I have purchased SO MANY monitors, and this is the one we're keeping! We tried AngelCare, Summer Infant, and VTech monitors (multiple models), and the signal wouldn't quite reach from the nursery to our bedroom with any of them. This one not only reaches with a strong signal, but it even works on our patio outside! No bells and whistles like some of the others (no wide angle lens, picture quality isn't crystal clear), but it has everything that was important to me (temperature sensor, sound-activated mode, long range, talk feature). Added bonus - it's super lightweight and thin, so traveling with it will be so easy!
The Infant Optics DXR-8 has a superior battery life to any of the other video monitors we tested, as well as a simpler monitor interface that's more intuitive and easier to navigate than those found on competitors. The range, image quality, price, and many other features are comparable with those of the best competitors. Other good qualities include a basic but secure RF connection, an ability to pair multiple cameras, and simple tactile buttons.
One minor but potentially annoying flaw: The “on” lights on the parent unit of the Infant Optics are a touch bright, and you may be more sensitive to them because you’re likely to have the unit within view as you sleep. They appear as greenish yellow light from the face of the unit, and a charging light, which is blue when the monitor’s fully charged. Depending on how sensitive you are to light, you may want to lay the display face-down on a nightstand or cover the status lights with tape.
The system’s viewing screen has a row of LEDs, which allow you to see the sound of your baby’s voice, and alerts you if he or she is crying. The system has two-way talk, so if you want to calm your baby down, you can speak into the intercom push-to-talk button. Plus, the screen has a remote in-room temperature display, so you can always see if your baby is comfortable and safe.
As much as new parents want to be in the room with baby at all times, sometimes a baby monitor is necessary (like when you’re having a dinner party — or just want to watch Insecure in the next room). To help navigate the vast, confusing universe of baby monitors, we spoke to Lauren Kay, the Bump’s deputy editor, and Dave Baldwin, Fatherly’s former gear-and-tech editor and current play editor, about their recommendations, from traditional video monitors to smart-tech-enabled devices that can even track how your baby is sleeping. Add one of these to the baby registry.

Baby monitors are just one way to keep track of your little one. For newborns, the Snoo Smart Sleeper is a bed that gently rocks your baby for better sleep, and connects to an app on your phone that lets you receive alerts when your little one needs attention. The Owlet Smart Sock 2, meanwhile, is a connected pulse oximeter that allows you to check on your baby's vitals any time through an app, and will notify you automatically if there's a problem. The Sproutling from Fisher Price is a motion and heart rate sensor that straps to the back of your baby's calf and collects data while he or she sleeps.


I love everything about this camera except one thing. I love being able to review my child in another room morning or night. My biggest reason why why I chose this monitor was because I didn't mean to connect too. The picture is very clear I love being able to talk my child from another room letting him know that I will be there soon period what I dislike is how my voice over the monitor. I kind of sound like a robot period it kind of has an echo and a small high pitch. Other than that, this camera is great.
I came across an interesting analysis on the matter on ArsTechnica. There's a reason California's governor took time to sign the bill. It's likely constitutionally airtight, courtesy of the direct actions of the FCC. You see, the internet service providers didn't know they had it good until Mr.Pai stated that the FCC didn't have the legal ability to regulate the internet. Since the FCC has now abdicated all responsibility in the matter, that now puts it at the discretion of the state to implement (a state right), and now they (the ISPs) will get fifty sets of laws from fifty different states, each different, with California’s resurrected 2015 federal law being the toughest. Sometimes, you shoot yourself in the leg.
Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.
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