Overall rating: F-. I really dislike this monitor and wish I purchased something else. Are most of my problems with the monitor the result of my own incompetence? Yes, but a solid 30% is design flaws and needless features. My competence levels highly correspond to the amount of sleep I get, and a new baby means I'm pretty incompetent. But I want a monitor that accounts for that and doesn't make it easier for me to (1) Wake up the freaking baby; or (2) make it easier for my partner to wake me up (or vice versa) when I finally have a chance.
Type: After considering the options, weighing the relative advantages, and experiencing many firsthand, we determined that our ideal monitor would be an RF (radio frequency) video monitor rather than one of the two main alternatives: a Wi-Fi (or cloud-based) model that you can check on your phone, and bare-bones audio-only speakers. We approached our research with an open mind, gave an equal chance to all three types, and ended up with a pick from each category.
One of the primary uses of baby monitors is to allow attendants to hear when an infant wakes, while out of immediate hearing distance of the infant. Although commonly used, there is no evidence that these monitors prevent SIDS, and many doctors believe they provide a false sense of security.[1] Infants and young children can often be heard over a baby monitor in crib talk, in which they talk to themselves. This is a normal part of practising their language skills.
If you sleep in the same room as your baby or live in a small enough space that you can always hear or see what your baby is up to, you probably don’t need a monitor. Otherwise, most parents enjoy the convenience a baby monitor provides—instead of needing to stay close to the nursery or constantly checking on your child, you’re free to rest, catch up on Netflix or get things done around the house during naptime. Monitors can also double as a nanny cam to keep an eye on your child and their caretaker.
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