You can control the Arlo via multiple platforms, including Alexa, HomeKit, Google Assistant, and IFTTT. The camera itself can work wirelessly off a rechargeable battery for several hours (which no other monitor we’ve tested can do), and it can track and chart several days’ worth of temperature or humidity in a child’s room. You can set it to notify you if it detects unusual temperatures, humidity levels, or “air quality,” a VOC measure the Arlo Baby manual (PDF) suggests you alleviate by either opening a window or removing the source of the VOCs. (Our also-great pick for the best air purifier is one of the few that actually does genuinely eliminate VOCs, but it ain’t cheap.) If you find that the notifications are too frequent, you can adjust what’s triggering the alerts (by raising the threshold up to 80 ºF, for example, if you don’t want a notification telling you it’s too hot at 76 ºF). You can store video from the camera online, but in six years of parenthood we’ve never once wanted to review baby monitor footage.
The Nest Cam isn’t a dedicated baby monitor, but an all-around home protection device. Besides aiming the camera at the crib, you can also use it to keep an eye on the nanny, the dog or your empty home while you’re away. The video camera can be set up anywhere, and you can watch the live streaming from your smartphone. It also has two-way communication so you can soothe your little one to sleep, even if you’re offsite. If the device senses motion or sound, it’ll send a phone alert or an email to you. Missed what happened? From the app, you can view photos of any activity that took place over the last three hours. (There are Nest Aware subscriptions available that provide access to 5, 10 or 30 days of recordings, for $5, $10 or $30 a month, respectively). The picture quality is super sharp, too.

But, for many parents, a baby monitor is a part of daily life. A baby monitor gives you a camera and/or microphone near the crib, and a separate rechargeable parent unit (aka, a monitor) that connects wirelessly and can travel with you throughout the house, either working while plugged in or running off its battery. It's nice to see your children in bed, dreaming happily, sleeping in adorable new positions, cuddling with animals, and generally doing okay.

I love everything about this camera except one thing. I love being able to review my child in another room morning or night. My biggest reason why why I chose this monitor was because I didn't mean to connect too. The picture is very clear I love being able to talk my child from another room letting him know that I will be there soon period what I dislike is how my voice over the monitor. I kind of sound like a robot period it kind of has an echo and a small high pitch. Other than that, this camera is great.
General Usability: This one is two-fold. First we wanted to make sure each monitor could perform under bright, dim, and no light; and pick up even the faintest sounds. Then we looked at how easy it was to use the monitor. Could we adjust the screen brightness, or were we going to be half-blinded when we picked it up at 1AM? Was the monitor voice-activated, or does it pick up white noise in the background? How sensitive were the alarms, and did they sound like a baby-waking screech or a soft ping?
The picture quality is amazing, when not pixelated. The delay is minimal, except for when it's over 30 seconds. The sound is amazing, when the app doesn't turn it off on you randomly in the middle of the night. The temperature sensor is a nice to have, except it constant reports Temps about 10degF higher. The air quality sensor is nice to have, except the camera will read abnormal VOCs and after a reset will read minimal VOCs. The connection to your home wifi is aweful. We have a Netgear Nighthawk wireless router and the camera consistently disconnects about every three days, usually in the middle of the night and there is a random amount of time the sensor data is not recorded (which one can assume is the duration the camera is off). We bought a netgear branded wifi extender/access point and put it in the nursery and it really did not increase the connection reliability. We enabled QOS on the router and prioritized the camera, this also did not increase the connection reliability.

Long Range: Monitors that don’t connect to WiFi have a limited range, usually around 600 to 1,000 feet. While this is large enough for all but the biggest houses, we asked our testers to find out how far they could wander away — and how many walls they could put between them and the baby unit — before they went out of range, as well as to report back on what happened when they did. Sometimes there was an alarm or a notification, but other times the screen simply froze.
As easy-to-use as it is adorable, the bunny-eared Netgear Arlo baby monitor matches your nursery’s décor while providing top-quality features and one of the best companion apps on the market. Measuring just 4.3 x 2.6 x 2.5 inches with the option for wall mounting, this device has a resolution between 360p and 1080p and includes six prerecorded lullabies. It even lets you upload your own playlist or record your own songs to play in the nursery, and has a color-changing nightlight for a soothing ambiance. But beyond its kid-friendly design, the Arlo is also a fully capable baby monitor that's outfitted with functionalities parents will love, like infrared night vision and temperature and air quality sensors.
Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.
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