in very good condition. The monitor has a couple of scratches on the screen from regular usage but they don’t affect the picture. The battery life is only a couple of hours but can be used off the adaptor plug. Please contact me if you have any questions.
Summer Infant has been making high-quality, reliable baby monitors for many years. One problem with the Summer Infant monitors is that it's difficult to figure out which one has the features and quality you want, given the very wide range of options. Some are much better than others, and this is definitely one of the better ones we've tested. This color baby monitor has a high-quality 5" high resolution LCD display, which is a similar quality to the Project Nursery monitor in terms of color, contrast, and brightness. When we first got our hands on this, we were excited that maybe it was a nice wide angle panorama camera. But it turns out what they meant by "panorama" is that you can remotely tilt, pan, and zoom. The panning does go nice and wide, allowing you to swing the camera side to side about 180-degrees. But the camera angle itself is no different than the other monitors on this list. That being said, this is a great baby monitor with some great features. In addition to being able to remotely pan, tilt, and zoom the camera, some of the best features were: 1) a subtle night light that you can turn on/off remotely, and can choose it to glow with a soft blue or red color, 2) a sensor that tells you the temperature of your baby's room at all times, 3) a sound-activated light bar on the top of the receiver that tells you when there's noise in the room (even when volume is off). We thought the big hand-held unit was great, with a convenient kick-stand to put it anywhere in the house, great battery life, and good range. We were able to walk around in the backyard with this unit and still get a good, stable image. Note that you can add an extra camera to this, and it will cycle through the two cameras automatically (it does not do split-screen to see both at once). Downfalls? Well, the night vision isn't quite as good as with higher-ranked monitors on this list, and even the lowest volume level seemed really loud for sleeping parents. Also, even though the screen is nice and big, the digital video quality is sub-par relative to several other options on this list. Overall, this is a great addition to our best baby monitor list, as it has great features and falls in the middle of the price range. For about the same price, we'd go with the Infant Optics or Samsung option, unless you value the larger screen size.

Keep an eye (and ear) on baby with an audio, visual or movement detecting monitor. Choose from products that feature compact cameras, infrared night vision and high-sensitivity microphones - to alert you to a variety of sounds, no matter how small. Some models are designed for travel or the car, while others come with integrated lullabies to help soothe your child back to sleep.
Range: Range is the main drawback of an RF model, as audio monitors can roam farther out, and a Wi-Fi connection can theoretically be checked anywhere. We wanted an adequate range for a typical home—to be able to maintain a signal up or down a flight of stairs, across the house, and out on a patio or driveway, but we didn’t expect much beyond that. We zeroed in on monitors rated to about 700 feet of range or greater.1

Some baby cams can work at night with low light levels. Most video baby monitors today have a night vision feature. Infrared LEDs attached on the front of the camera allow a user to see the baby in a dark room. Video baby monitors that have night vision mode will switch to this mode automatically in the dark. Some advanced baby cams now work over Wi-Fi so parents can watch babies through their smartphone or computer.
With the VTech VM342-2 Camera Video Monitor's 170-degree wide-angle lens, parents can use multiple viewing options to get a panoramic view of their baby's nursery. This high-resolution LCD monitor also has automatic infrared night vision to check on babies without waking them. Plus, it has four calming sounds and five lullabies to help babies get to sleep on their own.
We just received this a few days ago. It's so tiny I didn't know what to think of it at first, but I love how small it is because it'll take up very little room on the wall. We are still waiting for the monitor and furniture for the nursery, so we haven't tried it yet. However, we were pleasantly surprised that they sent us a corner too, for free! How cool is that?

Despite ranking among Amazon’s top-selling baby monitors, the Motorola MBP36S and MBP33S, which are listed on the same page, have as many negative reviews as positive ones. Many reviewers complain about poor battery life and deficient quality and durability. BabyGearLab also gave these monitors a low rating, citing the “disappointing images and sound on a hard to use parental unit.”


Long Range: Monitors that don’t connect to WiFi have a limited range, usually around 600 to 1,000 feet. While this is large enough for all but the biggest houses, we asked our testers to find out how far they could wander away — and how many walls they could put between them and the baby unit — before they went out of range, as well as to report back on what happened when they did. Sometimes there was an alarm or a notification, but other times the screen simply froze.

Reliability. This is a tough one, as it requires long-term knowledge of system reliability, through thick and thin. There are many baby monitors on the market that start out excellent but tend to glitch out or completely fail within the first several months of ownership. This is especially the case for many unrecognized brand names that are saturating the market. If you're buying this as a baby registry gift the last thing you want to do is make the new parents think you cheaped out on a junky baby monitor! All of the best video monitors that make it onto our list have withstood the test of time, lasting at least 6 months, and in some cases several years at this point (like the Infant Optics option!). Another point about reliability that's worth mentioning is that most modern wifi baby monitors will keep a local connection to your app even when the internet is down. So as long as you're still in your house, you can continue streaming video even when the internet is down.
A word of caution about extremely cheap baby video monitors (we're talking devices that cost less than $50): they're not known for their security and can be hacked. Be sure to always change the default password of any connected device you purchase. You can also protect yourself by sticking to known vendors who post frequent firmware updates and have easy-to-reach customer support.
This is a criticism of the Amazon page more than of the product. It seems that most (all?) of the reviews are labeled as being for the various Pi 2 kits, but are in fact for earlier versions of the kits (Pi B and Pi B+) which had different kit components. The Base kit used to contain a case apparently so there are reviews labeled "Basic Pi 2 Kit" discussing the case and I was expecting a case when the Basic kit arrived.
So happy I found this monitor! I previously had a more high tech video monitor from another company that had a ton of features, but malfunctioned on me within a month. I replaced it with the same one thinking it was a one off, but sure enough it started acting funny within a couple weeks. This monitor has been great I'm amazed at the battery life and range it has. My only complaint is that the power adapter cord for the camera needs to be a lot longer to have more options of hanging it on a wall while keeping it a distance from babies reach.
The most troubling pattern you see in the one-star Amazon reviews is the reports of battery life declining (or failing) over time. This is part of a larger trend in baby monitors in general, and our take on it is that the battery tech within these monitors is just not at the level people have come to expect after living with good phones and tablets and other quality electronics. Reading the negative reviews for this and many other monitors reminded us of the kinds of problems people had with rechargeable batteries years ago. Here’s a good example of what we mean. So for now, for any baby monitor, set your expectations accordingly.
Though we feel that the image quality on the Infant Optics is adequate, it’s hardly impressive by current (or even recent) standards. You can capably check to see if your kid is in bed and sleeping soundly, but you’re not going to see a little trail of drool trickling out of their mouth. If you want a crisper, clearer image, your best option is our Wi-Fi–enabled also-great pick, the Arlo Baby, a model we feel has a few shortcomings that put the Infant Optics above it in spite of our pick’s weaker image quality.
The 8 kinds of alarms, pre stores lullabies, pan and tilt feature, temperature control system, capacity of monitor being hooked up to 4 cameras are few of the astounding qualities of one of the best and cheap baby monitors with camera available in the market. The night vision is impressively clear and noise free for you to have a sound sleep during the night. The LED lights have sensors which adapt to the light in the room to project grain-less picture of your dear one. Even if you are busy with your chores and have hooked up head phones or are a person with hearing disability, do not worry; the LED lights blink on the parent unit to alert you whenever your child needs you.
I came across an interesting analysis on the matter on ArsTechnica. There's a reason California's governor took time to sign the bill. It's likely constitutionally airtight, courtesy of the direct actions of the FCC. You see, the internet service providers didn't know they had it good until Mr.Pai stated that the FCC didn't have the legal ability to regulate the internet. Since the FCC has now abdicated all responsibility in the matter, that now puts it at the discretion of the state to implement (a state right), and now they (the ISPs) will get fifty sets of laws from fifty different states, each different, with California’s resurrected 2015 federal law being the toughest. Sometimes, you shoot yourself in the leg.
Poor quality and durability plague many baby monitors. Scores of reviewers on Amazon and other sites report that the Hello Baby HB32; Motorola MPB854Connect, MBP36XL, MBP33XL, MBP41, and MBP843Connect; Infant Optics DXR-5; Summer Infant Dual View, In View 2.0, and Sure Sight 2.0; Levana Jena, Ayden, and Astra; Angelcare AC420; Philips Avent SCD570 and SCD630/SCD637; and VTech VM342-2 and VM343 don’t deliver on promised functionality and start to fail in some critical capacity within a year—often in much less time.
-Night Vision:Two mode selection - 940nm LEDs invisible for nearing baby, 850nm LED for wall mounting. -Remote Music Playing:lullabies built-in. -Push to Talk:Live View Sharing - unlimited shared users. -Support Computer/ Mobile Phone / Tablet- Can Be used in Android 4.0 & IOS 7& Windows& iPad System. -Option- Lollipop Sensor :Temperature / Humidity / Air Quality. -Support local Storage UP to 128 GB(the SD Card not include)or Cloud Storage. -Unique Audio Mode Feature: The Only WiFiCam with Audio Mode for Overnight Monitor, Alarm while Network disconnect. -Audio Mode:Make you sleep better at night. -REAL Crying Detection:We do NOT detect decibels, Lollipop detects CRYING and NOISE. -Push Video Notification: Clear image and video day or night / Free latest video stor.

However, detractors note that the FBM3501 has no scan feature that automatically cycles to another camera every 10 to 15 seconds. Hence the Foscam monitor lacks a key feature essential to an expandable monitor system. To use the multi-camera monitoring system, one must choose the camera manually. This of course causes issues when remotely supervising more than one child in multiple rooms at the same time. Also, this monitor does not have smartphone capability.
We tested monitors daily over a period of several months, in three houses: one nearly 100 years old with plaster walls, a newer home with standard drywall construction, and a two-level 1960s home with a driveway on another level from the kids’ rooms. We tried the Wi-Fi–enabled monitors with two routers, in separate test locations, to be sure that any connection issues were with the monitors themselves and not the Internet connection.
I purchased this monitor to use in our chicken coop to watch over the baby chicks and before continuing I would like to say, I'm very particular on quality on everything I purchase and I can truthfully say that this review is my honest opinion. After unpacking and taking a good look I find the monitor and camera to be excellent quality and workmanship. After charging the monitor and powered up the camera and monitor I had instant video, these also have audio and you can talk back in fourth, you can adjust the monitor lighter or darker and it has music you can turn on and off. The monitor runs 8 hours on a full charge allowing you to carry it with you. Our chicks haven't hatch yet and I can't wait to watch them and keep tabs on there heat lamps. I recommend this monitor.
The Video Baby Monitor 6000 is BT’s most expensive video baby monitor, and replaces the brand’s Video Monitor 7500 Lightshow model. Although it features an increased screen size of 5 inches (up from 3.5 inches), it no longer boasts a light show and 19-strong selection of lullabies along with nature sounds, womb sounds and white noise. In this respect it isn’t much different from the cheaper models, the 3000 and the 5000, apart from the larger display.
Watch your little one fall asleep on our high quality 2.8” video baby monitor screen. You’ll never miss a moment with the remote control pan and tilt function so you can change the angle of the camera from the comfort of your sofa. And with night vision you can still keep an eye on your little one even when the lights are down. Rest at ease with our temperature display feature, which will alert you if your babies room is too hot or cold. With five lullaby’s to choose from sooth your little one to asleep. And when you’re not in the room the two way communication talk back feature keeps your baby and you connected.
Just because you’re pulling double diaper duty doesn’t mean you need to buy two baby monitors. If you’re a twin mom, simply look for a monitor that can accommodate add-on cameras. The Babysense Video Monitor comes with two digital cameras right out of the box (and can handle up to four), making this the best baby monitor for twins. With the push of a button, you can toggle between views of your twin babes. Plus, this monitor features digital pan/tilt and zoom, two-way communication, room temperature monitoring and a 900-foot range.
The operating range of the parent unit is up to 1,000 feet outdoors or 150 feet indoors (to compensate for walls). The parent unit can be set to beep if the link between it and the baby unit is lost, or its rechargeable battery is low. If you don’t want to always concentrate on listening, the system features a vibrating sound alert that detects audio. Most Amazon.com reviewers have raved about the product for its simplicity, while others have found reliability problems with the rechargeable batteries.
With the VTech VM342-2 Camera Video Monitor's 170-degree wide-angle lens, parents can use multiple viewing options to get a panoramic view of their baby's nursery. This high-resolution LCD monitor also has automatic infrared night vision to check on babies without waking them. Plus, it has four calming sounds and five lullabies to help babies get to sleep on their own.
This is the baby monitor that everybody wants to love, with its unique and cute style, its wifi capability, and its huge list of awesome features. The iBaby M7 is the newest addition to the iBaby Care line of wifi baby monitors, released in 2018 and slowly gaining traction and popularity among discerning parents. It builds upon the popular M6S baby monitor by adding a few features, including support for both 2.4GHz and 5.0GHz wifi signals (dual band), a moonlight soother projection system, air quality sensor, and diaper and feeding time alerts. When we setup the camera and installed the app on our Andoid device (also compatible with Apple iOS), we first had some difficulty getting the camera to connect. It turns out that our camera was too far from our wireless router - the manufacturer recommends that the camera is within about 15-25 feet of the router or it will have a poor connection. As a little hint, there is a black reset button on the back of the camera, and if you hold it down for about 45 seconds you'll hear a little jingle and that will reset it. We needed to use that trick to get it working. Once we got it working, it was easy to add the iBaby camera to the app and we were off to the races. And we were impressed with all the features. You could play lullabies, music, white noise, and even bedtime stories like Mother Goose (though the Jack be Nimble option wasn't so calming for bedtime!); you can even add your own music to the options, which is a really cool capability. Up on top of the camera is a little projector that will beam the "moonlight soother" projection onto the ceiling; it can be still, rotating, or off completely. Another hint is that the "help" button on the camera unit will actually turn the projector on or off when you don't have your mobile device. Additional features include motion alerts, temperature and air quality alerts, and diaper and feeding alerts (which once we set up, were actually pretty useful rather than having them on a different app). Speaking of the app, we actually liked it quite a bit - it was intuitive, reliable, and easy to use. Multiple users can access it simultaneously from different devices (use the "Invite & View Users" option), and the same app can be used to cycle between different iBaby cameras you have set up around the house (even the older M6 model can also be added). We thought the video quality was very good, it uses high definition and its night vision was clearer than many of the other options on this list. You can have your device's screen off and the app will prompt an alert when there is noise or movement, so you don't need to keep your phone's screen on all night. The app also lets you save photos and videos to your device, and you can be confident with its security because it's streaming encrypted to the state-of-the-art Amazon AWS servers. So we said it's the baby monitor everyone wants to love, and it should be clear why - the features are truly remarkable, especially for a wifi baby monitor that is only about $170. The only major downfall of this wifi camera system is the connectivity: you need to have it very close to your home's router for it to get a good connection, and it can be finicky with connectivity at times. Once it's connected, we were really happy with it, but it did intermittently disconnect at times which was definitely frustrating. So overall, this is a feature-rich wifi baby monitor that has some great things going for it, and is worthy of this spot on our list. Once they get the connectivity issues fully resolved, this will definitely creep up higher on our list. Interested? You can check out the iBaby Care M7 Baby Monitor here. 
Aimee is a pediatric occupational therapist practicing in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric out-patient at Central Pennsylvania Rehab Services at the Heart of Lancaster Hospital. She has been working in pediatrics for 18 years and is also the owner/operator of Aimee’s Babies LLC, a child development company. Aimee has published 3 DVDs and 9 apps which have been featured on the Rachael Ray Show and iPhone Essentials Magazine. Also certified in newborn massage and instructing yoga to children with special needs, Aimee Ketchum lives in Lititz, PA with her husband and two daughters.
These BT monitors were bought for our children as they were born 13 months apart and this was the only multi-cam system we could find on the market to meet our needs. The cameras are complete with adaptor leads and one wall mount bracket. They are in very good condition. The monitor has a couple of scratches on the screen from regular usage but they don’t affect the picture. The battery life is only a couple of hours but can be used off the adaptor plug. Please contact me if you have any questions.
Type: After considering the options, weighing the relative advantages, and experiencing many firsthand, we determined that our ideal monitor would be an RF (radio frequency) video monitor rather than one of the two main alternatives: a Wi-Fi (or cloud-based) model that you can check on your phone, and bare-bones audio-only speakers. We approached our research with an open mind, gave an equal chance to all three types, and ended up with a pick from each category.
The Video Baby Monitor 6000 is BT’s most expensive video baby monitor, and replaces the brand’s Video Monitor 7500 Lightshow model. Although it features an increased screen size of 5 inches (up from 3.5 inches), it no longer boasts a light show and 19-strong selection of lullabies along with nature sounds, womb sounds and white noise. In this respect it isn’t much different from the cheaper models, the 3000 and the 5000, apart from the larger display.
Here’s one situation when using this monitor may be a better idea for you: If you’re already using Arlo security cameras at home (and you have a baby—congrats!), you could buy this as a baby monitor now, then relocate it for use as a general security camera along with your other Arlo products when you’re through with monitoring your kid. Or if you’re in the market for an indoor security camera and you’re wondering how this could fit in, it’s worth considering our findings here alongside what we learned in our guide to wireless indoor home security cameras.
You won’t even have to wait to reach to your kid to sing lullabies; the instant your baby needs you, you will be available. The Wi-Fi enabled baby cameras face lot of security issues, this plug and play affordable baby cam is really easy to install and use. The expanded viewing coverage gives you footage of the entire room and can also be zoomed for minute details.
Our main concerns were getting a good camera with quality night imaging, good sound and an easily viewable monitor. We also felt we didn't want a system that sent our image feed off to some remote server where it would be stored for some period of time for whatever analytics that the company performed. The Infant Optics DXR-8 fulfilled all our wishes.
One of the primary uses of baby monitors is to allow attendants to hear when an infant wakes, while out of immediate hearing distance of the infant. Although commonly used, there is no evidence that these monitors prevent SIDS, and many doctors believe they provide a false sense of security.[1] Infants and young children can often be heard over a baby monitor in crib talk, in which they talk to themselves. This is a normal part of practising their language skills.
I would definitely recommend this product to a friend. It is easy to use, has great features and is very affordable. BT have thought of everything and I especially like the fact that you can turn the beep on or off for the crying alert when the monitor is on mute, which is something that other models are lacking. I love the lightshow and the choice of lullabies and found that the monitor was really clear all around the house and the parent unit was very portable. I also loved how clear and easy the menu was to use and that you could control features such as the lightshow and nightlight from the parent monitor, without having to go into the nursery.

Overall rating: F-. I really dislike this monitor and wish I purchased something else. Are most of my problems with the monitor the result of my own incompetence? Yes, but a solid 30% is design flaws and needless features. My competence levels highly correspond to the amount of sleep I get, and a new baby means I'm pretty incompetent. But I want a monitor that accounts for that and doesn't make it easier for me to (1) Wake up the freaking baby; or (2) make it easier for my partner to wake me up (or vice versa) when I finally have a chance.
It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
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