I came across an interesting analysis on the matter on ArsTechnica. There's a reason California's governor took time to sign the bill. It's likely constitutionally airtight, courtesy of the direct actions of the FCC. You see, the internet service providers didn't know they had it good until Mr.Pai stated that the FCC didn't have the legal ability to regulate the internet. Since the FCC has now abdicated all responsibility in the matter, that now puts it at the discretion of the state to implement (a state right), and now they (the ISPs) will get fifty sets of laws from fifty different states, each different, with California’s resurrected 2015 federal law being the toughest. Sometimes, you shoot yourself in the leg.
- the button placement makes it easy to accidentally switch on the annoying music (why would you want this feature on a baby monitor???) that the camera can pipe (loudly) out in the baby's room. You know where this is going - the stupid music that you didn't want in the first place turns on and wakes up the baby you just spent an hour trying to put down. FML.
Despite the 4.4 stars out of 5 the DXR-8 receives (based on well over 200 reviews) from Amazon customers, some users report that the monitor conflicts with other devices on the 2 GHz wavelength, viz, the monitor drops the wireless signal from the camera. Others grouse that while up to four cameras can be connected to one monitor, only one camera can be paired to one monitor, viz, only one monitor can be used. This means, similarly to the Foscam FBM 3501 mentioned previously, a parent can only monitor one child in one room with the DXR-8 and not multiple rooms simultaneously. Also, the   DXR-8 does not have internet streaming capability to one’s smartphone or tablet — a glaring omission considering the product’s hefty price tag.
I would definitely recommend this product to friends and fellow mums. It comes in a sleek, hygienic, compact design that takes minutes to set up. The manual is very clear and there is a free phone number should you have any problems. The digital screen is clear and easy to scroll between the options. The sound quality is amazing and far superior to my current Angel monitor, I also love the two-way talkback feature.
The accessories that came with the monitor were also heavy duty. It came with a base for sitting on the top of a dresser or night stand that felt weighted enough to hold the camera (we did not use this option), wall anchors to attach it to a wall (we did not use this option either), and a clamp with a thick bendable arm (We used this option). We set ours up by clamping it to the rail of the crib and it
With a 1,000-foot range and DECT technology, the VTech Safe & Sound Digital Audio relays sound with excellent clarity. Two-way communication offers a way to calm a baby when he or she is waking up or trying to fall asleep. It also includes a night light for late-night feedings. The digital display indicates signal strength and power/battery life. This monitor offers a full range of alarms when your baby wakes — audio, indicator lights, and vibration.
We got our hands on this monitor in mid-2018 for testing. It's a wifi baby monitor, just like many other options on this list, meaning that it connects to your wireless router to stream a digital video and audio signal to your smart phone wherever you are in the world. What's unique about this Safety 1st wifi baby monitor is that it also includes a wireless speaker pod that you can place anywhere in your house so you can listen in on your baby when you don't want to turn on your smart phone. This is nice during the night when you don't want to turn on your bright screen, or when your phone battery is low and you need to recharge. And the speaker pod has a batter that lasts for about 10-12 hours, so you can easily bring it into different rooms. So that's a nice added feature. And there are some additional features worth mentioning. First, it streams video in high definition 720p, though we do point out that it's basically impossible to stream 720p in real-time to your phone unless you're on the same local network (i.e. if you're at home). But that limitation isn't unique to the Safety 1st, and any wifi monitor that appears to be streaming in real-time HD is likely buffering the video for several seconds before it gets to you (so what you're seeing is delayed). Second, we were impressed with the nice wide-angle camera (130-degrees horizontal field of view), which means that it's more accommodating if you want to position the camera closer to the crib. Third, you can set up movement and sound alerts and customize the sensitivity of the alerts on your app to make sure you're getting an alert when it's important but also avoiding too many false alarms. We liked that you can change the sensitivity of the alerts, and thought that feature worked pretty well in our testing. The auto-recorded 30-second clips were also a nice touch so you can see what was going on when the alert was triggered. Some other things we liked were that the night vision was pretty good quality, you can zoom in and out (but you can't pan or tilt) using the app, there's a two-way intercom so you can talk to your baby, and you can expand the system to multiple cameras that you can toggle between using the app (you can't view multiple cameras simultaneously, however). So how does this wifi baby monitor compare to the other top rated wifi monitors on this list? Well, there's some good and bad. Setup was pretty easy, so that's definitely good, though the owner's manual was a bit difficult to understand at times. And once we got it running, it seemed to stay up and running pretty reliably, so that's also a plus. Also, there's no necessary subscription to store the 30-second clips you record for 30 days in the cloud. So here are some things that we didn't like about this monitor: first, many times when we open the app on our phone, the live stream doesn't connect immediately - sometimes we would restart the app, and other times we'd just need to wait several seconds. That's frustrating when you just received an alert and go to see what's going on, but can't. Second, if your internet goes down you're basically screwed. Unlike the Nanit and Lollipop, it will not revert to streaming over your local area network in the event of an internet outage - so even if you're at home, you won't be able to use the app or otherwise view the video. Third, the camera has a bright little light on it, which we ended up covering with electrical tape. Finally, we found the speaker pod unusually difficult to use, and were disappointed that a charger wasn't even included with it (or maybe it was just missing from our box?). Anyway, so there are some really nice features and high potential for this to be a great baby monitor, but in the end we found several limitations that made it difficult for us to justify spending upwards of $200 on it (note that it's about $150 without the speaker pod). But we'll let you make that decision. Interested? You can check out the Safety 1st HD wifi Baby Monitor here.
Like many monitors in this price range, the SafeVIEW provides a lot of bells and whistles: remote zoom, tilt and pan of the camera, two-way communication and a range of 900 feet so you don’t have to stress about chatting with your neighbor outside during naptime. The SafeVIEW also has a built-in nightlight that you can turn on and off using the monitor. And, if the monitor is going nuts every time a big truck drives by or during a thunderstorm, you can decrease its sound sensitivity to not pick up the background noise.
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