I bought this baby monitor about a month ago. So far is okay, I don’t see much fuss about it. It works as it should, but unfortunately when there is light it goes on night vision and when the sun goes down but still some light coming in it looks in color but not to well. Another dislike about it that is TOO SENSITIVE! Once you pass by the baby with the LCD device it picks it up and makes a weird annoying beep. It has woken and scare my baby several times so I have to lower the volume that way when I put him to bed I don’t hear that weird annoying sound. For the price I would not recommend, mine as well buy something little more pricey but get something good.

The Samsung's display, at 5 inches, is among the largest and crispest you'll find on a baby monitor. However, the touchscreen response is sluggish, which makes it difficult to smoothly pan or tilt the camera. And when you pull up the menu, you lose the video and the audio output—that's a weakness compared with our pick, which continues to display video and play sound while navigating menu functions.
Our main concerns were getting a good camera with quality night imaging, good sound and an easily viewable monitor. We also felt we didn't want a system that sent our image feed off to some remote server where it would be stored for some period of time for whatever analytics that the company performed. The Infant Optics DXR-8 fulfilled all our wishes.
The main positive is the battery life and screen refresh. Our Motorola would have to be pretty much constantly be on charge, where as this will last the 5 hours we need in the evening easily and not use half the battery. And the camera refreshes well meaning you can pan and tilt easily, the Motorola was very jumpy. Also it means you have a better idea of babies movements. The refresh isn't perfect, but it's more than capable for the task at hand.
However, some customers complained that the video feed can only be viewed live unless one wants to pay between US$100 – 300 per year for the Dropcam monthly recording service. While Dropcam will send a “tiny” thumbnail to an email address when motion is detected, it has been noted that the image is so small as to be “worthless.” Others cite streaming delays on LTE (4G) and Wi-Fi, problems with talkback and a “blurry” zoom image. Related to the first complaint is an observation that video can’t be saved on one’s smartphone or computer; for a monthly fee, it can only be retained “in the cloud” on Dropcam’s web database. To their credit, Dropcam’s engineering team has acknowledged the talkback audio and camera zoom problems and have taken steps to correct the issues.
If you want to spend as little as possible without compromising on quality, this basic digital model is easy to get going and doesn’t mind being dropped. It has a better range than others we tried in this price range and the sound quality is good too, although you might struggle to hear clearly at low volumes. Don’t expect any whizzy features – you can’t talk back to your baby and there’s no warning to let you know if you’re out of signal range, for instance. There is a low-battery alarm, but you can’t recharge either unit. We’d have liked the units to be easier to tell apart, but for less than £20, this is still a very good investment.
The Infant Optics DXR-8 has a superior battery life to any of the other video monitors we tested, as well as a simpler monitor interface that's more intuitive and easier to navigate than those found on competitors. The range, image quality, price, and many other features are comparable with those of the best competitors. Other good qualities include a basic but secure RF connection, an ability to pair multiple cameras, and simple tactile buttons.
The patterns you see in most owner reviews support our findings, with various folks noting the excellent video quality, and, often, ultimately rating the product poorly because of its inability to consistently maintain a connection, problems with the app, issues with the app’s updates not working with their particular phone, or other basic connection problems.
Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.
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