It depends on how you want to use it. If it’s important to you that you can see your baby when you’re away from home, the app connectivity would be a must. However, if you’re simply looking for a baby monitor for domestic use, I can’t see the benefit of using an app to watch your baby or control the camera when you can do that from the 6000’s parent unit.

BabyPing also works over 3G/4G and Wi-Fi networks. With easy set-up directly on your mobile device (no computer necessary), the BabyPing app enables parents to be one tap away from seeing and hearing what their baby is up to. The unit's Smart Filter ensures that all you hear is the baby, not background noise in the house. There is no functionality to talk to the baby through the app, but what differentiates BabyPing is its password-protected double-layer encrypted security, which gives parents the ability to give access to only those they wish to. BabyPing offers night vision to give parents full visibility into the dark nursery without disturbing the sleeping baby.
Great baby camera with a lot of options. The camera is very clear and available in 1080p. It even can sense the air quality and alerts you. Negative is that the new firmware has issues with the speaker. The speaker is very glitchy and will not work at times. I hope they fix the issues with the speaker. Has free cloud service so that you can store the video for a week.
Babies need constant attention, and most of the time parents can't be in their room at every hour. That's why Honrane team created a Video Baby Monitor to watch over their little ones at all times, making it a great option for you. It delivers wireless and portable baby monitoring making it convenient, reliable and secure for parents to use. Built-in with microphones and speakers that allow parents to hear every giggle, sigh and cry from their little ones. And soothe them through its button-activated musical melodies and lullabies.
If you'd like the flexibility of having a dedicated handheld monitor for use in the home, while still being able to rely on your Internet network on a mobile device, the Peek Plus Internet Monitor System is worth looking at. The Peek Plus connects directly to your home wireless network for instant access. You can begin viewing the stream on the included handheld monitor or via a dedicated Internet browser or complementary smartphone app (for iOS, Android and Blackberry), or both. The secure Internet page of your baby's video stream gives family and friends the ability to look in on your baby as well.
One of the biggest concerns with a baby monitor is going out of range and not hearing baby crying for you. Talk about a case of mom guilt! When shopping for the best long-range baby monitor, note that the range listed on the box doesn’t account for walls or doors; it’s a line-of-sight range. So, although you may not actually be able to travel 1,000 feet away from baby, you should be able to head to the basement to do laundry or be outside in the yard without worrying about missing baby’s cries.
The HelloBaby Video Baby Monitor has a 3.2-inch LCD screen and can transmit video up to roughly 900 feet. It has lots of great features you may not find on other budget video monitors, including two-way talk, night vision, a temperature display, zoom in and out, digital pan and tilt, a scan view and the ability to play eight lullabies. There’s also helpful warnings if the temperature gets too hot or cold, if there’s no signal and if there’s low power. Finally, the last great thing we love about this monitor is an “auto mute” feature that will turn off the baby monitor speaker when sound is below 50 decibels for more than seven seconds and automatically turn on when noise occurs, which saves battery.
Monitor options: We wanted easy, intuitive, responsive controls, whether they were on a touchscreen or physical buttons. We also wanted the monitor to withstand being knocked off of a nightstand or messed with by a toddler, and generally be tough enough for the rigors of life in a home with young children. We didn’t really care if we could set an alarm, use the monitor as a night-light, or play chintzy music through the camera—but seeing the temperature in the kids’ room was a detail we appreciated.
We had stopped using the monitor a few months ago post sleep training but recently decided to bring it back as we are about take her pacifier and we are in the month log transition to one nap. Welp I couldn’t see anything so I ordered this handy dandy mount arm thing. It was set up in 3 minutes and I’m staring at my sleeping angel and can see pacifier. The way it holds the camera by the base is great. It’s pointed in the right direction and I can adjust the view with the monitor. I have a Motorola connect WiFi camera. I don’t know about durability yet. We have it set up on furniture facing down into her bed.
The interface on the monitor, aka the parent unit, is basic, simple, and intuitive, while many of its competitors have awkward controls. When panning and tilting the camera, for example, the Infant Optics responds immediately and can move in very small increments. The text on the menu displays look like something off of an old Motorola RAZR, but the commands are easy to interpret and less confusing than those of some competitors. A group of four buttons makes it easy to pull up the menu and make a change (to the volume, say) without losing sight of the image on the screen. Other nice minor touches, like a display that constantly notes the temperature in the baby’s room, appear on this model but not on all of its competitors. This is not a touchscreen, but frankly, if you’ve ever used an iPhone, you’ll find the touchscreens on most baby monitors to be sorely substandard.
Other features, which you may or may not want, include lullabies, temperature sensors, night lights, light shows, feeding timers and intercoms. Do you want to use a parent unit or your own smartphone or tablet? If you go for a parent unit, do you want it to be able to withstand drops? What about the battery life? And are the batteries rechargeable? Do you want a belt-clip? If using your phone or tablet, is the app straightforward to use?

We had the 150 for our daughter and bought the 250 when our son was born. The 250 has superior sound quality but thats all it has going for it. The battery life is very poor, it no longer lasts more than five hours so when we take it up to bed with us it starts beeping at about 4am. There is a number to call for replacement batteries but they never answer the phone.


The mommy-to-be and I wanted to test both of these units side-by-side to see how they compared to each other. Samsung initially seemed like the better choice as it had the 5” screen compared to the DXR-8’s screen of only 3.5” The Samsung also had music playback on the camera in the baby’s room (4 different lullaby song choices), and a small night light on the top of the camera (which you can turn on and off).
We were also disappointed that the Angelcare’s parent unit lacks an out-of-range warning. If you’re in the backyard or basement and the monitor disconnects, it’s not clear whether you’re looking at a napping baby or a frozen screen. Still, it beat out the Baby Delight for sound and video quality and offers a few customizable features: You can adjust the volume on the baby unit as well as the parent unit, and set up timed alarms and temperature alerts.
Project Nursery offers a variety of monitor options that include fantastic features like remote camera control, two-way communication, motion, sound and temperature alerts and the ability to play white noise or lullabies. But what we like best about this one is that it comes with a traditional 5-inch screen monitor and a 1.5-inch mini video monitor that you can wear like a bracelet. Both monitors have a long battery life, too.
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