The interface on the monitor, aka the parent unit, is basic, simple, and intuitive, while many of its competitors have awkward controls. When panning and tilting the camera, for example, the Infant Optics responds immediately and can move in very small increments. The text on the menu displays look like something off of an old Motorola RAZR, but the commands are easy to interpret and less confusing than those of some competitors. A group of four buttons makes it easy to pull up the menu and make a change (to the volume, say) without losing sight of the image on the screen. Other nice minor touches, like a display that constantly notes the temperature in the baby’s room, appear on this model but not on all of its competitors. This is not a touchscreen, but frankly, if you’ve ever used an iPhone, you’ll find the touchscreens on most baby monitors to be sorely substandard.

- Super annoying chime/short song plays every single time you turn the monitor's video screen on. Inevitably, when checking the monitor in the middle of the night, you will turn it off, and when you have to turn it back on again, you will wake up your partner. The little chime is charming at first (cute penguin illustration!) but makes you want to jam a pencil in your ear the 400th time you hear it.
One minor but potentially annoying flaw: The “on” lights on the parent unit of the Infant Optics are a touch bright, and you may be more sensitive to them because you’re likely to have the unit within view as you sleep. They appear as greenish yellow light from the face of the unit, and a charging light, which is blue when the monitor’s fully charged. Depending on how sensitive you are to light, you may want to lay the display face-down on a nightstand or cover the status lights with tape.

We have had two of these, so far! First one stopped working after 6 months. The second stopped working after about 18 months. Initially the digital display started deteriorating. You couldn't read the temp etc until it got to the point that there were just random black marks; totally useless. Eventually it just stopped working and wouldn't switch on. Only saving grace is that sound is pretty good. Between the first and the second one we had a Motorola one and that lasted 4 days before it was returned as we couldn't hear a thing. Not sure whether we'll buy the same one again? If you're happy to consider replacing your baby monitor perhaps even more than once, then this is for you! Surely there must be decent reliable monitors available that not only have good sound but will actually last a few years??


Child Safety: We care a lot about the safety and well-being of your babies, and our baby monitor reviews are no exception to that rule. Most of the safety issues with baby monitor systems revolve around the parent's due diligence: secure the wires out of reach and out of sight from your baby, make sure you put the camera out of reach (especially when you're mounting to the rail of a crib), and always keep them away from water and a running humidifier. In addition to these basic safety tips, the newer heart rate monitoring, breathing monitoring, and movement monitoring systems can add confidence to parents worried about their baby sleeping in a different room. A good example of a baby monitor with heart rate monitoring is the Owlet Smart Sock that can track heart rate and blood oxygenation levels, and stream that information to an app on your smart phone. Of course, don't be too confident because these devices are not hospital- or laboratory-grade monitoring systems, so keep that in mind.

In terms of battery life for the monitor, we had no issues once we figured out our schedule. We used it pretty much throughout the day unplugged and kept it plugged in overnight night by our bed, pretty much like our phones. Occasionally we ran out of battery but not frequently enough where we thought there was something wrong. It was all we could ask for.
I have had the monitor for a little over a month and have had no issues. My last monitor was a Motorola mbp36 and gave out after 3 years. The Motorola was heavier and felt more durable, however it is also nice to have a lightweight monitor. The features have all worked well on the ANMEATE. I actually prefer the night vision on the ANMEATE as it's much clearer than it was on the Motorola. The two way talk and the zoom/pan feature seems equal on the two. I could move the actual camera angle via remote on the Motorola and I really miss that. Sometimes I put the camera at a bad angle and I get downstairs to the monitor just to realize I can't see the baby. Then I have to run back up and fix it instead of moving it with the remote. So that stinks, but now I try to angle the camera better the first time. My main reason for getting this monitor was the price. I could add more cameras for 40 instead of 100 a piece. Not to mention I got the first camera and parent unit for half the price of the Motorola.
On many of our requirements, the Infant Optics DXR-8 delivers as well as the best monitors we tried: It has an adequate range for home use, acceptable image quality, an ability to add on multiple cameras, and overall simplicity and ease of use with a minimum of annoying quirks. It doesn’t offer the remote access or video storage options of our Wi-Fi–enabled pick, and its dedicated monitor may not seem as convenient as accessing a view via your smartphone—but the Infant Optics is easier to use where it matters most: You just pick it up, poke a button, and put it back down. Most of its specific flaws concern battery life and charging, but this is a common problem among baby monitors, and the company has a good record of responding to customer service issues.

This video monitor boasts exceptionally clear sound, which we didn’t find was affected by interference from other devices, plus there’s a clear picture, which only drops in quality in particularly low light. Signal-wise, you can go into the garden with peace of mind and it’s easy to set up with the mains-powered camera to see your baby from lots of different angles. You can zoom in remotely, although you can’t tilt the camera remotely, which may not be ideal for fidgety babies. It withstands drops and it has lullabies and other sounds, as well as various alarms and lights. Shame the battery life isn’t long longer than six hours, though.


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This item really deserves every last one of the so good gadget.My wife and I are soon-to-be parents and we really wanted a so good monitor for our soon-to-be-born daughter. We looked at different options, anywhere from night vision, movement sensors, temperature sensors, view-in-your-cell-phone from anywhere, wifi, 1080P and a very long etc. Being soon-to-be-parents for the first time gave us the mindset that "money is not an issue", but nevertheless it would also be irresponsible to buy from impulse the most expensive monitor out there with all the bells and whistles that you may not use at all or may not be useful to you.It is the best one. I like it.
Child Safety: We care a lot about the safety and well-being of your babies, and our baby monitor reviews are no exception to that rule. Most of the safety issues with baby monitor systems revolve around the parent's due diligence: secure the wires out of reach and out of sight from your baby, make sure you put the camera out of reach (especially when you're mounting to the rail of a crib), and always keep them away from water and a running humidifier. In addition to these basic safety tips, the newer heart rate monitoring, breathing monitoring, and movement monitoring systems can add confidence to parents worried about their baby sleeping in a different room. A good example of a baby monitor with heart rate monitoring is the Owlet Smart Sock that can track heart rate and blood oxygenation levels, and stream that information to an app on your smart phone. Of course, don't be too confident because these devices are not hospital- or laboratory-grade monitoring systems, so keep that in mind.
-Night Vision:Two mode selection - 940nm LEDs invisible for nearing baby, 850nm LED for wall mounting. -Remote Music Playing:lullabies built-in. -Push to Talk:Live View Sharing - unlimited shared users. -Support Computer/ Mobile Phone / Tablet- Can Be used in Android 4.0 & IOS 7& Windows& iPad System. -Option- Lollipop Sensor :Temperature / Humidity / Air Quality. -Support local Storage UP to 128 GB(the SD Card not include)or Cloud Storage. -Unique Audio Mode Feature: The Only WiFiCam with Audio Mode for Overnight Monitor, Alarm while Network disconnect. -Audio Mode:Make you sleep better at night. -REAL Crying Detection:We do NOT detect decibels, Lollipop detects CRYING and NOISE. -Push Video Notification: Clear image and video day or night / Free latest video stor.
Security is a mixed bag, especially as baby monitors get more high tech. If tech giants like Apple and Google run into security flaws, high-tech baby monitors are sure to experience similar problems. However, some less high-tech baby monitors aren't secure, either, and many suffer from signal interference. We've checked each company's security policy to find the most secure options for you.
If you’re a fan of movement sensor pads, this one works well (except on a memory foam mattress). The audio quality is good, while on the parent unit the battery life is over a day. The signal is brilliant, even in the garden – and as soon as it weakens, you’ll get a warning alarm (which also goes off when the battery is low). We also found the temperature sensor and sound-sensitive lights lived up to their promise and the belt-clip quick to attach. But good luck setting it up – the instructions aren’t great and, unusually, it doesn’t have rechargeable batteries.
From a pure imaging standpoint, night vision is vital for watching your baby sleep from another room, and is standard for most baby monitors. Motorized pan and tilt (which lets you swivel the camera from afar) isn't quite as common, but is very welcome if you have a toddler and want to scan an entire room. High-definition is a nice plus, but you don't need the highest-resolution sensor to keep tabs on your baby—most of the monitors we test use 720p cameras rather than 1080p.
Though it’s not a video monitor, the Owlet does track your baby’s heart rate and oxygen while they sleep, and notifies you if something appears to be wrong. Just slip a comfortable wrap with a sensor over your wee one’s foot (it works with babies 0–18 months) and download the app to your phone. You’ll receive alerts in real-time should your child’s vital signs change. It also comes with a base station that changes color when something is up.
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