Despite ranking among Amazon’s top-selling baby monitors, the Motorola MBP36S and MBP33S, which are listed on the same page, have as many negative reviews as positive ones. Many reviewers complain about poor battery life and deficient quality and durability. BabyGearLab also gave these monitors a low rating, citing the “disappointing images and sound on a hard to use parental unit.”


Security is a mixed bag, especially as baby monitors get more high tech. If tech giants like Apple and Google run into security flaws, high-tech baby monitors are sure to experience similar problems. However, some less high-tech baby monitors aren't secure, either, and many suffer from signal interference. We've checked each company's security policy to find the most secure options for you.
Ranked as the No. 1 best seller on Amazon.com, the Infant Optics DXR-8 Video Baby Monitor is the first of its kind to have an interchangeable optical lens capability. This allows for a customized viewing angle with zooming capabilities. The system uses three lenses: a normal aluminum lens that provides a crisp clear image with mid-range coverage, an optical zoom lens perfect for close-up viewing during sleep, and a wide angle lens (sold separately) that captures your entire room with a full 170 degree panoramic view. This, along with invisible IR night vision makes it one of the most optical cameras of a baby monitor on the entire list.
It really depends on what you feel most comfortable with. There are audio monitors that allow you to listen to any noise coming from the nursery, vital monitors that track sleep and breathing and video monitors that add sight to sound. Babylist parents overwhelmingly choose video monitors. The security of seeing what your child is up to—like if they’ve gotten tangled in their swaddle, pulled their diaper off or climbed out of the crib—can be worth the extra cost of a video monitor.
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