Clarity of Daytime and Night Vision: When wireless baby monitor systems with screens were first introduced onto the market they used somewhat outdated display technology that made for a grainy, distorted and often unreliable picture. Newer baby monitors use a liquid crystal display similar to the ones used in your smart phone and other consumer electronics, so these HD video baby monitors tend to have very nice color contrast and high resolution, and are also substantially more reliable. All of the stand-alone baby monitors we list above have high-quality displays, and we do not recommend some of the relatively old fashioned ones that can still be found on the market. Of course, night vision doesn't use color - so the display will be either grayscale or show a slightly green hue. That's important to keep in mind before you try it out for the first time; not even military special operations have color night vision, so don't expect anything amazing, even from the best baby monitor!
We tested several video monitors with poor picture quality, but this one impressed us, except in very dark rooms. The sound quality and signal range are notable and it’s robust and easy to work, with the lullabies, temperature sensor, intercom and feeder timer features all working well. Instead of a parent unit, the camera wirelessly connects to the wall-mountable hub which enables your smartphone or tablet to become your control station. On the upside, this means you have less to carry around; on the downside, you’re at the mercy of your wifi-connection. There are no tilt or pan options, but you can add more cameras.
If you’re looking for a feature-packed audio monitor that also gets the basics right, this is great. Importantly, it has good, clear instructions to get you going, as well as boasting a great signal range and battery life, plus two-way talk function. It’s robust and it’s so simple to use that even if a technophobic relative is babysitting, they’ll get the hang of it (as well as being grateful for the large 1.8in screen). Added extras can be gimmicky, but we rather liked the night light, star and moon lightshow and there’s a good choice of lullabies, nature sounds, classical music and white noise. At low volumes, you might struggle to hear clearly, though.
The BT Video Monitor 6000 features 5 relaxing lullabies, perfect for soothing your little one to sleep. Sound level lights keep you aware of baby’s sounds even when you don’t want to hear every snuffle. The video monitor’s remote control pan, tilt and zoom allow you to adjust the camera to focus on your baby, making sure you never miss a moment. With night vision, you can keep watch over your little one even in the dark.
If you want to spend as little as possible without compromising on quality, this basic digital model is easy to get going and doesn’t mind being dropped. It has a better range than others we tried in this price range and the sound quality is good too, although you might struggle to hear clearly at low volumes. Don’t expect any whizzy features – you can’t talk back to your baby and there’s no warning to let you know if you’re out of signal range, for instance. There is a low-battery alarm, but you can’t recharge either unit. We’d have liked the units to be easier to tell apart, but for less than £20, this is still a very good investment.

Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.
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