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Poor quality and durability plague many baby monitors. Scores of reviewers on Amazon and other sites report that the Hello Baby HB32; Motorola MPB854Connect, MBP36XL, MBP33XL, MBP41, and MBP843Connect; Infant Optics DXR-5; Summer Infant Dual View, In View 2.0, and Sure Sight 2.0; Levana Jena, Ayden, and Astra; Angelcare AC420; Philips Avent SCD570 and SCD630/SCD637; and VTech VM342-2 and VM343 don’t deliver on promised functionality and start to fail in some critical capacity within a year—often in much less time.
After considering 43 of the most highly rated baby monitors and testing nine of them for more than 140 hours—on top of more than six years of regular monitor use as parents—we’re confident that the Infant Optics DXR-8 is the best baby monitor available. Compared with competitors, it has a more intuitive interface that’s easier to use, better battery life on its parent unit (aka the monitor), and a general simplicity and reliability that make it the easiest to use overall.
Baby monitors are just one way to keep track of your little one. For newborns, the Snoo Smart Sleeper is a bed that gently rocks your baby for better sleep, and connects to an app on your phone that lets you receive alerts when your little one needs attention. The Owlet Smart Sock 2, meanwhile, is a connected pulse oximeter that allows you to check on your baby's vitals any time through an app, and will notify you automatically if there's a problem. The Sproutling from Fisher Price is a motion and heart rate sensor that straps to the back of your baby's calf and collects data while he or she sleeps.
It should come as no surprise that we selected Nanit as the best baby monitor overall—after all, it was the winner of The Bump Best of Baby Awards this year. Nanit gives you both a clear, unobstructed view of baby thanks to the over-the-crib mount as well as sleep insight reports and nightly sleep scores via an app. You not only see how baby sleeps, but learn how to help baby sleep better.
The VTech DM221 audio monitor is the best choice in the category—it's consistently a best seller at multiple retailers, with thousands of positive customer reviews. Losing video is a major sacrifice, of course, but we could see this monitor being a good choice for parents of toddlers who are considering replacing a failing monitor, or people who want a monitor only so they can hear their kid crying out from a distant bedroom.
I love everything about this camera except one thing. I love being able to review my child in another room morning or night. My biggest reason why why I chose this monitor was because I didn't mean to connect too. The picture is very clear I love being able to talk my child from another room letting him know that I will be there soon period what I dislike is how my voice over the monitor. I kind of sound like a robot period it kind of has an echo and a small high pitch. Other than that, this camera is great.
This video monitor boasts exceptionally clear sound, which we didn’t find was affected by interference from other devices, plus there’s a clear picture, which only drops in quality in particularly low light. Signal-wise, you can go into the garden with peace of mind and it’s easy to set up with the mains-powered camera to see your baby from lots of different angles. You can zoom in remotely, although you can’t tilt the camera remotely, which may not be ideal for fidgety babies. It withstands drops and it has lullabies and other sounds, as well as various alarms and lights. Shame the battery life isn’t long longer than six hours, though.

It depends on how you want to use it. If it’s important to you that you can see your baby when you’re away from home, the app connectivity would be a must. However, if you’re simply looking for a baby monitor for domestic use, I can’t see the benefit of using an app to watch your baby or control the camera when you can do that from the 6000’s parent unit.
Ease of setup and installation factored heavily into our ratings, including whether an account needed to be created and if there were any extra subscription fees necessary. Each unit had cords protruding out of its back, so design wasn't much of a factor in my choice, though parents should take care to keep dangling cords and wires away from their children's reach when setting up a monitor.
The patterns you see in most owner reviews support our findings, with various folks noting the excellent video quality, and, often, ultimately rating the product poorly because of its inability to consistently maintain a connection, problems with the app, issues with the app’s updates not working with their particular phone, or other basic connection problems.

The iBaby’s video and audio quality were among the best in the WiFi group, but like all WiFi monitors, quality and how well it displays real-time action depends largely on your internet quality and speed. Our testers only experienced a delay of less than a second, more noticeable than HelloBaby’s, but nowhere close to Motorola’s three-second delay.
But these nursery essentials can be as fussy as the babies they keep tabs on. And like virtually every other household appliance, they are growing increasingly more capable and complex. In addition to conventional video baby monitors that use a camera and a handheld LCD display, often called a “parent unit,” there are now also Wi-Fi-enabled systems that connect to your home network and use your smartphone as both the display and the controller, much like DIY home security cameras. These latter models offer high-defition video, intelligent alerts, and the ability to check on your child from anywhere you have an internet connection.

I have purchased SO MANY monitors, and this is the one we're keeping! We tried AngelCare, Summer Infant, and VTech monitors (multiple models), and the signal wouldn't quite reach from the nursery to our bedroom with any of them. This one not only reaches with a strong signal, but it even works on our patio outside! No bells and whistles like some of the others (no wide angle lens, picture quality isn't crystal clear), but it has everything that was important to me (temperature sensor, sound-activated mode, long range, talk feature). Added bonus - it's super lightweight and thin, so traveling with it will be so easy!
Ranked as the No. 1 best seller on Amazon.com, the Infant Optics DXR-8 Video Baby Monitor is the first of its kind to have an interchangeable optical lens capability. This allows for a customized viewing angle with zooming capabilities. The system uses three lenses: a normal aluminum lens that provides a crisp clear image with mid-range coverage, an optical zoom lens perfect for close-up viewing during sleep, and a wide angle lens (sold separately) that captures your entire room with a full 170 degree panoramic view. This, along with invisible IR night vision makes it one of the most optical cameras of a baby monitor on the entire list.
We had stopped using the monitor a few months ago post sleep training but recently decided to bring it back as we are about take her pacifier and we are in the month log transition to one nap. Welp I couldn’t see anything so I ordered this handy dandy mount arm thing. It was set up in 3 minutes and I’m staring at my sleeping angel and can see pacifier. The way it holds the camera by the base is great. It’s pointed in the right direction and I can adjust the view with the monitor. I have a Motorola connect WiFi camera. I don’t know about durability yet. We have it set up on furniture facing down into her bed.
A word of caution about extremely cheap baby video monitors (we're talking devices that cost less than $50): they're not known for their security and can be hacked. Be sure to always change the default password of any connected device you purchase. You can also protect yourself by sticking to known vendors who post frequent firmware updates and have easy-to-reach customer support.
Receiving four out of five stars based on almost 400 Amazon customer reviews, the FBM3501 boasts of a price competitive with the Infant Optics DXR-5 (see below). It has features found only in much more expensive baby monitors such as a PTZ camera, two-way talkback capability and a built-in temperature monitor. It even includes optional alerts such as a feeding timer.
Not everyone needs a baby monitor. If you live in a smaller house or apartment, keep your infant in close proximity, or just generally don’t feel the need to monitor your baby as they’re sleeping (the infant cry is hard to miss!), you may find that a monitor is unnecessary. Other people may want a monitor only for occasional use, like when you’re out in your yard while your baby is napping and want to know when they’ve woken up.
Ease of setup and installation factored heavily into our ratings, including whether an account needed to be created and if there were any extra subscription fees necessary. Each unit had cords protruding out of its back, so design wasn't much of a factor in my choice, though parents should take care to keep dangling cords and wires away from their children's reach when setting up a monitor.
This video monitor boasts exceptionally clear sound, which we didn’t find was affected by interference from other devices, plus there’s a clear picture, which only drops in quality in particularly low light. Signal-wise, you can go into the garden with peace of mind and it’s easy to set up with the mains-powered camera to see your baby from lots of different angles. You can zoom in remotely, although you can’t tilt the camera remotely, which may not be ideal for fidgety babies. It withstands drops and it has lullabies and other sounds, as well as various alarms and lights. Shame the battery life isn’t long longer than six hours, though.

I would definitely recommend this monitor to other mums. I absolutely love the two-way function on the BT Audio Baby Monitor 450 – if my little boy wakes up I can talk to him and settle him without having to go into his room. This is a great timesaver and is something my original baby monitor didn’t have. I also love the design of the BT Audio Baby Monitor 450; it’s very stylish and would look good in any nursery.
The Babysense Video Baby Monitor seems to be popular—although Fakespot rates its reviews a C—and it has a smaller video screen than our pick. The battery life may be a little lower as well (the manufacturer doesn’t offer a claim on battery life, and many reviewers say they either keep it plugged in or get acceptable battery life on an audio-only eco mode). At this price, about half the cost of our pick, those compromises may seem acceptable to you. It shares many other features with our pick, including two-way talk-back, pan/tilt/zoom options, and a temperature display.
Watching your child from moment to moment is far more important than going over footage from previous nights, so baby monitors don't usually make a big deal about saving video for later, whether using built-in storage or through a cloud service. They can take snapshots and short clips when they detect movement, but they won't offer time-lapse videos of entire nights at once, or let you page through hours or days of footage. Those features are useful for identifying burglars, but they don't really help you watch your child unless you're in a Paranormal Activity sequel.
At night, switch to "audio only" mode to use it as a traditional monitor, or use the camera's infrared night vision to keep an eye on your little one even when it's dark. If your baby needs comforting, the two-way talk feature lets you communicate with them even if you aren’t in the same room. The Shiloh also has built-in temperature monitoring that lets you know if your baby's room is getting uncomfortably hot or cold. The battery lasts for up to 12 hours at a time.

The Infant Optics DXR-8’s interchangeable optical lens, which allows for customized viewing angles, truly sets this monitor apart. It gives the option of focusing in on a localized area or taking in the whole room. Couple that with the remote pan/tilt control and night vision and you’ve got a monitoring system that not only grows along with your baby, but one that can be adjusted to follow her around the room as she plays. Parents can calm their baby with the two-way talk feature and monitor the temperature to make sure the baby is safe and secure.


Other features, which you may or may not want, include lullabies, temperature sensors, night lights, light shows, feeding timers and intercoms. Do you want to use a parent unit or your own smartphone or tablet? If you go for a parent unit, do you want it to be able to withstand drops? What about the battery life? And are the batteries rechargeable? Do you want a belt-clip? If using your phone or tablet, is the app straightforward to use?
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Both Baldwin and Kay recommend iBaby’s M6S Wi-Fi video monitor for its design and ease of use. Resembling a little robot, the iBaby offers 360-degree views and 110-degree tilt, 1080p video with night vision, and even comes equipped with lullabies. Other features include temperature, humidity, and air-quality sensors, which Baldwin admits are bells and whistles, but could be useful depending on what kind of parent you are. And, of course, everything comes straight through to your smartphone or tablet, which can also remotely control settings. And while some parents may be concerned about potential hacking of Wi-Fi monitors, Baldwin found that the risk is fairly low and usually occurred in cheap, off-brand models.
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