The iBaby’s video and audio quality were among the best in the WiFi group, but like all WiFi monitors, quality and how well it displays real-time action depends largely on your internet quality and speed. Our testers only experienced a delay of less than a second, more noticeable than HelloBaby’s, but nowhere close to Motorola’s three-second delay.
Why spend money on a baby monitor, which serves a single specific purpose, when you could use an indoor home-security camera that you can repurpose once your kid leaves the nursery? We wondered the same thing, so along with with dedicated video baby monitors, we tested a Nest Indoor Cam, currently among our top-rated wireless home security cameras.
The BT Audio Baby Monitor 450 definitely gave me everything I was looking for in a baby monitor, so I’d definitely recommend it to my friends. It is easy to use and set up the design functions and I thought the temperature monitor was a nice feature since it is one of the crucial elements to monitor in the baby’s room. Although my five-month-old baby was too young to concentrate properly on the lightshow, he did enjoy the music which helped soothe him to sleep.

The interface on the monitor, aka the parent unit, is basic, simple, and intuitive, while many of its competitors have awkward controls. When panning and tilting the camera, for example, the Infant Optics responds immediately and can move in very small increments. The text on the menu displays look like something off of an old Motorola RAZR, but the commands are easy to interpret and less confusing than those of some competitors. A group of four buttons makes it easy to pull up the menu and make a change (to the volume, say) without losing sight of the image on the screen. Other nice minor touches, like a display that constantly notes the temperature in the baby’s room, appear on this model but not on all of its competitors. This is not a touchscreen, but frankly, if you’ve ever used an iPhone, you’ll find the touchscreens on most baby monitors to be sorely substandard.
One minor but potentially annoying flaw: The “on” lights on the parent unit of the Infant Optics are a touch bright, and you may be more sensitive to them because you’re likely to have the unit within view as you sleep. They appear as greenish yellow light from the face of the unit, and a charging light, which is blue when the monitor’s fully charged. Depending on how sensitive you are to light, you may want to lay the display face-down on a nightstand or cover the status lights with tape.
Baby monitors, despite the name, are meant more for the caregiver than they are for the baby. We asked parents about which features they felt were helpful, like a long range so they could wander carefree all over the house, and reliability so they weren’t struggling to maintain a signal. Other features like being able to play lullabies, or receive temperature alerts are only as useful as you make them. And a few features, like motion monitors, can be exceptionally comforting for some, and distressing for others.
One minor distinction about the DXR-8 is that it comes with two interchangeable optical lenses (a standard lens and a zoom lens) and you can also buy a wide-angle lens. Having three different lens options is nice, but in practice we felt that the zoom on the standard lens was sufficient, and we expect most buyers would probably not bother changing the lenses frequently, if ever.
However, when it came to actually functionality, the DXR-8 was by far the BETTER choice. The on-screen touch controls of the Samsung lagged and were difficult to use. The Samsung’s touch screen is far different than the touch screen on their cell phones, their touch screen has little sensors throughout that you can see if you look at it closely. The Samsung also went out of range (as noted in many of the pictures) when compared to the DXR-8. In one picture I took both units outside. The DXR-8 went over 200’ from my house (and probably could have gone much further). The Samsung went out of range before I even got out the door. The Samsung unit failed at three different areas in my house. Trust me when I tell you that I didn’t make the test easy either. I had three doors shut and about four walls separating the handheld units from their cameras. I took them throughout the house, side-by-side, at the same time. Save yourself both time and $$$ and just start with the Infant Optics DXR-8. Additional pros of the DXR-8 include the on-screen temperature display of the baby’s room, and a brighter display (the Samsung display was rather disappointing, I thought it would have been the far better display, but it simply was not). The only con of the DXR-8 is the smaller screen size, but it is sufficient. Both units functioned about the same when it came to night vision.

If you want to be as streamlined as possible and happen to have extra Apple devices hanging around, the Bump recommends the Cloud Baby Monitor app, which turns your iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and even your laptop into a secure Wi-Fi baby monitor. Use one device in the nursery as a camera, then have high-quality live video and audio transmitted to a secondary device, or even a third or fourth. Using the “parent unit,” you can talk to your child through two-way video and audio, turn on lullabies or white noise, and adjust the night-light on the other side. The app will also alert you to any noise and motion occurring in the other room.
Most people don't have unlimited data plans for their smart phone, and are surprised to see very high data usage after just a few hours of streaming their wifi baby monitor. With HD video, you can go through a couple gigabytes of data in just a few hours, so keep that in mind. If your phone is connected to wifi that won't matter, but if you're using 3G or 4G LTE cellular service, you will definitely have slow video and tons of data usage.

The operating range of the parent unit is up to 1,000 feet outdoors or 150 feet indoors (to compensate for walls). The parent unit can be set to beep if the link between it and the baby unit is lost, or its rechargeable battery is low. If you don’t want to always concentrate on listening, the system features a vibrating sound alert that detects audio. Most Amazon.com reviewers have raved about the product for its simplicity, while others have found reliability problems with the rechargeable batteries.
Wireless systems use radio frequencies that are designated by governments for unlicensed use. For example, in North America frequencies near 49 MHz, 902 MHz or 2.4 GHz are available. While these frequencies are not assigned to powerful television or radio broadcasting transmitters, interference from other wireless devices such as cordless telephones, wireless toys, computer wireless networks, radar, Smart Power Meters and microwave ovens is possible.
The Nanit couldn’t be more perfect for analytical types. The camera—when placed just so—uses computer vision to watch your baby’s every move, and then tell you what it means. You get a notice on your phone, which acts like a handheld monitor, when your child is awake, acting fussy or has fallen asleep. The Nanit also assigns a sleep score to each night based on how many hours your child was actually crashed out. Other stats include how many times you went into your child’s room and how long it took for your little one to fall asleep. Because the Nanit streams live video and audio to your phone, you can also check in on your kiddo when you’re away from home. It also has a nightlight and temperature and humidity sensors.
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