I still love the quality of the camera. It is great. The echo from the mic still bothers me and I don't use it to talk to my little man at all. But what I've also discovered is you have to pair the camera every time you switch. Does that make sense?? you can have up to 4 cameras connected. but you can not switch between them at any given point without pushing the pair button on the back every time... That's such a bummer.

Watch your little one fall asleep on our high quality 2.8” video baby monitor screen. You’ll never miss a moment with the remote control pan and tilt function so you can change the angle of the camera from the comfort of your sofa. And with night vision you can still keep an eye on your little one even when the lights are down. Rest at ease with our temperature display feature, which will alert you if your babies room is too hot or cold. With five lullaby’s to choose from sooth your little one to asleep. And when you’re not in the room the two way communication talk back feature keeps your baby and you connected.
Arlo's accompanying app is simple to both set up and use, and includes the beneficial "Always Listening" mode, which lets you stream audio and monitor your baby even when your phone is locked or running other apps. From the Arlo app, you’ll be able to fully control the monitor, including the ability to take a screenshot, check the live feed, receive push notifications about your baby's activity or environment, and alter the nightlight.
As easy-to-use as it is adorable, the bunny-eared Netgear Arlo baby monitor matches your nursery’s décor while providing top-quality features and one of the best companion apps on the market. Measuring just 4.3 x 2.6 x 2.5 inches with the option for wall mounting, this device has a resolution between 360p and 1080p and includes six prerecorded lullabies. It even lets you upload your own playlist or record your own songs to play in the nursery, and has a color-changing nightlight for a soothing ambiance. But beyond its kid-friendly design, the Arlo is also a fully capable baby monitor that's outfitted with functionalities parents will love, like infrared night vision and temperature and air quality sensors.
Using the speaker, you can tell the Project Nursery camera to pan and tilt, play a lullaby, check the temperature in the nursery and more. You can do all this from any room that has an Alexa-powered speaker, so that you don't need to enter the nursery and risk waking up your sleeping baby. If you already own an Echo speaker, Project Nursery sells the Alexa-enabled camera on its own.

Baby video monitors with all the latest bells and whistles cost around $200, sometimes more depending on the feature set. However, you can find solid baby monitors for $100 to $150 less than that, though you'll sacrifice on video resolution and some features. Cloud storage can add to the cost of a baby monitor in the form of an ongoing subscription, though that feature is usually optional.
Looking at other Wi-Fi–enabled models, we don’t recommend getting the Ezviz Mini, the Palermo Wi-Fi Video Baby Monitor, or the LeFun C2, all of which Amazon reviewers report have connectivity issues, among other problems. We dismissed another Wi-Fi monitor we tested—the Evoz Glow Baby Monitor—for being harder to set up than the iBaby monitor, our former recommendation, and for not being notably better than the iBaby in any other way.
A WiFi monitor gets rid of the parent unit entirely and replaces it with a smartphone app. That app connects to the baby unit over the internet, rather than standard radio frequencies. As a result, you’ll never have to worry about being out of range from your camera. If you’re at dinner and want to check in on the babysitter, you’re still connected. Since it operates from an app, it’s also easier to flip through features than trying to figure out a finicky, low-quality touchscreen, or a dozen different buttons.
With a radio monitor, static is bound to occur, but to prevent unnecessary sound interference, make sure your cordless devices aren’t operating on the same frequency. To check, look at the back or side of a cordless device and make note of what frequency it operates on. So when you do purchase a baby monitor, you’ll know what frequencies to avoid or what devices could cause interference.
Range of signal: Some baby monitors have better range than others. If you live in a big house with multiple rooms, range will be a key consideration for you. Anyone who lives in a single-story house or a smaller apartment may not need as much range. Many baby monitors have an alert when you get out of range, and the packaging typically gives you an estimate of the range. Bear in mind that range varies widely from home to home. The construction of the walls between you and the baby monitor may even limit the range.
Thought this was finally going to be the one. We had tried several different monitors, each with their own problems, and this one looked promising. At first glance I thought it seemed a bit flimsy, as the plastic parts on the monitor (like the buttons) jiggled in place and made a rattling sound. The picture and quality was fine, and the range was pretty good, but the deal-breaker for me was the fact that when using VOX mode, you cannot control how long the screen stays on for. It turns on at the slightest sound, even on low sensitivity, and stays on for a minimum of 2 minutes. That gets really annoying in the middle of the night when it's always turning on and lighting up the whole room and you just want to get some sleep.
However, when it came to actually functionality, the DXR-8 was by far the BETTER choice. The on-screen touch controls of the Samsung lagged and were difficult to use. The Samsung’s touch screen is far different than the touch screen on their cell phones, their touch screen has little sensors throughout that you can see if you look at it closely. The Samsung also went out of range (as noted in many of the pictures) when compared to the DXR-8. In one picture I took both units outside. The DXR-8 went over 200’ from my house (and probably could have gone much further). The Samsung went out of range before I even got out the door. The Samsung unit failed at three different areas in my house. Trust me when I tell you that I didn’t make the test easy either. I had three doors shut and about four walls separating the handheld units from their cameras. I took them throughout the house, side-by-side, at the same time. Save yourself both time and $$$ and just start with the Infant Optics DXR-8. Additional pros of the DXR-8 include the on-screen temperature display of the baby’s room, and a brighter display (the Samsung display was rather disappointing, I thought it would have been the far better display, but it simply was not). The only con of the DXR-8 is the smaller screen size, but it is sufficient. Both units functioned about the same when it came to night vision.
This monitor offers lots of convenient features. Don’t have the best view of your baby? Use the monitor to remotely pan, tilt or zoom the camera without having to go back into the nursery. Fussy baby? Press a button to play lullabies. Need the camera to move from your bedroom to the nursery? No problem: this freestanding monitor can be set on top of a dresser or grip onto shelves and brackets. You can also unplug it and use it in another room for up to three hours on a single charge. And there’s a room temperature display. But the most impressive feature is its 1,000-foot range—the highest of all cameras on this list. That means you can hear your little one’s every chirp even if you’re hanging out in your backyard.
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