We tested monitors daily over a period of several months, in three houses: one nearly 100 years old with plaster walls, a newer home with standard drywall construction, and a two-level 1960s home with a driveway on another level from the kids’ rooms. We tried the Wi-Fi–enabled monitors with two routers, in separate test locations, to be sure that any connection issues were with the monitors themselves and not the Internet connection.
We had the 150 for our daughter and bought the 250 when our son was born. The 250 has superior sound quality but thats all it has going for it. The battery life is very poor, it no longer lasts more than five hours so when we take it up to bed with us it starts beeping at about 4am. There is a number to call for replacement batteries but they never answer the phone.
Every parent we spoke to agreed. A video monitor is the way to go. It’s the difference between getting up to check on your baby because you thought you heard a noise or glancing at a screen to see if you really need to get out of bed. Video monitors are useful well into the toddler years, too. That screen can help you decide whether you need to step in and comfort your child, or if you can wait out a tantrum.
If you’re a fan of movement sensor pads, this one works well (except on a memory foam mattress). The audio quality is good, while on the parent unit the battery life is over a day. The signal is brilliant, even in the garden – and as soon as it weakens, you’ll get a warning alarm (which also goes off when the battery is low). We also found the temperature sensor and sound-sensitive lights lived up to their promise and the belt-clip quick to attach. But good luck setting it up – the instructions aren’t great and, unusually, it doesn’t have rechargeable batteries.
We have had two of these, so far! First one stopped working after 6 months. The second stopped working after about 18 months. Initially the digital display started deteriorating. You couldn't read the temp etc until it got to the point that there were just random black marks; totally useless. Eventually it just stopped working and wouldn't switch on. Only saving grace is that sound is pretty good. Between the first and the second one we had a Motorola one and that lasted 4 days before it was returned as we couldn't hear a thing. Not sure whether we'll buy the same one again? If you're happy to consider replacing your baby monitor perhaps even more than once, then this is for you! Surely there must be decent reliable monitors available that not only have good sound but will actually last a few years??

Terrible - lost connection throughout the night for the first few nights. Arlo support claimed it was a firmware issue and insisted it would be fixed upon updating to a new version. Once updated, still had the same issue. I’m not alone in this issue - check the Arlo Community boards regarding this product. I sent it back and bought the Nest cam and use it without issues as a baby monitor.


The Infant Optics DXR-8 has a superior battery life to any of the other video monitors we tested, as well as a simpler monitor interface that's more intuitive and easier to navigate than those found on competitors. The range, image quality, price, and many other features are comparable with those of the best competitors. Other good qualities include a basic but secure RF connection, an ability to pair multiple cameras, and simple tactile buttons.
This monitor is known for its zoom lens, included in the box, that lets you see your baby up close even if you have to position it farther away from the crib. You can use the monitor to remotely adjust the camera, and you don’t have to worry about plugging the monitor in overnight—it can sit on your nightstand for up to 10 hours in the power-saving mode (similar to sleep mode on your computer, but it still provides sound monitoring while the display is off) and up to six hours with the display screen constantly on.
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