With more than 24,000 Amazon reviewers giving this monitor a near five-star rating, we’re proud to include the Infant Optics DXR-8 video baby monitor on our list of best baby monitors. Parents rave about its crystal-clear picture in both light and darkness, and the interchangeable wide-angle lens for larger viewing areas (sold separately). Not only that, the DXR-8 has the ability to pan and zoom across baby’s room without parents having to enter the room and move or adjust the camera. We think these features make the Infant Optics DXR-8 the best video baby monitor.


Overall rating: F-. I really dislike this monitor and wish I purchased something else. Are most of my problems with the monitor the result of my own incompetence? Yes, but a solid 30% is design flaws and needless features. My competence levels highly correspond to the amount of sleep I get, and a new baby means I'm pretty incompetent. But I want a monitor that accounts for that and doesn't make it easier for me to (1) Wake up the freaking baby; or (2) make it easier for my partner to wake me up (or vice versa) when I finally have a chance.

Perusing Amazon customer reviews, one readily sees why the FBM3501 is a popular choice. As one wrote, it delivers the “best bang for the buck.” With “clear” picture and sound quality, well-constructed and “solid” camera unit, the FBM3501 also has a handy, power-saving VOX setting that automatically shuts off the monitor after 20 seconds of silence and automatically turns it back on when noise is detected.

At roughly a third of the price of our pick, the VTech is far more affordable. For most people, losing video is a major sacrifice, of course, and we’re certain that most parents looking for a first monitor will prefer being able to do a visual check-in on a baby. Budget advantages aside, we could see this being best for parents of toddlers who are considering replacing a failing monitor, and who know they will likely use a monitor only at night as a way to hear a kid crying out from a distant bedroom. Many reviewers have also found it useful as a way for adults to communicate, especially for caretakers who need to be able to hear when adults with mobility or medical issues need help in another room.


To test each camera’s night vision, we used the monitors in darkened bedrooms with blackout curtains, with and without night-lights. For a more extreme test, we set the cameras up in a windowless room in a basement with a towel blocking light from the door. We aimed all of the cameras at a doll’s face approximately 6 feet across the room, looked at the monitors, and tried not to creep ourselves out.
Internet speed is a challenge with wifi cameras and wifi baby monitors: people want cameras with high definition video (720p or 1080p), but most internet connections are nowhere near fast enough to stream that high-quality video in real time. So parents get really frustrated with their HD wifi baby monitors because they find the video choppy, laggy, and unreliable. Most modern wifi cameras allow you to lower the resolution of the video so you can still see your baby, but not in high def.
Most dual monitors come with split- or even quad-screen viewing, and the DBPower Digital Sound Activated baby monitor does just that. This model supports up to four cameras, allowing you to monitor four rooms at once. With features like remote pan/tilt/zoom, room temperature monitoring and alert, two-way communication and manual or automatic video recording, we found the DBPower to be the best dual baby monitor.

This monitor is known for its zoom lens, included in the box, that lets you see your baby up close even if you have to position it farther away from the crib. You can use the monitor to remotely adjust the camera, and you don’t have to worry about plugging the monitor in overnight—it can sit on your nightstand for up to 10 hours in the power-saving mode (similar to sleep mode on your computer, but it still provides sound monitoring while the display is off) and up to six hours with the display screen constantly on.
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