If all you want is a no-fuss audio monitor, the Bump and Baldwin both recommend VTech’s DM221 audio monitor, which consistently garners a lot of accolades. Using digital audio technology, the DM221 offers clear audio transmission and eliminates the crackle of analog models. A two-way intercom allows you to talk to your baby, while a five-level sound indicator can visually alert you to cries from the other room. The transmitter also features a soft night-light for your child. And don’t sleep on its compact size, which makes it perfect for travel.


However, some customers complained that the video feed can only be viewed live unless one wants to pay between US$100 – 300 per year for the Dropcam monthly recording service. While Dropcam will send a “tiny” thumbnail to an email address when motion is detected, it has been noted that the image is so small as to be “worthless.” Others cite streaming delays on LTE (4G) and Wi-Fi, problems with talkback and a “blurry” zoom image. Related to the first complaint is an observation that video can’t be saved on one’s smartphone or computer; for a monthly fee, it can only be retained “in the cloud” on Dropcam’s web database. To their credit, Dropcam’s engineering team has acknowledged the talkback audio and camera zoom problems and have taken steps to correct the issues.


It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
×