The Infant Optics DXR-8’s interchangeable optical lens, which allows for customized viewing angles, truly sets this monitor apart. It gives the option of focusing in on a localized area or taking in the whole room. Couple that with the remote pan/tilt control and night vision and you’ve got a monitoring system that not only grows along with your baby, but one that can be adjusted to follow her around the room as she plays. Parents can calm their baby with the two-way talk feature and monitor the temperature to make sure the baby is safe and secure.
Range of signal: Some baby monitors have better range than others. If you live in a big house with multiple rooms, range will be a key consideration for you. Anyone who lives in a single-story house or a smaller apartment may not need as much range. Many baby monitors have an alert when you get out of range, and the packaging typically gives you an estimate of the range. Bear in mind that range varies widely from home to home. The construction of the walls between you and the baby monitor may even limit the range.
Rechargeable batteries: Since the camera will most likely stay trained on your bundle of joy, it can remain plugged into AC power. But parent unit displays are designed to be always on and carried with you as you move from room to room. That can drain batteries quickly. Look for a parent unit that runs on rechargeable batteries, so you’re not constantly swapping them out.
The BT Video Baby Monitor 6000 is great for peace of mind while your baby sleeps. BT have scaled back on the large choice of lullabies and the light show, making it disappointing as a settling and soothing aid, but it performs well as a baby monitor with its large screen size and clear sound. Extra features like the remote control camera and noise-activated screen make it a very useful, if basic, device. It is also secure and hack-free for even more peace of mind.
As much as new parents want to be in the room with baby at all times, sometimes a baby monitor is necessary (like when you’re having a dinner party — or just want to watch Insecure in the next room). To help navigate the vast, confusing universe of baby monitors, we spoke to Lauren Kay, the Bump’s deputy editor, and Dave Baldwin, Fatherly’s former gear-and-tech editor and current play editor, about their recommendations, from traditional video monitors to smart-tech-enabled devices that can even track how your baby is sleeping. Add one of these to the baby registry.
But although the Arlo can be really impressive, it can also be annoying. Leaving aside that surprisingly impressive night-light, we found in testing that we weren’t using most of those extra features beyond trying them out for novelty’s sake. The Arlo is clearly the way to go if you want to access your camera while away from home. But baby monitors are far more commonly used in our own homes, often by our beds, running all night, with the video off and the audio on, and we peek in if there’s a sign of trouble. That’s about it.

Arlo Baby packs a ton of features every new parent will ever need for a nursery. Inside the camera are air quality, temperature, and humidity sensors that alert you when nursery conditions are out of desired range, multi-colored night light, and a music player that plays bedtime melodies or your own. All features can be remotely managed using the Arlo app.


One minor distinction about the DXR-8 is that it comes with two interchangeable optical lenses (a standard lens and a zoom lens) and you can also buy a wide-angle lens. Having three different lens options is nice, but in practice we felt that the zoom on the standard lens was sufficient, and we expect most buyers would probably not bother changing the lenses frequently, if ever.

The camera has to be plugged in at all times. The parent unit is rechargeable and it takes 12 hours to recharge fully, but half an hour to give it a little bit of juice after the battery has gone completely flat. The charging cable for the parent unit isn’t very long, but it could still be used while charging if you are happy just to let the screen turn on when your baby makes a noise instead of wanting to check the picture regularly, as it might get annoying to do so if it’s not in arm’s reach.


Guarantee available from www.bt.com/producthelp In the unlikely event of a defect occurring, the Your BT Baby Monitor 150 is guaranteed for a period Helpdesk will issue a Fault Reference Authorisation of 12 months from the date of purchase. (FRA) number and instructions for replacement or Subject to the terms listed below, the guarantee will repair.
I was either going to buy a Pi or Arduino, and Pi won the contest. The Raspberry pi stood out because it supports the ability to be a low power computer. Needless to say it's comparing a micro-controller development board with a fully capable computer. Add a Samsung Pro SDHC card and it's ready to go. I currently use mine to run XBMC for Pi; streaming videos from my NAS, Pandora Radio, and all the "freebee" add-ons available for multimedia. It runs 1080p movies just fine with some fine tweaking of the multipliers. HDMI is great, because I don't need a separate audio connection. I can even control my Pi with my Samsung's TV remote, because XBMC supports the HDMI-CEC. The included clear case is great because it protects my Pi, and all of the LED indicators line up perfectly when everything is snapped into place. The adapter is
BT baby monitors have been designed for a range of different needs meaning that we have a wide range of options available to parents and guardians. To make choose a baby monitor simpler we’ve compared all of our products against each other to help you find a solution that best suits your needs and those of your baby. Can’t decide between an audio and a video baby monitor? Not a problem, we’ve pulled all of the key details together for you to look through.
Traditional video baby monitors don't offer the same high-resolution picture quality we're used to seeing on our smartphones and tablets. If you want high-resolution video of your baby, you'll have to go with a Wi-Fi monitor like the NestCam that streams video to your phone or tablet. The Phillips AVENT SCD630 video monitor may not be high-res, but it's the best of the bunch.
A word of caution about extremely cheap baby video monitors (we're talking devices that cost less than $50): they're not known for their security and can be hacked. Be sure to always change the default password of any connected device you purchase. You can also protect yourself by sticking to known vendors who post frequent firmware updates and have easy-to-reach customer support.
Rechargeable batteries: Since the camera will most likely stay trained on your bundle of joy, it can remain plugged into AC power. But parent unit displays are designed to be always on and carried with you as you move from room to room. That can drain batteries quickly. Look for a parent unit that runs on rechargeable batteries, so you’re not constantly swapping them out.
Most connected baby monitors are effectively just home security cameras, like the Nest Cam Indoor—devices that let you watch another location with color video, night vision, and sound, so you can tell if anything is amiss. Because baby monitors are used to keep an eye on your little one rather than on your home and property, they prioritize different features than security cameras.
The Infant Optics DXR-8’s interchangeable optical lens, which allows for customized viewing angles, truly sets this monitor apart. It gives the option of focusing in on a localized area or taking in the whole room. Couple that with the remote pan/tilt control and night vision and you’ve got a monitoring system that not only grows along with your baby, but one that can be adjusted to follow her around the room as she plays. Parents can calm their baby with the two-way talk feature and monitor the temperature to make sure the baby is safe and secure.
The Infant Optics’s range within our test houses was never an issue, and, as with other monitors we tested, we had to walk outside and down the street before losing the signal. The image quality was good enough to make out facial details 6 feet away in a completely dark room (as it was on others we tested). You can easily add more cameras to the set—you can use up to four Infant Optics add-on cameras, which are separate purchases, usually for about $100. You can mount the camera on a wall easily; pan and tilt 270 and 120 degrees, respectively; and set the parent unit to scan between multiple cameras to keep an eye or ear on everybody at once—another nice feature that’s not unique to this model.
Receiving 4.1 out of 5 stars (and well over 500 5 star reviews) based on about 900 reviews from Amazon customers, the Dropcam Pro is lauded for its “very good video quality,” premium material assembly, quick and easy setup/commissioning and a field of view (130° diagonal) wider than most of its competitors. It also has PTZ (pan/tilt/zoom) camera and two-way talkback. Note that this product does not come with a separate, dedicated monitor; it uses mobile and web apps capability for PCDs such as smartphones, tablets and other computing devices. The Dropcam Pro supports dual band Wi-Fi (the standard 2.4 GHz and 5GHz) for improved wireless connectivity.
Both Kay and Baldwin chose the Infant Optics DXR-8 as their top choice in video baby monitors (it also has nearly 24,000 4.4-star reviews on Amazon). The DXR-8 uses secure 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission (as opposed to Wi-Fi) to send crystal clear color video and audio to the receiver, has a solid battery life, allows for remote pan, zoom, and tilt capabilities, and comes with an interchangeable zoom lens (with a wide-angle lens sold separately). Other features include a two-way intercom, remote temperature display, and the option to set the monitor to audio-only.
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