This video monitor boasts exceptionally clear sound, which we didn’t find was affected by interference from other devices, plus there’s a clear picture, which only drops in quality in particularly low light. Signal-wise, you can go into the garden with peace of mind and it’s easy to set up with the mains-powered camera to see your baby from lots of different angles. You can zoom in remotely, although you can’t tilt the camera remotely, which may not be ideal for fidgety babies. It withstands drops and it has lullabies and other sounds, as well as various alarms and lights. Shame the battery life isn’t long longer than six hours, though.
Great baby camera with a lot of options. The camera is very clear and available in 1080p. It even can sense the air quality and alerts you. Negative is that the new firmware has issues with the speaker. The speaker is very glitchy and will not work at times. I hope they fix the issues with the speaker. Has free cloud service so that you can store the video for a week.
If you want to be as streamlined as possible and happen to have extra Apple devices hanging around, the Bump recommends the Cloud Baby Monitor app, which turns your iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and even your laptop into a secure Wi-Fi baby monitor. Use one device in the nursery as a camera, then have high-quality live video and audio transmitted to a secondary device, or even a third or fourth. Using the “parent unit,” you can talk to your child through two-way video and audio, turn on lullabies or white noise, and adjust the night-light on the other side. The app will also alert you to any noise and motion occurring in the other room.

This video monitor boasts exceptionally clear sound, which we didn’t find was affected by interference from other devices, plus there’s a clear picture, which only drops in quality in particularly low light. Signal-wise, you can go into the garden with peace of mind and it’s easy to set up with the mains-powered camera to see your baby from lots of different angles. You can zoom in remotely, although you can’t tilt the camera remotely, which may not be ideal for fidgety babies. It withstands drops and it has lullabies and other sounds, as well as various alarms and lights. Shame the battery life isn’t long longer than six hours, though.
The Samsung SEW-3043W BrightView HD's primary advantages over our pick are a larger, crisper display and a sleeker-looking package overall. But it is not our pick because its main disadvantage—a slow and unresponsive touchscreen—is such an annoying flaw that we're sure you'd prefer our pick's reliable tactile controls. The Samsung also falls short of our pick on battery life and because of other long-term battery and charging issues. On many other measures, the two monitors came out more or less even.
- the button placement makes it easy to accidentally switch on the annoying music (why would you want this feature on a baby monitor???) that the camera can pipe (loudly) out in the baby's room. You know where this is going - the stupid music that you didn't want in the first place turns on and wakes up the baby you just spent an hour trying to put down. FML.
It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
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